Creepshow 2 (1987)

R | 92 mins | Horror | 1 May 1987

Director:

Michael Gornick

Producer:

David Ball

Cinematographers:

Richard Hart, Tom Hurwitz

Production Designer:

Bruce Miller

Production Company:

Laurel
Full page view
HISTORY

Creepshow 2 is the sequel to 1982’s horror anthology movie Creepshow (see entry) and is based horror stories by Stephen King. “The Raft” was first published in Nov 1982 in Gallery magazine and included in the 1985 King anthology collection Skeleton Crew, while “The Hitchhiker” and “Old Chief Wood’nhead” were both unpublished.
       Following the success of Creepshow, a sequel was planned. The 19 Apr 1984 DV reported that Laurel Entertainment was producing the picture independently, after Warner Bros. opted not to distribute the film. George A. Romero, who directed the first movie, was in the midst of completing a second draft of the screenplay. However, a new director was being sought for the sequel. Although a late summer 1984 start was anticipated, nothing came of that plan.
       In summer 1986, New World Pictures agreed to co-produce and distribute the film, the 9 Jul 1986 Var reported. Principal photography began 15 Sep 1986, according to a 1 Oct 1986 DV production chart. The 24 Sep 1986 Var reported the film had a $5.2 million budget. Promotional materials in AMPAS library files indicate the segment titled “The Raft” was filmed in Prescott, AZ, as were the exteriors for “Old Chief Wood’nhead.” Meanwhile, the interiors to “Old Chief Wood’nhead” were shot in Bangor, ME. “The Hitchhiker” was filmed entirely in Bangor, ME,
       Creepshow 2 opened on 867 screens on 1 May 1987, taking in $8 million in its first three weeks of release, as reported by DV on 20 May 1987.
       End credits state: “Special thanks ... More Less

