Cross My Heart (1987)

R | 91 mins | Romantic comedy | 13 November 1987

Director:

Armyan Bernstein

Producer:

Lawrence Kasdan

Cinematographer:

Thomas Del Ruth

Editor:

Mia Goldman

Production Designer:

Lawrence G. Paull

Production Company:

Universal Pictures
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HISTORY

       The genesis of Cross My Heart came in 1984 when writer Gail Parent pitched her idea for a movie dealing with a single date to executive producer Alan Greisman, who liked the concept and introduced her to director Armyan Bernstein. According to promotional material in AMPAS library files, Greisman suggested Parent and Bernstein work together on the script to be sure the male and female perspectives were authentic. The 3 Oct 1984 Var reported their collaboration on the film, which had the working title, An American Date.
       The movie was originally supposed to star Martin Short and JoBeth Williams, but Williams dropped out after learning she was pregnant, the 24 Dec 1986 DV reported. Annette O’Toole replaced her, the 28 Jan 1987 Var announced.
       Principal photography began on 2 Feb 1987 in Los Angeles, CA, and wrapped on 2 April 1987. Since the film’s action occurs over a single night and much of it is in a single location, the production schedule was arranged to shoot the majority of the film in sequence. The 6 May 1986 DV stated the budget was under $10 million.
       During production, the film had several working titles. The 24 Dec 1986 DV contained one brief which stated the film’s title was Date, and another brief in that same issue called the project American Date. The 10 Feb 1987 HR production chart referred to the film as “Untitled,” while the 17 Feb 1987 DV production chart listed it as American Date. However, by May 1987, producers ... More Less

       The genesis of Cross My Heart came in 1984 when writer Gail Parent pitched her idea for a movie dealing with a single date to executive producer Alan Greisman, who liked the concept and introduced her to director Armyan Bernstein. According to promotional material in AMPAS library files, Greisman suggested Parent and Bernstein work together on the script to be sure the male and female perspectives were authentic. The 3 Oct 1984 Var reported their collaboration on the film, which had the working title, An American Date.
       The movie was originally supposed to star Martin Short and JoBeth Williams, but Williams dropped out after learning she was pregnant, the 24 Dec 1986 DV reported. Annette O’Toole replaced her, the 28 Jan 1987 Var announced.
       Principal photography began on 2 Feb 1987 in Los Angeles, CA, and wrapped on 2 April 1987. Since the film’s action occurs over a single night and much of it is in a single location, the production schedule was arranged to shoot the majority of the film in sequence. The 6 May 1986 DV stated the budget was under $10 million.
       During production, the film had several working titles. The 24 Dec 1986 DV contained one brief which stated the film’s title was Date, and another brief in that same issue called the project American Date. The 10 Feb 1987 HR production chart referred to the film as “Untitled,” while the 17 Feb 1987 DV production chart listed it as American Date. However, by May 1987, producers had settled upon Cross My Heart, the 13 May 1987 Var reported.
       Cross My Heart opened in limited release on 205 screens on 13 Nov 1987, earning a mere $455,100 during its first three days of release according to 17 Nov 1987 DV box-office reports. Within two weeks, distributor Universal Pictures was no longer tracking the film, the 1 Dec 1987 DV announced.

