The Bedroom Window (1987)

R | 112 mins | Drama, Mystery | 16 January 1987

Director:

Curtis Hanson

Writer:

Curtis Hanson

Producer:

Martha Schumacher

Cinematographer:

Gil Taylor

Production Designer:

Ron Foreman

Production Company:

Bedroom Window Productions, Ltd.
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HISTORY


       Principal photography began 21 Apr 1986 in Baltimore, MD, where the crew shot for two weeks, according to promotional information in AMPAS library files. Locations included Mount Vernon Square, the Clarence Mitchell Courthouse, the Baltimore Museum of Art, and the city’s Inner Harbor.
       Interior scenes were shot at the De Laurentiis Entertainment Group Film Studios in Wilmington, NC. The dramatic scene at the ballet was shot in Winston-Salem, NC, at the Stevens Center, a former movie palace now serving as the Performing Arts Center for the North Carolina School of the Arts.
       The film was set to open on 16 Jan 1987 on approximately 875 screens nationwide, according to a 9 Jan 1987 HR report. Reviews tended to be positive with frequent comparisons to director Alfred Hitchcock’s style of suspense.

      End credits include “special thanks” to: The North Carolina Dance Theater, the Stevens Center and the People of Baltimore, Wilmington and Winston-Salem.

              End credits state, “Filmed at DEG Film Stuidos, Wilmington, North Carolina and on location in Baltimore, Maryland and Winston-Salem, North Carolina.” ... More Less


       Principal photography began 21 Apr 1986 in Baltimore, MD, where the crew shot for two weeks, according to promotional information in AMPAS library files. Locations included Mount Vernon Square, the Clarence Mitchell Courthouse, the Baltimore Museum of Art, and the city’s Inner Harbor.
       Interior scenes were shot at the De Laurentiis Entertainment Group Film Studios in Wilmington, NC. The dramatic scene at the ballet was shot in Winston-Salem, NC, at the Stevens Center, a former movie palace now serving as the Performing Arts Center for the North Carolina School of the Arts.
       The film was set to open on 16 Jan 1987 on approximately 875 screens nationwide, according to a 9 Jan 1987 HR report. Reviews tended to be positive with frequent comparisons to director Alfred Hitchcock’s style of suspense.

      End credits include “special thanks” to: The North Carolina Dance Theater, the Stevens Center and the People of Baltimore, Wilmington and Winston-Salem.

