Slumber Party Massacre II (1987)

R | 75 mins | Horror, Comedy | 16 October 1987

Director:

Deborah Brock

Writer:

Deborah Brock

Cinematographer:

Thomas L. Callaway

Editor:

William Flicker

Production Designer:

John Eng

Production Company:

New Concorde Pictures
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HISTORY

Slumber Party Massacre II marked the first big-screen starring role for actress Crystal Bernard, who had previously done guest appearances on many television shows and had been a regular for a season on the comedy series Happy Days (ABC, 15 Jan 1974-24 Sep 1984). The film also marked the screen debut for rock and roll singer Atanas Ilitch, who played the “Driller Killer.” Actors Scott Westmoreland and Patrick Lowe also made their screen debuts in the film.
       Although his name does not appear in the credits, the film is from producer Roger Corman, known for his low-cost productions. The 20 Aug 1987 DV reported a budget of $500,000.
       Principal photography began on 9 Jun 1987 in Los Angeles, CA, with the working title Don’t Let Go, according to the 8 Jul 1987 DV production chart. After production was completed, the title was changed to Go For It and Slumber Party Massacre, Part II, the 2 Oct 1987 HR announced, but it was later shortened to Slumber Party Massacre II.
       The film received a "token" theatrical release, opening in Los Angeles, on 16 Oct 1987, before being issued on home video, the 4 Nov 1987 Var reported.
       End credits state: “Special Thanks to: Jed Horovitz; Bruce Stubblefield; Colin Edwards; Frank Devany; Mark Root; West Ceusder; Brian Catalde; Paragon Homes Inc.; Ford Motor; Rogers and Cowan; Southwest Bell; Daryll White; Knotts Berry Farm; Oxy-10; Yamaha; Leeds Mobile; General Foods; Maxwell House Coffee; Attila; Tapestry Artists; Pepsi Cola; Cole of California; Nike; Cine Sound 5; Bill ... More Less

Slumber Party Massacre II marked the first big-screen starring role for actress Crystal Bernard, who had previously done guest appearances on many television shows and had been a regular for a season on the comedy series Happy Days (ABC, 15 Jan 1974-24 Sep 1984). The film also marked the screen debut for rock and roll singer Atanas Ilitch, who played the “Driller Killer.” Actors Scott Westmoreland and Patrick Lowe also made their screen debuts in the film.
       Although his name does not appear in the credits, the film is from producer Roger Corman, known for his low-cost productions. The 20 Aug 1987 DV reported a budget of $500,000.
       Principal photography began on 9 Jun 1987 in Los Angeles, CA, with the working title Don’t Let Go, according to the 8 Jul 1987 DV production chart. After production was completed, the title was changed to Go For It and Slumber Party Massacre, Part II, the 2 Oct 1987 HR announced, but it was later shortened to Slumber Party Massacre II.
       The film received a "token" theatrical release, opening in Los Angeles, on 16 Oct 1987, before being issued on home video, the 4 Nov 1987 Var reported.
       End credits state: “Special Thanks to: Jed Horovitz; Bruce Stubblefield; Colin Edwards; Frank Devany; Mark Root; West Ceusder; Brian Catalde; Paragon Homes Inc.; Ford Motor; Rogers and Cowan; Southwest Bell; Daryll White; Knotts Berry Farm; Oxy-10; Yamaha; Leeds Mobile; General Foods; Maxwell House Coffee; Attila; Tapestry Artists; Pepsi Cola; Cole of California; Nike; Cine Sound 5; Bill Hudson; Crown Villas; Randy Rudnick; Portefino Condos; Perrier; New York Seltzer; Ramona, Vincent, & James Pavis; Unique Product Placement; Let It Rock Clothes; Shadow Spreaders International; Rhino Records; Warrant Publicity.”
       A disclaimer reads: "Any unauthorized exhibition, distribution or copying of this film or any part thereof [including soundtrack] is an infringement of the relevant copyright and will subject the infringer to seer civil and criminal prosecution as well as a midnight visit from the Driller-Killer." More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
8 Jul 1987.
---
Daily Variety
20 Aug 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Oct 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
16 Oct 1987
Calendar, p. 8.
Variety
4 Nov 1987
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr/1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam/Addl cam op
2d asst cam
Key grip
Best boy/Dolly grip
Grip/Elec
Shadowspreader grip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec/Props
Asst props
Asst set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp
SOUND
Sd mixer
Add sd mixer/Boom op
Boom op
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Postprod sd services
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff prod
Spec eff mgr
Lead sculptor/Mold maker
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Spec makeup eff des and created by
Makeup/Hair
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Insert car
Prod supv
Post prod supv
Prod accountant
Promotional coord
Pub
Asst to Deborah Brock
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col and processsing
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the film Slumber Party Massacre by Amy Jones (Santa Fe Productions, 1982).
AUTHOR
SONGS
“Tokyo Convertible,” from the “Man Alive” album, written by John Coinman, China Hill Music [ASCAP], courtesy of China Records
“If Only,” performed by Wednesday Week from the album “What We Had,” written by Kristi Callan and Kelly Callan, Powder Milk Music [BMI], Wednesday Week courtesy of Enigma Records
“Don’t Let Go,” written by Michael Monagan, Sassity Music Publishing Co. [BMI]
+
SONGS
“Tokyo Convertible,” from the “Man Alive” album, written by John Coinman, China Hill Music [ASCAP], courtesy of China Records
“If Only,” performed by Wednesday Week from the album “What We Had,” written by Kristi Callan and Kelly Callan, Powder Milk Music [BMI], Wednesday Week courtesy of Enigma Records
“Don’t Let Go,” written by Michael Monagan, Sassity Music Publishing Co. [BMI]
“Hell’s Cafe,” written by Gregory Lee Schilling, performed by Hell’s Cafe, courtesy Fallen Angel Management, copyright © 1986 Gregory Lee Schilling
“Why,” performed by Wednesday Week from the album “What We Had,” written by Heidi Rodewald, Frolic Room Music [BMI], Wednesday Week courtesy of Enigma Records
“Let’s Buzz,” written John Juke Logan, Jukes Music [BMI]
“Can’t Stop [Lovin’ You]” written by Sterling E. Smith, Spunky Genius Music [BMI].
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Don't Let Go
Go For It
Slumber Party Massacre Part II
Release Date:
16 October 1987
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 16 October 1987
Production Date:
began 9 June 1987
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
75
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28834
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