      End credits include the following, “The producers would like to thanks the following artists: Carole Hoffnagle; Robert Hoppe; Mickey Kaplan; Roy Lichtenstein; Hubert Pattieu; Man Ray; Brook Temple; Thomas Wesselman; and Artists Rights Society, Inc.; Images Import; Mirage Editions, Inc.; Visual Artists & Galleries Association, Inc.” End credits also note: "Sony Television Sets furnished by Sony Corporation of America; Ray-Ban Sunglasses furnished by Bausch & Lomb, Inc.; Additional Sunglasses and Display furnished by Opti-Ray, Inc.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
6 May 1986.
---
Daily Variety
24 Dec 1986.
---
Daily Variety
17 Feb 1987.
---
Daily Variety
11 Nov 1987
p. 3, 13.
Daily Variety
17 Nov 1987.
---
Daily Variety
1 Dec 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Nov 1987
p. 3, 13.
Los Angeles Times
17 Nov 1987
p. 7.
New York Times
13 Nov 1987
p. 21.
Variety
3 Oct 1984.
---
Variety
28 Jan 1987.
---
Variety
13 May 1987.
---
Variety
18 Nov 1987
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Lawrence Kasdan Presents
An Aaron Spelling, Alan Greisman Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Co-prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Lamp op
Lamp op
Key grip
Key grip
Best boy
Best boy
Dolly grip
Dolly drip
Addl cam op
Addl 2d asst cam
Panaglide op
1st asst cam, Addl crew
2d asst cam, Addl crew
Chief lighting tech, Addl crew
Asst chief lighting tech, Addl crew
Asst chief lighting tech, Addl crew
Key grip, Addl crew
Best boy grip, Addl crew
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir, Addl crew
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Set des
Lead person
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Const coord
Const foreman
Carpenter foreman
Head carpenter
Labor foreman
Standby painter
Greensman
Set dec, Addl crew
Const coord, Addl crew
COSTUMES
Women`s cost
Women`s cost
Men`s cost
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
Mus supv by
for the Soundtrack Company
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd asst
Foley
Foley
Performed at
Supv re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff foreman
Opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Body make-up
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Tech consultant
Craft service
First aid person
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Atmosphere casting
Unit pub
Prod coord
Asst to Mr. Kasdan
Asst to Mr. Bernstein
Secy to Mr. Bernstein
Asst to Mr. Spelling
Asst to Mr. Greisman
Pub asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod accountant
Casting assoc
Talent coord
Casting coord
DeLuxe contact
Scr supv, Addl crew
Prod coord, Addl crew
Loc mgr, Addl crew
Transportation coord, Addl crew
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
“One Heartbeat,” written by Steve Legassick and Brian Ray, performed by Smokey Robinson, courtesy of Motown Record Corporation
“Hot In The Flames of Love,” written by Narada Michael Walden, Preston Glass and Jeffrey Cohen, performed by Patti Austin, courtesy of Qwest Records by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Perfect World,” written by David Byrne and Chris Frantz, performed by Talking Heads, courtesy of EMI Records Ltd./Sire Records by arrangement with Warner Special Products
+
SONGS
“One Heartbeat,” written by Steve Legassick and Brian Ray, performed by Smokey Robinson, courtesy of Motown Record Corporation
“Hot In The Flames of Love,” written by Narada Michael Walden, Preston Glass and Jeffrey Cohen, performed by Patti Austin, courtesy of Qwest Records by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Perfect World,” written by David Byrne and Chris Frantz, performed by Talking Heads, courtesy of EMI Records Ltd./Sire Records by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Holding Back The Years,” written by Mick Hucknall and Neil Moss, performed by Simply Red, courtesy of Elektra/Asylum Records by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“So Much In Love,” written by William Jackson, George Williams and Roy Straigis, by arrangement with Abkco Music, Inc., performed by Timothy B. Schmit, courtesy of Elektra/Asylum Records by arrangement with Warner Special Products.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Date
American Date
An American Date
Release Date:
13 November 1987
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 13 Nov 1987
Production Date:
2 Feb--2 Apr 1987
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
30 March 1988
Copyright Number:
PA362502
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Color by De Luxe®
Lenses
Panaflex® Camera and Lenses by Panavision
Duration(in mins):
91
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28826
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, California, David and Kathy met seventeen days ago and have been on two dates, but have not yet kissed. Each is nervous as they prepare for their third date. David wonders if a woman as good as Kathy can ever fall for him, while she says he makes her laugh and is the kind of man she could fall in love with. David thought he was getting a promotion at work, but instead was fired from his job as a sunglasses salesman and wants to cancel the date. However, his best friend, Bruce, talks him out of it. To boost his confidence, Bruce offers to let him borrow his new car and use his luxury apartment for the evening. Kathy worries what David will think when he learns about her seven-year-old daughter, Jessie, as well as some of her other bad habits, including smoking cigarettes. Her sister, Nancy, who is babysitting for her, gives her a pep talk. When Kathy insists she is not going to have sex with David, Nancy points out that she has her diaphragm in her purse. When David comes to pick her up, Kathy will not let him into the house, instead coming outside and congratulating him on becoming regional sales manager. She assumes the new car is part of the job and he does not correct her. They go to an exclusive restaurant where David leaves his car with the valet. After dinner, when David asks where the valet is, the maître d’ reports they do not have a valet. They leave in a taxi and Kathy tries to lighten the mood by saying that going through something awful ... +