              End credits state, “Filmed at DEG Film Stuidos, Wilmington, North Carolina and on location in Baltimore, Maryland and Winston-Salem, North Carolina.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 Jan 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jan 1987
p. 3, 55.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jan 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
16 Jan 1987
p. 17.
New York Times
16 Jan 1987
p. 6.
Variety
7 Jan 1987
p. 21.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
De Laurentiis Entertainment Group
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st cam asst
Cam asst
Cam asst
Steadicam op
Addl cam op
Addl cam op
Addl cam op
Gaffer
Gaffer
Key grip
Key grip
Best boy
Best boy
Dolly grip
Generator op
Still photog
Camera and lenses by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Ed by
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Ed asst
SET DECORATORS
Asst set dec
Baltimore set buyer
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Lead carpenter
Head painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Dresser
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Boom op
Cable person
Supv sd ed
ADR ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd transfer and rec
Re-rec studio
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Foley services by
Foley services by
Foley services by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Main titles
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Unit loc mgr
Baltimore loc mgr
Scr supv
Loc asst
Prod coord
Asst to prod
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst auditor
Unit pub
Wilmington casting
Miss Huppert's dial coach
Baltimore casting
Transportation coord
Driver capt
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Witnesses by Anne Holden (New York, 1971).
AUTHOR
SONGS
“Beautiful Thief,” performed by Ava Cherry, written by Raun & Jon Butcher, produced by Spencer Proffer for PASHA, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc., published by The Grand Pasha Publisher
“Hyperactive,” performed by Robert Palmer, written by Robert Palmer, Dennis Nelson and Tony Haynes, courtesy of Island Records, published by Bungalow Music, NV, Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), Island Music, Inc., and Les Etoiles de la Musique (BMI)
“Seduction,” performed by Val Young, written by Rick James, courtesy of Motown Record, Corp, published by Stone City Music Company (ASCAP) (Administered by National League Music)
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SONGS
“Beautiful Thief,” performed by Ava Cherry, written by Raun & Jon Butcher, produced by Spencer Proffer for PASHA, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc., published by The Grand Pasha Publisher
“Hyperactive,” performed by Robert Palmer, written by Robert Palmer, Dennis Nelson and Tony Haynes, courtesy of Island Records, published by Bungalow Music, NV, Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), Island Music, Inc., and Les Etoiles de la Musique (BMI)
“Seduction,” performed by Val Young, written by Rick James, courtesy of Motown Record, Corp, published by Stone City Music Company (ASCAP) (Administered by National League Music)
“Criminal Mind,” composed and performed by Danny Wilde, courtesy of Island Records, published by Island Music, Inc. and Tiger God Music (BMI)
“A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” written by Felix Mendlessohn, performed by the Winston-Salem Symphony, Peter Perret, conductor
“Happy Birthday To You,” written by Mildred J. Hill and Patty S. Hill, published by Summy-Birchard Music, division of Birch Tree Group
“Cold Shot,” performed by Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble, written by Mike Kindred and W.C. Clark, produced by Stevie Ray Vaughan, courtesy of Epic Records, published by Hard Case Music (BMI)
“Sweet & Sexy Thing,” performed by Rick James, written by Rick James, courtesy of Motown Record Corp, published by Stone City Music Company (ASCAP) (Administered by National League Music)
“You Keep Me Hangin’ On,” sung, arranged and produced by Mark Stein, performed by Mark Stein and Danger Zone, written by Brian Holland, Edward Holland and Lamont Dozier, courtesy of Starstruck Management, Inc., published by Stone Agate Music Division (BMI).
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DETAILS
Release Date:
16 January 1987
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 16 January 1987
Production Date:
began 21 April 1986 in Baltimore, MD, Wilmington and Winston-Salem, NC
Copyright Claimant:
DeLaurentiis Entertainment Group, Inc.
Copyright Date:
20 February 1987
Copyright Number:
PA317666
Physical Properties:
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
112
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28330
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Baltimore, Maryland, young construction company executive Terry Lambert starts a sexual affair with Sylvia Wentworth, the wife of his boss, after months of flirting. About 2:15 a.m., during a post-coital chat in bed, Sylvia hears screams outside and goes to the window to see a tall, redheaded man attacking a young woman in the park below. She bangs on the window, which creates enough noise to chase the attacker away, while other neighbors, hearing the woman’s screams, come to her aid. The next day, the newspaper reports a young woman was attacked and killed, her body thrown into a dumpster, just a few blocks from Terry’s apartment, a half hour after the attack in the park. Following another sexual encounter, Terry and Sylvia wonder if the same person attacked both women. Sylvia considers telling the police what she saw, but Terry advises against it since her identity might come out and their affair would be exposed. Instead, Terry telephones the police with the information, claiming to be the one who witnessed the attack. After Terry gives his statement, Detective Quirke tells him they believe the two cases are indeed connected and they already have a suspect, someone who has attacked women before. Sometime later, police call in Terry to identify the man in a line-up. At the police station, however, he is unable to unable identify anyone since he did not actually witness the crime, but merely tells the police that he cannot be sure. He also meets Denise Connolly, the waitress who was attacked, who thanks him for saving her. Denise was also unable to identify the attacker since he came up from behind her. ... +