Creepshow 2 is the sequel to 1982’s horror anthology movie Creepshow (see entry) and is based horror stories by Stephen King. “The Raft” was first published in Nov 1982 in Gallery magazine and included in the 1985 King anthology collection Skeleton Crew, while “The Hitchhiker” and “Old Chief Wood’nhead” were both unpublished.
       Following the success of Creepshow, a sequel was planned. The 19 Apr 1984 DV reported that Laurel Entertainment was producing the picture independently, after Warner Bros. opted not to distribute the film. George A. Romero, who directed the first movie, was in the midst of completing a second draft of the screenplay. However, a new director was being sought for the sequel. Although a late summer 1984 start was anticipated, nothing came of that plan.
       In summer 1986, New World Pictures agreed to co-produce and distribute the film, the 9 Jul 1986 Var reported. Principal photography began 15 Sep 1986, according to a 1 Oct 1986 DV production chart. The 24 Sep 1986 Var reported the film had a $5.2 million budget. Promotional materials in AMPAS library files indicate the segment titled “The Raft” was filmed in Prescott, AZ, as were the exteriors for “Old Chief Wood’nhead.” Meanwhile, the interiors to “Old Chief Wood’nhead” were shot in Bangor, ME. “The Hitchhiker” was filmed entirely in Bangor, ME,
       Creepshow 2 opened on 867 screens on 1 May 1987, taking in $8 million in its first three weeks of release, as reported by DV on 20 May 1987.
       End credits state: “Special thanks to: Michael Berner; Don Buffington; Jack Dyer; Patrick Farrelly; Tom Foster; Arthur Greene; Jack Kamen; Tabitha King; Stephanie Leonard; Kirby McCauley; Larry Mehaney; Art Rooney II; Irvin Shapiro; David Speed; Vincent J. Survinski; The cities and people of Bangor, Brewer and Dexter, Maine, Joseph Brennan – Congressman, John McKernan – Governor; the cities and people of Humboldt and Prescott, Arizona, W. M. E. MacCallum and Sharon Davenport – Arizona Film Commission.”
       End credits conclude with the following quotation from Colliers Magazine 1949: "Juvenile delinquency is the product of pent-up frustrations, stored-up resentments and bottled-up fears. It is not the product of cartoons and captions. But the comics are a handy, obvious, uncomplicated scapegoat. If the adults who crusade against them would only get as steamed up over such basic causes of delinquency as parental ignorance, indifference and cruelty, they might discover that comic books are no more a menace than Treasure Island or Jack the Giant Killer."
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
19 Apr 1984.
---
Daily Variety
1 Oct 1986.
---
Daily Variety
1 May 1986
p. 3, 10.
Daily Variety
20 May 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 May 1987
p. 3, 76.
Los Angeles Times
5 May 1987
Calendar, p. 5.
New York Times
4 May 1987
p. 17.
Variety
9 Jul 1986.
---
Variety
24 Sep 1986.
---
Variety
13 May 1987
p. 19.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
New World Pictures Presents
A Laurel Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
Cam asst
Cam asst
Cam asst
Cam asst
Cam asst
Gaffer
Gaffer
Best boy
Best boy
Elec
Elec
Elec
Generator op
Generator op
Generator op
Key grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Still photog
Lighting
Cam and lenses
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst prod des
Asst prod des
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Const coord
Head scenic
Head carpenter
Head carpenter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Women's swimsuits
Sports footwear
MUSIC
Mus comp
Addl mus
Mus rec at
SOUND
Sd ed
Boom op
Dubbing mixer
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd dailies
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup eff created
Makeup eff created
Makeup & hair
Makeup & hair asst
Makeup eff tech
Makeup eff tech
Makeup eff tech
Makeup eff consultant
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting dir
Laurel prod exec
Laurel prod exec
Asst prod mgr
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Scr supv
Transportation capt
Mercedes mechanic
Asst to exec prod
Asst to prod
Prod secy
Prod secy
Diving coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Catering
Catering
BMW accessories
Mercedes provided by
Underwater communications
Legal services
Completion guarantor
"Cisco Kid" TV segments
Laboratory services, U.K.
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
ANIMATION
Anim des & supv
Ink & paint
Backgrounds
Comic pages
Sd reader
COLOR PERSONNEL
Film dailies
Film dailies
Laboratory services, U.K.
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on stories by Stephen King.
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 May 1987
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 1 May 1987
Production Date:
began 15 September 1986
Copyright Claimant:
New World Pictures
Copyright Date:
4 June 1987
Copyright Number:
PA333103
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
92
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28534
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In a small Maine town, young Billy waits on his bicycle for the magazine delivery truck, anxious to get the new issue of Creepshow comics. The cover of the magazine reads “Jolting Tales of Horror.” Billy begins reading the comic book as he heads home on his bike. In the story “Old Chief Wood’nhead,” a large wooden Indian sits in front of Spruce’s General Store in Dead River, a once thriving, but now dying town in Arizona. Store owner Ray Spruce refreshes the paint on the sun-bleached wooden Indian, while his wife, Martha, suggests they close the store and retire, while they still have some savings left. Ray believes that they have made their living from the people in the town and cannot abandon the residents during the hard times. Ben Whitemoon, a Native American tribe official, brings Ray an assortment of jewelry from each of the families in town who owe him money. Ray refuses to accept it, but Ben suggests a compromise. The tribesmen will pay him back in the next two years and Ray will return their jewelry. Those who cannot pay in that time will forfeit their jewels. When Ray and Martha Spruce go back inside, they find three local youth robbing the store, led by Sam Whitemoon, the nephew of Ben Whitemoon. The young men take what little money is in the cash register, and trash the store. Sam Whitemoon holds Martha at gunpoint, demanding the jewelry as well. Ray pleads that the jewels are from Sam’s own people and that he should not steal them. Sam accidently pulls the trigger and Martha is shot and killed. ... +


