The Sicilian (1987)

R | 115 mins | Drama | 23 October 1987

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HISTORY

The Sicilian is based on the 1984 best-selling novel of the same name by Mario Puzo about Salvatore Giuliano, a real-life bandit in post World War II Sicily who attained hero status for robbing from the government, the mafia, and the aristocrats to help the poor people of the island. The novel is considered a literary sequel to Puzo’s 1969 novel, The Godfather, because the Corleone mafia family figures heavily in the story, especially the character of “Michael Corleone.”
       On 20 Mar 1985, HR announced that producer David Begelman won the highly sought after film rights to The Sicilian, paying $2 million to Puzo. Begelman, who planned to produce the film under the banner of his Gladden Entertainment Corporation, hoped to begin production in late 1985, the 27 Feb 1985 LAHExam reported. Begelman said that “Michael Corleone” would not be part of the film because Paramount Pictures held the film rights to the character, who was played by actor Al Pacino in The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather, Part II (1974), and eventually, The Godfather, Part III (1990, see entries).
       However, Begelman did try to entice Godfather actor Marlon Brando, who played “Vito Corleone,” to join The Sicilian as the mafia lord, “Don Masino Croce.” The 7 Mar 1986 DV reported Begelman offered Brando $5 million for three weeks of work on the film. When Brando turned him down, Begelman cast British actor Joss Ackland, but for considerably less money, the 5 Jul 1986 Screen International reported.
       Begelman hired ... More Less

The Sicilian is based on the 1984 best-selling novel of the same name by Mario Puzo about Salvatore Giuliano, a real-life bandit in post World War II Sicily who attained hero status for robbing from the government, the mafia, and the aristocrats to help the poor people of the island. The novel is considered a literary sequel to Puzo’s 1969 novel, The Godfather, because the Corleone mafia family figures heavily in the story, especially the character of “Michael Corleone.”
       On 20 Mar 1985, HR announced that producer David Begelman won the highly sought after film rights to The Sicilian, paying $2 million to Puzo. Begelman, who planned to produce the film under the banner of his Gladden Entertainment Corporation, hoped to begin production in late 1985, the 27 Feb 1985 LAHExam reported. Begelman said that “Michael Corleone” would not be part of the film because Paramount Pictures held the film rights to the character, who was played by actor Al Pacino in The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather, Part II (1974), and eventually, The Godfather, Part III (1990, see entries).
       However, Begelman did try to entice Godfather actor Marlon Brando, who played “Vito Corleone,” to join The Sicilian as the mafia lord, “Don Masino Croce.” The 7 Mar 1986 DV reported Begelman offered Brando $5 million for three weeks of work on the film. When Brando turned him down, Begelman cast British actor Joss Ackland, but for considerably less money, the 5 Jul 1986 Screen International reported.
       Begelman hired Academy Award-winning director Michael Cimino to helm the film, the 3 Feb 1986 HR announced. The director became available when producer Dino De Laurentiis canceled the film adaptation of the Truman Capote novella, Hand Carved Coffins.
       The 19 May 1986 DV reported that Begelman planned to finance seventy-five percent of the film through a deal between Gladden Entertainment and Britain’s Thorn EMI Screen Entertainment. Under the terms of the deal, which was set up in 1984, Thorn EMI would partially finance nine of Gladden’s films in exchange for all theatrical distribution rights outside of North America and all home video rights worldwide, the 30 May 1986 DV explained. When Cannon Pictures purchased Thorn EMI in May 1986, however, Cannon’s chairman, Menahem Golan, balked at funding The Sicilian, the 14 May 1986 Var reported. Citing the lack of stars and the presence of Michael Cimino, a director with a reputation for going over budget and over schedule after Heaven’s Gate (1980, see entry), Golan said there was “no protection on the downside” of the film, which had a projected $23 million budget. The 27 May 1986 DV reported the deal favored Gladden too heavily, with Cannon financing most of the cost, but not seeing any return until after Begelman had received several million in profit.
       When Cannon refused to honor the deal, Begelman sued for $100 million for breach of contract, the 28 May 1986 HR reported. Many assumed the picture would be put on hold, but Begelman announced he intended to start production in Jul 1986 as originally scheduled, the 30 May 1986 DV reported. In Aug 1986, Cannon and Begelman settled the dispute and the suit was dropped, as stated in the 13 Aug 1986 Var reported. Nearly two weeks later, the 25 Aug 1986 DV reported that the De Laurentiis Entertainment Group picked up worldwide distribution rights outside of North America.
