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HISTORY

       The 10 Jul 1985 Var announced the $3 million independent picture, previously titled, Rap Attack, was slated for a 23 Aug 1985 premiere. However, the opening was delayed.
       Var production charts from 17 Jul 1985 reported principal photography began 6 May 1985 in New York City.
       According to the 15 Nov 1985 BAM, the idea for the film came from executive producer George Jackson, after he read an article in the Oct 1984 Wall Street Journal about a financially successful hip-hop/rap music tour. He contacted director Michael Schultz and the two attended the “Fresh Festival Tour,” along with writer Ralph Farquhar, with plans to shoot a concert movie about the rap genre. However, the artists they spoke with expressed interest in filming a scripted picture, not a concert film. Filmmakers had a mere six months to write, produce, and film the picture before several of the performers would be on the road for scheduled tours.
       The 15 Nov 1985 BAM reported Columbia Pictures Corp. was backing the film for several weeks before fears of previous unsuccessful music pictures prompted them to drop the project. Warner Bros. agreed to fund the low-budget picture, following the success of their music film, Purple Rain (1984, see entry).
       Krush Groove filmed for twenty-six days in New York City, with locations in Manhattan, the Bronx, Queens, and Silvercup Studios, according to the 6 Nov 1985 DV. Director Schultz’s wife, Gloria Schultz served as acting coach to the musicians, as actor Blair Underwood was the only leading ... More Less

       The 10 Jul 1985 Var announced the $3 million independent picture, previously titled, Rap Attack, was slated for a 23 Aug 1985 premiere. However, the opening was delayed.
       Var production charts from 17 Jul 1985 reported principal photography began 6 May 1985 in New York City.
       According to the 15 Nov 1985 BAM, the idea for the film came from executive producer George Jackson, after he read an article in the Oct 1984 Wall Street Journal about a financially successful hip-hop/rap music tour. He contacted director Michael Schultz and the two attended the “Fresh Festival Tour,” along with writer Ralph Farquhar, with plans to shoot a concert movie about the rap genre. However, the artists they spoke with expressed interest in filming a scripted picture, not a concert film. Filmmakers had a mere six months to write, produce, and film the picture before several of the performers would be on the road for scheduled tours.
       The 15 Nov 1985 BAM reported Columbia Pictures Corp. was backing the film for several weeks before fears of previous unsuccessful music pictures prompted them to drop the project. Warner Bros. agreed to fund the low-budget picture, following the success of their music film, Purple Rain (1984, see entry).
       Krush Groove filmed for twenty-six days in New York City, with locations in Manhattan, the Bronx, Queens, and Silvercup Studios, according to the 6 Nov 1985 DV. Director Schultz’s wife, Gloria Schultz served as acting coach to the musicians, as actor Blair Underwood was the only leading actor in the film with dramatic training. Attempts were made to keep the rappers language authentic, but the heavily laden street slang needed re-working for the “uninitiated” to understand, as reported by DV. The picture premiered 25 Oct 1985.
      End credits include the following acknowledgements: “The Russell Walker character was inspired by the life of Russell Simmons,” and “The producers wish to thank: Jac Holzman, Don Asquith, Clarence Avant, Douglas Rosen, Charles Stettler, Unique Products Placement, Sal Abbatiello, Drake’s Cakes, Sbarro, Advertising In Movies, International Blimpie, Crazy Eddie, Silvercup Studios, Casio Electronics, Adidas USA, The New York City Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BAM
15 Nov 1985
p. 24.
Daily Variety
6 Nov 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Oct 1985
p. 3, 21.
Los Angeles Times
25 Oct 1985
p. 12.
New York Times
25 Oct 1985
p. 8.
Variety
10 Jul 1985.
---
Variety
17 Jul 1985.
---
Variety
30 Oct 1985
p. 19, 22.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Doug McHenry Crystalite Production
A Michael Schultz Film
Produced in association with Film Development and Visual Eyes Productions
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
Key 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story consultant
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d unit cam op
Addl cam op
Addl cam op
Addl asst cam
Addl asst cam
Best boy
Addl gaffer
Key grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst to prod des
Asst to prod des
Prod asst, art
Prod asst, art
Prod asst, art
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Const coord
Master scenic artist
Set dec
Standby scenic artist
Standby carpenter
Prop master
Set dresser
Set dresser
COSTUMES
Ward supv
Ward asst
Ward asst
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus coord
Mus consultant
SOUND
Boom op
Video and digital audio tech
Prod asst, sd
Prod asst, sd
Prod asst, sd
Re-rec engineer
Re-rec engineer
Re-rec engineer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Opticals and titles by
DANCE
Choreog
Addl choreog, "If I Ruled The World"
MAKEUP
Makeup and hair des
Makeup and hair for Sheila E.