High school student Courtney Bates has recurring dreams about the “Driller Killer” using his electric drill to kill the people she cares about. Courtney’s mother tells her it is perfectly normal to have dreams of frightening experiences. Mrs. Bates realizes that the incident when Courtney was twelve years old and the Driller Killer attacked her sister, Valerie, certainly qualifies as a frightening experience, and offers to take her to a psychiatrist. However, Courtney declines, assuring her mother that she will be alright. Valerie has been a patient at a mental institution since the Driller Killer incident, but Courtney is too ashamed to tell her friends, so she lies and says that Valerie is at college in Northern California. Courtney is still a virgin and has never dated anyone seriously, but she is drawn to Matt Arbicost, a handsome boy at school, and invites him to the rehearsal of her all-girl band. Matt is impressed by their sound and afterward kisses Courtney. Mrs. Bates agrees to let Courtney spend her seventeenth birthday weekend with her friends at a Desert Springs, California, condominium owned by bandmate Shelia Barrington’s father. Before leaving for the condo, Courtney has another nightmare about the Driller Killer, and of her sister, Valerie, warning her not to have sex. When they arrive at the condo, Courtney, Amy, Sally, and Shelia find the complex is still under construction. Few of the condos have been completed and only a handful are occupied. Nonetheless, they try to make the best of the weekend and break into the liquor cabinet. As they drink, they talk about becoming a successful band with a hit song. Eventually, the girls take off their bras ... +


High school student Courtney Bates has recurring dreams about the “Driller Killer” using his electric drill to kill the people she cares about. Courtney’s mother tells her it is perfectly normal to have dreams of frightening experiences. Mrs. Bates realizes that the incident when Courtney was twelve years old and the Driller Killer attacked her sister, Valerie, certainly qualifies as a frightening experience, and offers to take her to a psychiatrist. However, Courtney declines, assuring her mother that she will be alright. Valerie has been a patient at a mental institution since the Driller Killer incident, but Courtney is too ashamed to tell her friends, so she lies and says that Valerie is at college in Northern California. Courtney is still a virgin and has never dated anyone seriously, but she is drawn to Matt Arbicost, a handsome boy at school, and invites him to the rehearsal of her all-girl band. Matt is impressed by their sound and afterward kisses Courtney. Mrs. Bates agrees to let Courtney spend her seventeenth birthday weekend with her friends at a Desert Springs, California, condominium owned by bandmate Shelia Barrington’s father. Before leaving for the condo, Courtney has another nightmare about the Driller Killer, and of her sister, Valerie, warning her not to have sex. When they arrive at the condo, Courtney, Amy, Sally, and Shelia find the complex is still under construction. Few of the condos have been completed and only a handful are occupied. Nonetheless, they try to make the best of the weekend and break into the liquor cabinet. As they drink, they talk about becoming a successful band with a hit song. Eventually, the girls take off their bras and get into a pillow fight, as two of their friends, Jeff and T. J., watch from outside. That night, Courtney has a dream of the Driller Killer murdering her sister, Valerie, and proclaiming he wants to make love to her. The next day, Courtney has strange visions of things attacking her, which her friends dismiss as a hangover. When she takes a bath, she sees that blood is coming out of the faucet and flooding the bathroom. She rushes to get Sally, who shows her that it is merely water overflowing the tub, not blood. However, when Sally notices a pimple on her face, Courtney sees Sally’s face explode. Matt and Jeff accuse T. J. of giving Courtney drugs, but he denies it. Courtney becomes nervous when Sally is missing and they hear a crunching sound in the trash compactor and fear it is Sally’s body. They telephone police who arrive moments before Sally returns to the condo from buying acne cream. Police warn them against making any more prank calls. Later, Matt brings Courtney a birthday cake and lights the candles. He knows about the incident with the Driller Killer and how upsetting that must have been to witness. They start kissing, but Courtney gets nervous, saying she has never had sex before. She imagines the Driller Killer running his electric drill through Matt. Courtney runs downstairs to get help and the Driller Killer follows. This time it is not Courtney’s imagination; the killer is real and Matt is really dead. The Diller Killer wears a black leather ensemble and fancies himself a rock and roll musician, carrying a large guitar with an electric drill on the handle. The killer runs his drill through Sally, and cuts the phone line. The others run out of the house in different directions. However, Amy, Jeff, and Courtney go back to get the car keys and discover Sally’s body. They rush to the car and drive away, but the Driller Killer is hiding in the back seat and drills through Jeff. The girls run back to the house. Meanwhile, T. J. and Amy go to the only other house that seems to be occupied, begging for help. However, before the owner can answer the door, the killer murders T. J. Courtney gets to another telephone and calls police, who think it is another prank call and warn them not to phone again. The killer drills through Shelia, then drills through the bedroom door to get to Amy and Courtney, who climb onto the roof to get away. He catches Amy and comes after Courtney. With a blow torch, she lights the Driller Killer on fire. He falls from the roof and is killed. When daylight comes, police and ambulances arrive to take away the dead, but then Courtney wakes up in bed beside Matt. However, a moment later she has another dream about the Driller Killer. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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