       Principal photography began in Sicily on 14 Jul 1986, according to a 23 Jul 1986 DV production chart. Promotional materials in AMPAS library files indicate the film shot extensively in the capital city of Palermo as well as in the mountains of western Sicily. The medieval town of Caltabellotta doubled as the town of Montelepre, while an 18th century manor house in Grammichele served as “Camilla, Duchess of Crotene’s” country home. Barred from using the Ucciadone Prison, jail cell interiors were recreated at the 15th century Santa Maria del Bosco, and the abduction sequence was shot at the Byzantine Cathedral of Monreale. The 15 Jul 1986 HR noted that the set was closed throughout filming and the 22 May 1987 NYT listed the budget at $17 million, with $8.5 million dedicated to production and the rest going to above-the-line costs, including Cimino’s $2.5 million salary and Begelman’s $1 million salary as producer, although Begelman’s name is not included in onscreen credits.
       Production ended in Sep 1986 and shortly thereafter, Cimino turned in a 155-minute rough cut of the film, the 27 Oct 1987 DV reported. Begelman was pleased, but told him to trim the running time. While Cimino was contractually guaranteed the final cut of the film, he was also required to turn in a cut that was between 105 and 125 minutes long. Gladden had a ten-picture distribution deal with Twentieth Century Fox for films that had a running time between 96 and 120 minutes, but Begelman believed he could likely convince Fox to distribute The Sicilian with a running time as long as 130 minutes. Anything longer than 130 minutes would limit the number of screenings per day and thereby reduce its box-office grosses.
       In Mar 1987, Cimino showed Begelman a 143-minute version of the movie, along with a 125-minute black and white cut. In the shorter cut, several major action sequences were eliminated, including a massacre scene which was a dramatic turning point in the film. Begelman said he considered the shorter version to be a “bad joke.” Bertram Fields, an attorney for Gladden, told the 21 May 1987 LAT that he believed Cimino turned in an inferior shorter version as a way to force Gladden and Fox to accept his longer cut. Begelman ordered Cimino to work harder on the shorter version, but by his 1 May 1987 deadline, the director was still offering two versions, the 143-minute cut and a 121-minute cut. When Gladden tried to re-edit the film, Cimino filed a lawsuit to stop them. The 22 May 1987 NYT noted Cimino’s suit also claimed that his contract guaranteed two test screenings of his longer version, but Gladden never gave him those screenings.
       A month-long Directors Guild of America (DGA) hearing followed with many directors explaining what “final cut” means, but Cimino lost the hearing. The arbitrator ruled that Cimino did not consult closely enough with Begelman as his contract stipulated, the 30 Jul 1987 Long Beach Press-Telegram reported. Gladden was allowed to re-edit the film without Cimino’s input, but the 4 Sep 1987 LAT reported that Gladden and Fox worked to conceal the name of the editor they hired, hoping to give the impression that this was still Cimino’s film. The LAT noted “rumors” that the editing was completed by an established, well-known director. However, test screenings of the shortened version were “disappointing.”
       In marketing the film, Twentieth Century Fox emphasized that it was based on Mario Puzo’s book, but could not mention The Godfather since Paramount held the rights to those films, the 4 Sep 1987 LAT reported. The marketing also emphasized that it was Michael Cimino’s film, and the director passively added his support by not speaking against the film.
       A 115-minute version of The Sicilian opened on 370 screens on 23 Oct 1987, earning a respectable $1.7 million in its opening weekend, according to a 27 Oct 1987 DV box-office report. However, the film’s box-office grosses dropped drastically to $787,472 during its second weekend, the 3 Nov 1987 DV reported. The 12 Nov 1987 LAT attributed the decrease in sales to poor word of mouth and bad reviews, noting that by the third weekend, the film was playing on just 170 screens.