In Baltimore, Maryland, young construction company executive Terry Lambert starts a sexual affair with Sylvia Wentworth, the wife of his boss, after months of flirting. About 2:15 a.m., during a post-coital chat in bed, Sylvia hears screams outside and goes to the window to see a tall, redheaded man attacking a young woman in the park below. She bangs on the window, which creates enough noise to chase the attacker away, while other neighbors, hearing the woman’s screams, come to her aid. The next day, the newspaper reports a young woman was attacked and killed, her body thrown into a dumpster, just a few blocks from Terry’s apartment, a half hour after the attack in the park. Following another sexual encounter, Terry and Sylvia wonder if the same person attacked both women. Sylvia considers telling the police what she saw, but Terry advises against it since her identity might come out and their affair would be exposed. Instead, Terry telephones the police with the information, claiming to be the one who witnessed the attack. After Terry gives his statement, Detective Quirke tells him they believe the two cases are indeed connected and they already have a suspect, someone who has attacked women before. Sometime later, police call in Terry to identify the man in a line-up. At the police station, however, he is unable to unable identify anyone since he did not actually witness the crime, but merely tells the police that he cannot be sure. He also meets Denise Connolly, the waitress who was attacked, who thanks him for saving her. Denise was also unable to identify the attacker since he came up from behind her. As he walks to his car, Terry notices Chris Henderson, one of the men from the line-up, get into his truck and decides to follow in his car. Terry learns where the man lives and works, then takes Sylvia to sit outside the Baltimore Shipyard to see if she can identify him as he leaves work. However, Sylvia cannot be sure it is him. Later, that night, Terry follows Henderson to Fells Point Saloon, where a young woman dances provocatively, generating cheers from the other patrons. Terry watches Henderson carefully, but is momentarily distracted and loses him. When Terry cannot find him again, he heads back home, but en route finds a police barricade. He learns a woman was just murdered and when he gets a glimpse of the body, realizes it is the dancer from the bar. The next day, Terry goes to the police station to say he thinks one of the men from the line-up did it, explaining that he wanted to see him at night, so he followed him. However, Terry does not mention that he followed the man to Fells Point Saloon. The police get a warrant and search Chris Henderson’s home and car, but find no evidence connecting him to the murders. However, since Terry has identified Henderson, the state’s attorney wants to prosecute him for Denise’s assault, using Terry as their primary witness. Sylvia is upset by this news, saying she has everything to lose if their affair is exposed, but promises to be in the courtroom to support Terry. Meanwhile, Terry runs into Denise in the park and she thanks him for telling the truth. At the trial, Terry testifies under oath that Henderson is the man he saw. However, during cross-examination, Henderson’s lawyer asks him to take out his contact lenses for an experiment. The lawyer dims the lights and stands at the back of the courtroom, asking Terry to identify what he is holding in his hand. Sylvia tries to signal Terry what the object is, something that catches the attention of both Denise and Henderson. However, Terry cannot identify the object as a book, so his identification of Henderson is discredited and the case dropped. Later, Denise comes by Terry’s apartment to commiserate about the trial. After seeing Sylvia in the courtroom, she realizes Sylvia was the person who really witnessed the assault and asks Terry to tell the truth. Later, a neighbor tells Terry the police were just questioning her about him. When he gets to work, his boss, Colin Wentworth, Sylvia’s husband, also reports the police were questioning the employees about him. Later, when Terry makes a telephone call, he hears a clicking sound on the line and fears his telephone is being tapped by the police. Terry meets Sylvia at the aquarium and pressures her to come forward as the witness, but she refuses. Later, Terry explains the situation to Denise who replies he is either an idiot or a romantic fool, but she gives him a little more time before going to the police about Sylvia. The next day, police bring Terry in for questioning, saying they have witnesses from Fells Point Saloon who can identify him being there the night the girl was murdered. Terry refuses to talk, requesting a lawyer instead. Terry telephones Sylvia at home but she hangs up on him. When Colin asks his wife about the call, she confesses about the affair, but says it only happened once. Terry interrupts a black-tie ballet performance, demanding to talk to Sylvia. She goes to the lobby with him, explaining that it was definitely Henderson she saw, but their affair is over and to leave her alone. When she goes back into the theater, the usher tells her the act is almost finished and to wait in the back so as not to disturb the others. When Terry goes to his car, he notices Henderson’s truck parked nearby. He rushes back into the theater and finds Sylvia dead, stabbed in the chest. Colin accuses Terry of the crime. Terry rushes for the stage to escape through the back of the theatre, while Henderson quietly leaves through a side door. Denise lets Terry hide at her apartment, despite television news reports that he is the main suspect in Sylvia’s murder. As the two talk about her assault, Denise says the night of the attack, she presented one of the bartenders a birthday cake and a big kiss, something that caught the attention of all patrons. They decide Henderson must become aroused by women who are the center of attention and murders them as some kind of punishment. They devise a plan to trap Henderson. Wearing a wig and flashy makeup, Denise goes to a bar where Henderson is drinking and provocatively plays pool, getting the attention of every patron. Meanwhile Terry is outside ready to telephone police. Henderson gets a glimpse of Denise’s wallet to learn her address, then leaves. Shortly after, Denise also leaves. When Terry goes to the telephone booth, another man is using it and refuses to give it up. Terry starts a fight, which brings the police. Terry steals their police car and rushes to Denise’s. Meanwhile, as Denise takes the stairs to her apartment, Henderson comes from behind and attacks her. She fights back, but when her wig is knocked off, he recognizes her. She shoots pepper spray in his face, but he rushes out the door. As Henderson gets into his truck, Terry grabs onto the driver’s side window and hits him repeatedly. Nonetheless, Henderson starts driving, trying to knock Terry off the truck. Instead, he crashes into a police car. Henderson is arrested, which makes Terry and Denise happy.




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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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