Disorderlies (1987)

PG | 86 mins | Comedy, Adventure | 14 August 1987

Director:

Michael Schultz

Cinematographer:

Rolf Kesterman

Editor:

Ned Humphreys

Production Designer:

George Costello

Production Company:

Warner Bros., Inc.
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HISTORY


       Disorderlies marked the first starring role for successful Brooklyn, New York-based rap group The Fat Boys. Promotional material in AMPAS library files indicates the screenplay was inspired by the off-stage antics of the three rap music performers. Screenwriters Mark Feldberg and Mitchell Klebanoff toured with the Fat Boys in order to tailor the script to their personalities. Director Michael Schultz told the 7 Dec 1985 Billboard that they intended to make a Three-Stooges-like comedy with the trio.
       Principal photography began on 3 Oct 1986 in the Los Angeles, CA, area, according to the 24 Oct 1986 DV production chart. The primary location used was the Kirkeby Estate in Bel Air, CA. The film’s budget was $5 million, according to the 9 Sep 1986 HR.
       Disorderlies opened on 14 Aug 1987 on 544 screens, earning $2.7 million in its first three days of release, according to the 18 Aug 1987 DV box office report.

      End credits include “special thanks” to Ralph E. Winters and Robert Hyams.

              End credits also state: "Access Stair Climbing Wheelchair courtesy of Natco Medical Corp.; Video Equipment courtesy of Panasonic Industrial Co.; Safe Security Device courtesy of Pinkerton; Balloons courtesy of Phil Thomas’ Fantasyworld; Amiga Computers courtesy of Commodore Business ... More Less


       Disorderlies marked the first starring role for successful Brooklyn, New York-based rap group The Fat Boys. Promotional material in AMPAS library files indicates the screenplay was inspired by the off-stage antics of the three rap music performers. Screenwriters Mark Feldberg and Mitchell Klebanoff toured with the Fat Boys in order to tailor the script to their personalities. Director Michael Schultz told the 7 Dec 1985 Billboard that they intended to make a Three-Stooges-like comedy with the trio.
       Principal photography began on 3 Oct 1986 in the Los Angeles, CA, area, according to the 24 Oct 1986 DV production chart. The primary location used was the Kirkeby Estate in Bel Air, CA. The film’s budget was $5 million, according to the 9 Sep 1986 HR.
       Disorderlies opened on 14 Aug 1987 on 544 screens, earning $2.7 million in its first three days of release, according to the 18 Aug 1987 DV box office report.

      End credits include “special thanks” to Ralph E. Winters and Robert Hyams.