       Reviews were negative. The 23 Oct 1987 NYT called the film a “mess,” while the 23 Oct 1987 LAT characterized it as “fuzzy and inert.” A 21 Oct 1987 DV review commented that the film was “botched,” noting, “what unfolds onscreen feels flat, unexciting and unconvincing, and lacking in the great texture and memorable scenes that have thus far graced even Cimino’s most problematic films.” The 23 Oct 1987 HR remarked the film was “a catastrophe, a stylish epic sabotaged by butcher-block editing (the film is said to be have been trimmed by half an hour, but it feels as if two hours are missing), an often unintentionally amusing script and the casting of Christopher Lambert in the lead, an actor who is utterly devoid of nuance and charisma.” The 22 Oct 1987 WSJ remarked that the film “may have made more sense before the director was ordered by his producer to edit the film down by one-third to a two-hour length. Maybe in an earlier version it was possible to follow the story. On the other hand, the dreadful performances Mr. Cimino has coaxed out of his actors would be even more noticeable if the movie were coherent.”
       While American audiences saw a shortened version, the film was released as 146 minutes in Europe, the 21 Oct 1987 Var reported. The print viewed by AFI for this record was 140 minutes. LA Weekly film critic F.X. Feeney flew to Paris, France, to view the longer version. In the 13 Nov 1987 edition, Feeney proclaimed, “the amputated thing being shown in [American] theaters now is a travesty,” and that it was “a masterpiece of executive sabotage.” Of the longer European version, he said, “One simply cannot imagine what’s missing – it’s too unique, it’s too original. Cimino has fashioned a grand entertainment – the buoyant, visionary ballad of a romantic outlaw – and suffused it with such wit, and such opulent narrative economy, that in its complete form the story resonates like a Stradivarius.” Feeney noted that four scenes and three major sequences, plus almost 100 lines of dialogue, were removed from the American version, including the scene where “Countess Camilla” seduces and beds “Giuliano.”
       A protracted dispute over the film’s writing credits also ensued. Novelist Steve Shagan, who had previously adapted several novels into screenplays, was originally hired to adapt Puzo’s novel. After Shagan turned in his script, Cimino revised it, then hired author Gore Vidal to do a final rewrite in spring 1986, the 14 Feb 1987 LAT reported. Vidal was in Sicily as filming began, doing a final polish of the script. However, in Dec 1986, when it came time to submit the writing credits to the Writers Guild of America (WGA), Gladden only turned in Shagan’s name, the 24 Oct 1987 LAHExam explained. Vidal protested and demanded a hearing. As is standard procedure in WGA hearings, three arbitrators, working independently of each other, reviewed each draft of the script and determined how to allocate the writing credits. WGA guidelines stated that any writer who contributes more than thirty-three percent of the script must receive onscreen credit, but the arbitrators ruled that only Shagan deserved credit. Vidal sued the WGA in Feb 1987, demanding to know the names of the three arbitrators, which were always kept confidential. This was the first time in decades that the WGA had been sued regarding writing credits, although later that year, Larry Ferguson also sued the WGA over the writing credits for Beverly Hills Cop II (1987, see entry).
       In Sep 1987, a judge ruled against Vidal, but the writer appealed and in Nov 1987, a Superior Court judge said that Vidal did have the right to know the names, the 10 Nov 1987 DV reported. The WGA appealed that ruling, and in Apr 1988, an appeals court judge decided that the writers’ union must reveal the names, according to the 15 Apr 1988 DV. By the time that ruling came, however, Vidal, Shagan, and the WGA had settled the dispute out of court and withdrawn the case, rendering the court’s decision moot.
       When Michael Cimino filed suit in May 1987 to prevent Gladden from editing his film, his lawsuit also demanded he receive a writing credit, the 20 May 1987 DV reported. No information could be found about the outcome of Cimino’s writing credit dispute, but he does not receive onscreen credit.
       The Sicilian marked the American film debuts for Italian actress Giulia Boschi, who played “Giovanna,” and German actress Barbara Sukowa, who played “Camilla.”
       End credits state: “With Special Thanks to: Conte Giuseppe Tasca D’Almerita; Marchesa Anna Lanza Di Mazzirino; Barone Giovanni Gagliardo Di Carpinello; Professor Leoluca Orlando, Mayor of Palermo; Maestro Ciavorello and Banda Dei Misteri di Trapani; Ignazio Garsia and the Big Band of the Brass Group.”
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
7 Mar 1986.
---
Daily Variety
19 May 1986.
---
Daily Variety
27 May 1986.
---
Daily Variety
30 May 1986
p. 1, 30.
Daily Variety
23 Jul 1986.
---
Daily Variety
25 Aug 1986.
---
Daily Variety
20 May 1987
p. 18.
Daily Variety
21 Oct 1987
p. 3, 19.
Daily Variety
27 Oct 1987
p. 5, 16, 18.