In a small Maine town, young Billy waits on his bicycle for the magazine delivery truck, anxious to get the new issue of Creepshow comics. The cover of the magazine reads “Jolting Tales of Horror.” Billy begins reading the comic book as he heads home on his bike. In the story “Old Chief Wood’nhead,” a large wooden Indian sits in front of Spruce’s General Store in Dead River, a once thriving, but now dying town in Arizona. Store owner Ray Spruce refreshes the paint on the sun-bleached wooden Indian, while his wife, Martha, suggests they close the store and retire, while they still have some savings left. Ray believes that they have made their living from the people in the town and cannot abandon the residents during the hard times. Ben Whitemoon, a Native American tribe official, brings Ray an assortment of jewelry from each of the families in town who owe him money. Ray refuses to accept it, but Ben suggests a compromise. The tribesmen will pay him back in the next two years and Ray will return their jewelry. Those who cannot pay in that time will forfeit their jewels. When Ray and Martha Spruce go back inside, they find three local youth robbing the store, led by Sam Whitemoon, the nephew of Ben Whitemoon. The young men take what little money is in the cash register, and trash the store. Sam Whitemoon holds Martha at gunpoint, demanding the jewelry as well. Ray pleads that the jewels are from Sam’s own people and that he should not steal them. Sam accidently pulls the trigger and Martha is shot and killed. As Ray rushes to his wife, Sam fires at him, killing him. Sam and his two friends make plans to leave for Hollywood, California, later that night. Sam dreams of stardom and believes his waist-length hair will help him become famous. They shoot their guns around the store and also shoot the wooden Indian. After they leave, the Indian comes to life. As Fatso, one of the three thieves, packs his bags, Chief Wood’nhead comes to his house, and shoots and kills him with arrows. When Andy Cavenaugh tries to sneak out of the house without his parents noticing, he finds his car has been smashed up. As Andy examines the damage, Chief Wood’nhead smashes his skull with a tomahawk. At Sam Whitemoon’s house, Sam sees the wooden Indian coming and shoots, but does not stop the monster, which kills him. The next morning, Ben Whitemoon drives to the store and the wooden Indian is back his usual position, but holding the scalped head of Sam. In “The Raft,” four college friends drive down a winding country road to an isolated lake on a late September afternoon. They smoke marijuana and are eager to go swimming. When they arrive, they put on their bathing suits and swim to a wooden raft anchored in the middle of the small lake. Randy notices some sludge in the water that seems to be moving toward them. When they climb onto the raft, Deke dismisses Randy’s concern and they smoke some more marijuana. As the sludge gets near the wooden raft, Rachel reaches out to touch it. The sludge grabs her, pulls her into the water, and kills her. The others say the sludge “ate” Rachel. The three friends cautiously watch the sludge, which goes under the raft, reaches up between the wooden slats, and grabs Deke’s foot, pulling him into the water and killing him. Randy and Laverne nervously take turns watching the sludge, which sits in the water a few feet away from the raft. However, Laverne falls asleep while on watch and the sludge pulls her into the water and kills her. Randy jumps into the water and swims for shore. The sludge gives chase but Randy beats it back to the land. Randy screams at the sludge, “I beat you!” However, as the sludge gets to shore, it creates a giant wave that engulfs Randy, killing him. In “The Hitchhiker,” Annie Lansing wakes up in her lover’s bed. The power has gone off and she is now late. She pays the man $150 for his services and thanks him for the six orgasms he gave her. Annie rushes to her Mercedes Benz automobile and worries what her demanding husband, lawyer George Lansing, will say when she is not home by 11:30 p.m. as promised. She worries how she can possibly drive twenty miles in seven minutes. When she accidently drops a lit cigarette on the leather car seat, Annie momentarily looks away and hits a hitchhiker on the side of the road. She stops her car, wondering if she should get out to help the man, but also realizes that the area is deserted and no one saw her hit him. A moment later, she sees headlights coming around the curve and speeds away. The next driver stops to help the man, as do a truck driver and another car. They telephone 911 to report a hit and run. Several miles down the road, Annie comes to a stop sign and finds the hitchhiker she hit is following her, his face bloody from the impact with the pavement. He comes to her car window and says, “Thanks for the ride.” Annie speeds away, but the hitchhiker attempts to get in through the open sun roof. Annie closes the sun roof, but the hitchhike’s hand is stuck inside the car. Annie drives into the woods, hoping a low-hanging tree branch will knock the man off the roof. After he falls from the roof, Annie believes she is safe, but reaches into the glove compartment to get a pistol nonetheless. As she does this, the hitchhiker opens the passenger door, saying, “Thanks for the ride,” and lunges toward her. Annie shoots him and he falls to the ground. She runs over the man again and again, then drives away. However, a moment later, the man crawls onto the hood of the car. Annie drives into a tree to throw him from the hood and then hits him repeatedly with the car until his body is split in two. Annie passes out in the car and when she awakens, a light snow covers the ground. The car is wrecked, and covered in blood with many dents. The front headlight hangs by a wire, while the front bumper has fallen off. Annie drives through the dark woods until she finds the highway, then drives home, convincing herself that she can tell her husband she is late due to an accident. But when she pulls into the garage at her house, her husband’s car is not there. The hitchhiker crawls from the underside of her car and attacks. When her husband arrives home a little later, he finds the garage door closed, the engine still running, and Annie dead.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.