              End credits also state: "Access Stair Climbing Wheelchair courtesy of Natco Medical Corp.; Video Equipment courtesy of Panasonic Industrial Co.; Safe Security Device courtesy of Pinkerton; Balloons courtesy of Phil Thomas’ Fantasyworld; Amiga Computers courtesy of Commodore Business Machines.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Billboard
7 Dec 1985.
---
Daily Variety
24 Oct 1986.
---
Daily Variety
17 Aug 1987
p. 2, 8.
Daily Variety
18 Aug 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Sep 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Aug 1987.
p. 3, 11.
Los Angeles Times
17 Aug 1987
p. 7.
New York Times
15 Aug 1987
p. 13.
Variety
19 Aug 1987
p. 16, 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. presents
A Michael Schultz Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Co-prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam op
Best boy
Elec
Key grip
Best boy
Grip
Still photog
Video playback
Video playback, Sync Lock
2d unit photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst to prod des
Asst to prod des
Art dept coord
Art asst
Art asst
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Assoc film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Asst dec
Leadman
Set dresser
Asst to dec
Const supv
Const foreman
Stand by carpenter
Stand by painter
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst pop master
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
MUSIC
Original score written and performed by
Mus ed
Orig score comp
Orig score comp
SOUND
Supv sd ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Boom op
The Looping Group
Re-rec
Dubbing rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Asst spec eff
Asst spec eff
Computer graphics
Computer graphics, Prism Graphics
Titles and opticals
Titles and opticals, CFI
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Fat Boys concept consultant
Project consultant
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Scr supv
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Prod accountant
Asst to Mr. Jaffe
Prod secy
Asst to prod
Casting asst
Extras casting
Asst to the Fat Boys
Asst to the Fat Boys
Security for The Fat Boys
Animal handler
Stuffed Chauncey creator
Police liaison
Garbologist
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Post prod
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
SOURCES
SONGS
“Rock Rulin’,” performed by the Fat Boys, produced by G. Rottger/co-produced by D. Robinson, D. Wimbley, the Fat Boys appear courtesy of Tin Pan Apple/Polydor Records, written by G. Rottger, D. Wimbley, D. Robinson, M. Morales, J. Glenn
“Disorderly Conduct," performed and produced by The Latin Rascals, the Latin Rascals appear courtesy of Tin Pan Apple/Polydor Records, written by Cabrera, Moran and Zarr
“Edge Of A Broken Heart,” performed by Bon Jovi, produced by Bruce Fairbairn, Bon Jovi appears courtesy of PolyGram Records, written by Jon Bon Jovi, Desmond Child, and Richard Sambora
+
SONGS
“Rock Rulin’,” performed by the Fat Boys, produced by G. Rottger/co-produced by D. Robinson, D. Wimbley, the Fat Boys appear courtesy of Tin Pan Apple/Polydor Records, written by G. Rottger, D. Wimbley, D. Robinson, M. Morales, J. Glenn
“Disorderly Conduct," performed and produced by The Latin Rascals, the Latin Rascals appear courtesy of Tin Pan Apple/Polydor Records, written by Cabrera, Moran and Zarr
“Edge Of A Broken Heart,” performed by Bon Jovi, produced by Bruce Fairbairn, Bon Jovi appears courtesy of PolyGram Records, written by Jon Bon Jovi, Desmond Child, and Richard Sambora
“Work Me Down, Down,” performed by Laura Hunter, produced by David Bryant and the Latin Rascals, Laura Hunter appears courtesy of Kloten Productions/Chrysalis Records, written by David Bryant/Diane Warren
“Roller One,” performed and produced by Art of Noise, Art of Noise appears courtesy of China/Chrysalis Records, written by Anne Dudley and J.J. Jeczalik
“Trying To Dance,” performed by Tom Kimmel, produced by Bill Szymczyk, Tom Kimmel appears courtesy of Mercury Records, written by Tom Kimmel
“Don’t Treat Me Like This,” performed by Anita, produced by R. DeBois, P. Van Asten, E. Wolff, Anita appears courtesy of 4-Tune Music/Tin Pan Apple/Polydor Records, written by Elliot Wolff
“Fat Off My Back,” performed and produced by Gwen Guthrie, Gwen Guthrie appears courtesy of Polydor Records, written by Gwen Guthrie
“Baby You’re A Rich Man,” performed by The Fat Boys, produced by Paul Gurvitz, The Fat Boys appear courtesy of Tin Pan Apple/Polydor Records, written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon
“I Heard A Rumor,” performed by Bananarama, produced by Stock, Aitken, Waterman, Bananarama appears courtesy of London Records and Polygram Records, written by Stock, Aitken, Waterman, Dalin, Fahey, Woordward
“Wipe Out,” performed by The Fat Boys and The Beach Boys, produced by The Latin Rascals in association with The Beach Boys, The Fat Boys appear courtesy of Tin Pan Apple/Polydor Records, The Beach Boys appear courtesy of Brother Records, Inc., written by Surfaris
“Big Money,” performed by Ca$hflow, produced by Larry Blackmon, Ca$hflow appears courtesy of Atlanta Artists/Mercury Records, written by Gaylord Parsons.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 August 1987
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 14 August 1987
Production Date:
began 3 October 1986
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros., Inc.
Copyright Date:
26 August 1987
Copyright Number:
PA341856
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
86
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26430
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Palm Beach, Florida, ne’er-do-well Winslow Lowry lives at the palatial estate of his millionaire uncle, wheelchair-bound Albert Dennison, who is near death but being cared for at the estate. When Albert dies, Winslow will inherit his fortune, but in the meantime, Albert’s nephew has accumulated $640,000 in debt to loan shark Luis Montana, who wants his money back. Winslow convinces Montana to give him three weeks to pay, then steps on Albert’s oxygen tube, causing his uncle’s condition to rapidly deteriorate. However, orderlies attend the old man and quickly stabilize him. Winslow decides the orderlies are too good, and sets out to find the worst orderlies in the country. After reading a newspaper article about the worst nursing home in America, Winslow goes there and hires Markie, Kool and Buffy. When the three orderlies arrive at the estate, Chauncey, the Doberman pinscher guard dog, barks furiously at them. Then George, the butler, shows them the mechanized pill dispenser they will use for all of Albert’s medicines. Initially, the three prove inept. When they attempt to use a mechanical lift to move Albert, the lift malfunctions and he is thrown into the swimming pool. Albert demands the new orderlies be fired, but Winslow insists they be given another chance. Deciding Albert needs a change of scenery, the three take him for a ride around town, but Albert sleeps throughout. They pick up three party girls on the street and go to a roller disco. Albert wakes up, likes the sudden attention of the ladies, and enjoys it as they push him around the roller rink in his wheelchair. When they return to the estate, Albert is perky and even ... +