In Los Angeles, California, David and Kathy met seventeen days ago and have been on two dates, but have not yet kissed. Each is nervous as they prepare for their third date. David wonders if a woman as good as Kathy can ever fall for him, while she says he makes her laugh and is the kind of man she could fall in love with. David thought he was getting a promotion at work, but instead was fired from his job as a sunglasses salesman and wants to cancel the date. However, his best friend, Bruce, talks him out of it. To boost his confidence, Bruce offers to let him borrow his new car and use his luxury apartment for the evening. Kathy worries what David will think when he learns about her seven-year-old daughter, Jessie, as well as some of her other bad habits, including smoking cigarettes. Her sister, Nancy, who is babysitting for her, gives her a pep talk. When Kathy insists she is not going to have sex with David, Nancy points out that she has her diaphragm in her purse. When David comes to pick her up, Kathy will not let him into the house, instead coming outside and congratulating him on becoming regional sales manager. She assumes the new car is part of the job and he does not correct her. They go to an exclusive restaurant where David leaves his car with the valet. After dinner, when David asks where the valet is, the maître d’ reports they do not have a valet. They leave in a taxi and Kathy tries to lighten the mood by saying that going through something awful like having a car stolen can help them bond. Kathy is reluctant to return to David’s apartment, but agrees nonetheless. David makes her wait in the hallway while he goes inside to remove evidence that it is really Bruce’s apartment, including his mail and prescription drugs. Once inside, Kathy becomes upset when she breaks a model airplane. David reassures her it is not a problem and they almost kiss, but pull away. Then Kathy begins kissing him aggressively. While David fixes drinks, Kathy looks through his books, wondering why Bruce’s name is in all of them. David lies, saying his neighbor Bruce had to move, so he bought his books. Kathy asks him to play the piano for her. He does an awkward Montgomery Clift impression while playing, but nonetheless, she says she enjoyed it. The two make out, but fall off the sofa to the floor. She suggests they slow down and talk for a while and pulls out a magazine quiz, “Ten Things You Should Know about a Man before You Go to Bed with Him.” She asks how many women he has slept with. David responds, “fifty-four,” a number that Kathy considers surprisingly high. He asks if “eleven” is a number more to her liking. They also determine that neither has herpes or any other sexually transmitted diseases. Kathy says she is not interested in casual sex and needs a semi-commitment before sleeping with a man. David writes her name and phone number on the wall, asking if that is enough of a commitment. She replies that he probably repaints the wall every week, but also agrees to have sex. She goes to the bathroom and has a cigarette, while he prepares the bedroom. They undress each other. She is surprised to see him wearing zebra-striped bikini briefs, while he is startled that she has tissues in her bra straps to add padding to her shoulders. He removes her bra and tosses it aside, accidentally throwing it out the window. She removes his underwear and deliberately throws it out the window. She takes a condom from her purse and they make love. The shirt that David threw over the lamp to dim the light catches fire, but he quickly puts it out. Kathy says sex with him was great, that he was “Superman” and says she wants to do it again. He becomes distant and tries to make small talk. When he questions her more about the sex, she confesses she had a “small orgasm,” which upsets him. David asks her to cuddle, but Kathy says she has to leave soon as she has to get up early in the morning. The telephone rings, but Bruce’s machine answers. The caller leaves a message expressing sympathy for David getting fired. He is embarrassed that Kathy heard the message, but confesses it is true. She offers to stay a while longer to comfort him and telephones her sister, asking her to babysit a little longer. When she hangs up, David asks who Jessie is. Kathy lights a cigarette and confesses she has a daughter, explaining she did not tell David because some men are afraid to get involved with a woman who has a child. David admits he wanted her, but not a family. As Kathy puts her clothes on to leave, she questions why so many things in the apartment have Bruce’s name on them. She asks if David is bisexual and Bruce is his male lover. David lies, saying he bought the apartment from Bruce, but has not moved out all of his belongings yet. Just then, Bruce returns. Seeing them there, he pretends he is in the wrong apartment, but Kathy recognizes his voice from the answering machine. She leaves in a huff and goes to a nearby diner to call a taxi. David follows, saying he would not have gone to all the trouble to impress her if he did not like her. As she waits for the taxi, she rants that David made her think she was the only liar in the relationship by becoming upset upon learning she has a daughter, but he was also lying about Bruce’s apartment and the car. She wishes she could take the sex back. He did not think she would like the real David and believed she deserved better. He suggests that if the next five men she goes out with are worse people than him, to please give him a call. Just then, the man who stole Bruce’s car pulls into the adjacent convenience store parking lot. David confronts the man and gets the car keys back. He offers Kathy a ride home, but first they return to Bruce’s to retrieve her bra. As they plunder through the bushes, a woman comes out with a gun, thinking they are burglars. They yell for Bruce to come out and vouch for them, which he does. David gives Kathy a pair of sunglasses, which she likes, and says he wishes they could do the entire date all over again. The next day, David drives to Kathy’s house in his beat-up Mustang and they pretend they’re starting their third date. David tells her that he was fired and Kathy introduces him to her daughter, and invites him inside.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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