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Acting coach
Asst to prods
Post prod supv
Post prod coord
Spec consultant, Danceteria seq
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Loc asst
Asst prod coord
Preprod coord
Prods office asst
Scr supv
Extras casting dir
Casting asst
Extras casting and promotional products coord
Transportation capt
Transportation coord
Prod auditor
Asst prod auditor
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Post-prod video system des by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“King Of Rock,” performed by Run-DMC, written by Larry Smith, Joseph Simmons, Daryll McDaniels, available exclusively on Profile Records
“Don’t You Dog Me,” performed by The Fat Boys, written by Mark Morales, Darren “Buffy” Robinson, Damon Wimbley, courtesy of Sutra Records
“A Love Bizarre,” performed by Sheila E., written and arranged by Sheila E. and Prince, courtesy of Paisley Park
+
SONGS
“King Of Rock,” performed by Run-DMC, written by Larry Smith, Joseph Simmons, Daryll McDaniels, available exclusively on Profile Records
“Don’t You Dog Me,” performed by The Fat Boys, written by Mark Morales, Darren “Buffy” Robinson, Damon Wimbley, courtesy of Sutra Records
“A Love Bizarre,” performed by Sheila E., written and arranged by Sheila E. and Prince, courtesy of Paisley Park
“Pick Up The Pace,” performed by UTFO, written by UTFO and Full Force, courtesy of Select Records
“If I Ruled The World,” performed by Kurtis Blow, music by Kurtis Blow and David Reeves, lyrics by Kurtis Blow and AJ Scratch
“Holly Rock,” performed by Sheila E. courtesy of Paisley Park
“It’s Like That,” performed by Run-DMC, written by Larry Smith, Joseph Simmons, Daryll McDaniels, available exclusively on Profile Records
“Feel The Spin,” performed by Debbie Harry, written by Debbie Harry, Jellybean and Toni C.
“I Can’t Live Without My Radio,” performed by LL Cool J, written by James Todd Smith and Rick Rubin
“Please Don’t Go,” performed by Nayobe, written by Andy Panda Tripoli, courtesy of Sutra Records
“My Secret,” performed by New Edition, written by Bobby Hart and Dick Eastman, courtesy of MCA Records
“She’s On It,” performed by The Beastie Boys, written by Adam Horovitz and Rick Rubin
“Pump It Up – Let’s Get Funky,” performed by The Fat Boys, music by Kurtis Blow and David Reeves, lyrics by Mark Morales, Darren “Buffy” Robinson, Damon Wimbley, courtesy of Sutra Records
“All You Can Eat,” performed by The Fat Boys, music by Kurtis Blow, lyrics by Mark Morales, Darren “Buffy” Robinson, Damon Wimbley, “I Want You To Be My Girl,” performed by Chad, written by Morris Levy and Richard Barrett, courtesy of Big Seven Music Corp.
“Fat Boys,” performed by The Fat Boys, music by Kurtis Blow, lyrics by Mark Morales, Darren “Buffy” Robinson, Damon Wimbley, courtesy of Sutra Records
“Can You Rock It Like This,” performed by Run-DMC, written by James Todd Smith, Rick Rubin, Larry Smith, available exclusively on Profile Records
“Tender Love, “ performed by Force M.D.’s, written by James Harris, III and Terry Lewis
“Love Triangle,” performed by The Gap Band, written by Lonnie Simmons
“You’re Blind,” performed by Run-DMC, written by Larry Smith, Tony Rome, Russell Simmons, Daryll McDaniels, available exclusively on Profile Records
“Kold Krush,” performed by Autumn, written by Geo Cooper, courtesy of Compleat Records
“Krush Groovin’,” performed by The Fat Boys, Run-DMC, Sheila E., and Kurtis Blow, written by Russell Simmons, Kurtis Blow, Rick Rubin, Joseph Simmons, Daryll McDaniels, Mark Morales, Darren “Buffy” Robinson, and Damon Wimbley
“Can’t Stop The Street,” performed by Chaka Khan, written by Dan Hartman and Charlie Midnight.