In Palm Beach, Florida, ne’er-do-well Winslow Lowry lives at the palatial estate of his millionaire uncle, wheelchair-bound Albert Dennison, who is near death but being cared for at the estate. When Albert dies, Winslow will inherit his fortune, but in the meantime, Albert’s nephew has accumulated $640,000 in debt to loan shark Luis Montana, who wants his money back. Winslow convinces Montana to give him three weeks to pay, then steps on Albert’s oxygen tube, causing his uncle’s condition to rapidly deteriorate. However, orderlies attend the old man and quickly stabilize him. Winslow decides the orderlies are too good, and sets out to find the worst orderlies in the country. After reading a newspaper article about the worst nursing home in America, Winslow goes there and hires Markie, Kool and Buffy. When the three orderlies arrive at the estate, Chauncey, the Doberman pinscher guard dog, barks furiously at them. Then George, the butler, shows them the mechanized pill dispenser they will use for all of Albert’s medicines. Initially, the three prove inept. When they attempt to use a mechanical lift to move Albert, the lift malfunctions and he is thrown into the swimming pool. Albert demands the new orderlies be fired, but Winslow insists they be given another chance. Deciding Albert needs a change of scenery, the three take him for a ride around town, but Albert sleeps throughout. They pick up three party girls on the street and go to a roller disco. Albert wakes up, likes the sudden attention of the ladies, and enjoys it as they push him around the roller rink in his wheelchair. When they return to the estate, Albert is perky and even able to walk on his own. Winslow is upset, but Albert lies, telling his nephew they went to an all-night drug store. While Albert sleeps, Winslow tries to inject him with poison, but orderly Kool comes into the room before Winslow is able to carry out his plan. Winslow throws the syringe out the window, but it hits Chauncey, the guard dog, who dies. When the three orderlies play poker, they empty the pill dispenser and use the various pills for poker chips. However, when George, the butler, comes in, they hide evidence of the poker game in the tablecloth, which nurse Carla then throws away. When the pill dispenser signals it is time to give Albert his medicine, there are no pills to give him. The orderlies telephone for a refill, but the pharmacy is out of the medicine. The next morning when Albert does not wake up, everyone worries he is about to die. Winslow feigns despair, then telephones the funeral parlor to make arrangements. However, Albert wakes up and seems better than ever. After performing an examination, the doctor announces that Albert was being over medicated and is in good condition. Grateful that the orderlies’ blunder helped him get well, Albert promises never to fire them. He also teaches them how to play polo and promises to take then on safari, on a yachting cruise and out chasing women. Albert also starts jogging and going to the gymnasium. None of the orderlies have the stamina to keep up with him. When Albert goes to his walk-in vault off the cabana and gives the orderlies some of his treasury bonds, a jealous Winslow and his valet, Miguel, start plotting to murder Albert. The orderlies finds a secret security panel hidden behind Albert’s gun rack and start making a music video. However, the electricity goes out, forcing them to stop. The next morning when power is restored, the camera resumes recording just as Winslow comes into the room to telephone Luis Montana saying that he will have his money in a day. Winslow instructs Miguel to give the entire staff the day off, but the orderlies stay behind. Markie shows the video to nurse Carla, while Miguel lets two of Luis Montana’s men into the house. Meanwhile, orderlies Kool and Buffy climb atop the estate wall and watch the girls next door swim naked, but they fall off the wall and rush back to the estate, just as the police drive by and call on their loudspeaker for them to give themselves up. Meanwhile, Montana’s hit men are about to shoot Albert when they hear the police on the loudspeaker. In a panic, the hit men accidentally fire a shot into the wall, before escaping. Police search the house, find the bullet hole in the wall and arrest Kool and Buffy. After the police leave, Albert, Carla, and Markie return to the den where the homemade music video still plays on the television. Just as they enter the room, the videotape plays the portion where Winslow was making his telephone call. Realizing the video will clear his friends, Markie takes the tape, but trips and accidently throws the videocassette into the fireplace where it burns up. In jail, Kool and Buffy will not talk, so police threaten to use a “Florida Lie Detector,” a 300-pound white man with a baseball bat. After being hauled away in a police car, Buffy unravels a wire coat hanger, sticks it through the bars separating the front seat from the back seat, and pushes the gas pedal, crashing the police car into another vehicle. When the cops get out to investigate, Kool and Buffy use the coat hanger to steer the car away, and escape. Meanwhile, Winslow orders Albert to open his cabana vault at gunpoint. When he refuses, Winslow knocks Albert unconscious, then uses dynamite to blow open the vault. Once inside, Luis Montana and his man take all the cash, then leave. With Albert tied up nearby, Winslow sets a bomb to go off at the cabana. Winslow lights the extra-long fuse, then leaves. Kool and Buffy return and see the fuse burning. They jump into the swimming pool and create a splash which douses the fuse. They rush to save Albert. However, a spark remains and the fuse reignites. Albert, Kool and Buffy escape just before the cabana explodes. Hearing the explosion, Winslow thinks Albert is dead. He has Montana shoot him in the butt to make it look like a robbery. However, Albert arrives in time to witness this and has Winslow and Montana arrested. Winslow and Montana serve seven years in prison, then commit another crime together and serve another twenty years. Kool becomes a lifeguard and trains to swim the English Channel. Buffy goes to medical school and becomes a heart surgeon. Markie becomes a sex therapist. Albert marries a nurse and his five children.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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