Daily Variety
27 Oct 1987.
---
Daily Variety
3 Nov 1987
p. 2.
Daily Variety
10 Nov 1987
p. 2, 13.
Daily Variety
15 Apr 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Mar 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Feb 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 May 1986
p. 1, 11.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 1987
p. 3, 38.
LA Weekly
13 Nov 1987
p. 36, 40.
Long Beach Press-Telegram
30 Jul 1987
Section B, p. 4.
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
27 Feb 1985.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
24 Oct 1987
Section B, p. 1, 5.
Los Angeles Times
14 Feb 1987
Section VI, p. 1, 10.
Los Angeles Times
21 May 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
4 Sep 1987
Section VI, p. 1, 19.
Los Angeles Times
23 Oct 1987
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
12 Nov 1987
Section VI, p. 1, 7.
New York Times
22 May 1987.
---
New York Times
23 Oct 1987
Section C, p. 4.
Screen International
5 Jul 1986.
---
Variety
14 May 1986
p. 5, 114.
Variety
13 Aug 1986.
---
Variety
21 Oct 1987
p. 9, 541.
Variety
21 Oct 1987
p. 15.
WSJ
22 Oct 1987.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Gladden Entertainment Corporation Presents
A Michael Cimino Film
A Sidney Beckerman Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog and op
2d unit dir of photog
Key grip
Gaffer
Best boy
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
Cam loader
Stills photog
Cam by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Assoc ed
1st asst ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
Armourer
Set dresser
Const coord
Standby painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Actor's costumes made by
Women's ward
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
Mus arr
Performed by
Mafilm Studios, Budapest
SOUND
Rec eng
Boom op
Cable man
Sd mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Opticals
Titles des
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Barbara Sukowa's and Giulia Boschi's makeup des
Barbara Sukowa's and Giulia Boschi's hair styled
Chief makeup artist
Asst makeup
Spec eff makeup
Christopher Lambert's hair styled by
Hairstylist
Asst hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec in charge of prod
Casting
Scr supv
Boss wrangler
Prod assoc
Spec Sicilian prod coord
Spec Sicilian prod coord
Transportation coord
Prod supv
Prod mgr
Prod mgr
Dial coach
Dial coach
Dial coach
Dial coach
Loc casting
Extras casting
Wrangler
Wrangler
City of Palermo liaison
Financial consultant
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Unit pub
Public relations representative
(United States and Canada)
Public relations representative
(International)
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Sicilian by Mario Puzo (New York, 1984).
AUTHOR
SONGS
“La Golondrina,” arrangement by Don Swan
“Chica, Chica, Boom, Chic,” by Harry Warren, Mack Gordon
"Chattanooga Choo Choo,” by Mack Gordon, Harry Warren
+
SONGS
“La Golondrina,” arrangement by Don Swan
“Chica, Chica, Boom, Chic,” by Harry Warren, Mack Gordon
"Chattanooga Choo Choo,” by Mack Gordon, Harry Warren
“Jumpin’ At The Woodside,” by William “Count” Basie
“Dio Che Nell’alma Infondere Amor,” from Don Carlo by Giuseppe Verdi, sung by Enrico Caruso & Antonio Scotti, R.C.A. Records
“Sonata In F Minor for Harpsichord,” (Longo #187) by Domenico Scarlatti
“A String Of Pearls,” by Jerry Gray
“In The Mood,” by Joe Garland
L’Internazionale,” by Pierre Degeyter, Adolphe Degeyter & Eugene Pottier.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 October 1987
Premiere Information:
New York and Los Angeles openings: 23 October 1987
Production Date:
14 July--September 1986
Copyright Claimant:
Gladden Entertainment Corporation
Copyright Date:
12 November 1987
Copyright Number:
PA351143
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Prints
Prints by DeLuxe
Duration(in mins):
115
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28590
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In late 1940s Sicily, a handsome, rebellious bandit in his mid-twenties named Salvatore Giuliano is viewed as a hero of the people, robbing rich landowners to provide food for those who are still under food rationing imposed during World War II. While police try to catch Giuliano, Mafioso lord Don Masino Croce uses his influence to protect the outlaw, who he has long admired, but has never met. When police apprehend Giuliano and his cousin, Aspanu Pisciotta, transporting stolen grain in a coffin, a shootout ensues. Giuliano is shot in the stomach, but kills a policeman. Giuliano and Aspanu take refuge in a monastery near the poor village of Montelepre. A barber, Frisella, tries to remove the bullet, but Giuliano has lost too much blood and a priest gives him last rites. However, when Giuliano survives, he considers it a miracle