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Rap Attack
Release Date:
25 October 1985
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 25 October 1985
Production Date:
6 May--June 1985 in New York City
Copyright Claimant:
Blitz Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
16 July 1986
Copyright Number:
PA307729
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
94
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27860
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At up and coming Krush Groove Records in New York City, rap artists “Run-DMC” records an album. High school rappers, the “Disco Three,” made up of Prince Markie D., Kool Rock Ski, and the Human Beat Box, hear their song on the radio, and dream of following in Run-DMC’s success. The boys are sent to the principal’s office for misbehaving in class, but instead perform an impromptu rap in the hallway for their classmates. After receiving an order for 10,000 copies of his brother “Run” Walker’s record, Krush Groove founder, Russell Walker, asks his father, Reverend Walker, for $5,000 to invest in his fledgling company. Reverend Walker denies him the loan, and suggests that God is testing him to solve his own problems. Later, Russell, Run, and DMC attend a performance by Sheila E., and Russell is approached by a businessman named Jay B., who offers to help him. However, club owner, Sal, warns Russell to stay clear of the man. Run invites Sheila to join him and DMC for a drink, and when Russell is introduced to Sheila, they become infatuated. Outside the club, the underage “Disco Three” are denied entrance. They convince the bouncer to allow them inside to perform, but the boys leave when they cannot afford the $10 dollar cover charge. Sometime later, Russell and his business partner, Rick, apply for a bank loan, but are denied. Russell secretly visits Jay B. and procures the money, but does not tell Rick where it came from. The records of Run-DMC and fellow Krush Groove artist, Kurtis Blow, become hits, and Krush Groove gains success. ... +


At up and coming Krush Groove Records in New York City, rap artists “Run-DMC” records an album. High school rappers, the “Disco Three,” made up of Prince Markie D., Kool Rock Ski, and the Human Beat Box, hear their song on the radio, and dream of following in Run-DMC’s success. The boys are sent to the principal’s office for misbehaving in class, but instead perform an impromptu rap in the hallway for their classmates. After receiving an order for 10,000 copies of his brother “Run” Walker’s record, Krush Groove founder, Russell Walker, asks his father, Reverend Walker, for $5,000 to invest in his fledgling company. Reverend Walker denies him the loan, and suggests that God is testing him to solve his own problems. Later, Russell, Run, and DMC attend a performance by Sheila E., and Russell is approached by a businessman named Jay B., who offers to help him. However, club owner, Sal, warns Russell to stay clear of the man. Run invites Sheila to join him and DMC for a drink, and when Russell is introduced to Sheila, they become infatuated. Outside the club, the underage “Disco Three” are denied entrance. They convince the bouncer to allow them inside to perform, but the boys leave when they cannot afford the $10 dollar cover charge. Sometime later, Russell and his business partner, Rick, apply for a bank loan, but are denied. Russell secretly visits Jay B. and procures the money, but does not tell Rick where it came from. The records of Run-DMC and fellow Krush Groove artist, Kurtis Blow, become hits, and Krush Groove gains success. Russell is offered $20,000 by Terri Beiker to sell his artists to Galaxy Records, but he turns the offer down. At a Run-DMC performance, Run invites Sheila E. onstage to help promote her career. Russell is not pleased with the unplanned performance, although the audience responds enthusiastically. Run and Russell argue, and Russell orders his brother to take the stage. The rift continues after the show, and Run takes another blow when Sheila denies his advances, saying he is more like a brother to her. Sheila then tells Russell there is nothing romantic between her and Run, and Russell offers to drive her home. Outside the club, Run is courted by Beiker to come to the more successful Galaxy Records. Run is upset when he sees Sheila and Russell leaving together. Meanwhile, the Disco Three enter a talent contest with a chance to win a Krush Groove recording deal. Run reports to the others at the record company that Russell turned down a lucrative contract with Galaxy Records without discussing it with anyone. At the talent contest, Jay B. demands repayment from Russell, who is given a week to comply. As the Disco Three perform, Russell speaks to Beiker, and agrees to accept the deal for more money. However, Beiker informs him that he has already signed Run-DMC to Galaxy Records. Having no signed contract, Russell has no rights to Run-DMC. Run enters, and Russell physically attacks his brother. The finalists of the talent contest are announced, and the Disco Three is not among them. However, Kurtis Blow offers them a chance to perform as alternates in case other performers fail to attend the finals. Later, Kurtis visits Russell and admits he was also offered a contract with Galaxy Records. Russell tells him to accept the $500,000 deal, as Krush Groove is struggling. The Disco Three changes their name to the more fitting “The Fat Boys.” After losing his artists to Galaxy Records, Russell realizes he can save his company by recording Sheila, and repaying Jay B. Later, Sal refuses to play Sheila’s record in his club because he fears involvement with Jay B. At the finals for the talent contest, a group drops out, and The Fat Boys take their place. The crowd responds, and the group wins first prize. Russell struggles to get Sheila’s record played in clubs, and is beaten up by Jay B.’s henchmen. When he seeks shelter at Sheila’s home, the two make love. Despite his new financial success, Kurtis feels guilty for leaving his longtime friend, Russell, and fails to convince Run that they should team up with Russell again. Run visits Sheila, and she pleads with him to help Russell with his money troubles, but Run’s jealousy makes him reluctant. Sheila reprimands his selfish behavior, and Run goes to see Russell, finds him being beaten by Jay B.’s men, and is also punched when he tries to intervene. The henchmen threaten to return everyday until they receive full payment. Run apologizes to his brother, and gives him the money to repay Jay B. He asks Russell to be his manager at Galaxy Records. Later, everyone meets at Sal’s club to celebrate The Fat Boys’ win, and the reuniting of Russell with Run-DMC and Kurtis Blow. All of the artists, including Sheila, perform a song. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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