and believes he is invincible. Meanwhile, Don Masino pays off the family of the dead policeman and the murder charges against Giuliano are dropped. Don Masino hopes the bandit will join forces with him, but Giuliano refuses, despite warnings from a comrade that he will never survive without the blessing of either Don Masino, the Catholic Church, or a rich landowner. The outlaw replies he is a hero of the people and they will protect him. Socialist Silvio Ferra urges the citizens to take advantage of a new law allowing them to buy unused land and farm it. Ferra’s ideas stir unrest among the people, which leaves Don Masino, the government, and the wealthy aristocrats fearful that communists may take control in the upcoming elections. Even though Giuliano agrees with many of the things Silvio advocates, he considers ... +


In late 1940s Sicily, a handsome, rebellious bandit in his mid-twenties named Salvatore Giuliano is viewed as a hero of the people, robbing rich landowners to provide food for those who are still under food rationing imposed during World War II. While police try to catch Giuliano, Mafioso lord Don Masino Croce uses his influence to protect the outlaw, who he has long admired, but has never met. When police apprehend Giuliano and his cousin, Aspanu Pisciotta, transporting stolen grain in a coffin, a shootout ensues. Giuliano is shot in the stomach, but kills a policeman. Giuliano and Aspanu take refuge in a monastery near the poor village of Montelepre. A barber, Frisella, tries to remove the bullet, but Giuliano has lost too much blood and a priest gives him last rites. However, when Giuliano survives, he considers it a miracle and believes he is invincible. Meanwhile, Don Masino pays off the family of the dead policeman and the murder charges against Giuliano are dropped. Don Masino hopes the bandit will join forces with him, but Giuliano refuses, despite warnings from a comrade that he will never survive without the blessing of either Don Masino, the Catholic Church, or a rich landowner. The outlaw replies he is a hero of the people and they will protect him. Socialist Silvio Ferra urges the citizens to take advantage of a new law allowing them to buy unused land and farm it. Ferra’s ideas stir unrest among the people, which leaves Don Masino, the government, and the wealthy aristocrats fearful that communists may take control in the upcoming elections. Even though Giuliano agrees with many of the things Silvio advocates, he considers himself a Christian, not a communist. Giuliano breaks into a prison and releases the prisoners, including outlaws Passatempo and Terranova, who agree to join forces with him. As they leave, a policeman tries to shoot Giuliano at point blank range, but his gun jams and does not fire. Giuliano considers his escaping death a second time to be another miracle. Giuliano’s men set off bombs and steal the money from a train as it passes through a mountain tunnel, but also kill many soldiers on board. Giuliano gives the money to his fiancée, Giovanna Ferra, the sister of Silvio Ferra, telling her to give it to the peasants so they can buy food and land. As Giuliano’s reputation as a modern day Robin Hood grows, the foreign press take notice, including the prestigious American magazine, Life, which features his story on the cover. Giovanna suggests he run for president of Sicily, but Giuliano dismisses the idea, saying he may be a hero to the people, but he has killed too many men. As the American-born Camilla, the Duchess of Crotone, hosts a luncheon for wealthy aristocrats, Giuliano and his men break into her villa and rob the guests of their jewels and watches. Giuliano fascinates Camilla and when he demands her jewels, she takes him to her bedroom suite where they have sex. He tells Camilla that he wants Sicily to secede from Italy and join America as a state. Later, Don Masino arranges for university professor Hector Adonis to persuade his godson, Giuliano, to return Camilla’s jewels. Professor Adonis reports back that Giuliano, who is being called the “Lord of the Mountains,” still refuses to meet with him, but is happy to accept Don Masino’s paternal affection. As Giuliano’s power grows, he gets bolder and goes into Palermo, the capital of Sicily, to take Giovanna dancing at a nightclub, and even gets on stage to announce their upcoming wedding. At church, the two take communion from Father Doldana, who is an assassin posing as a priest. After failing in the assassination attempt, Giuliano has Doldana killed by nailing him to a cross. When Giuliano believes Frisella, the barber, betrayed him, he slays him with a machine gun in the town’s piazza, warning others never to cross him. Afterward, Giuliano personally returns the barber’s shoes and gold watch to his family. The government places a ten million lire bounty on his head. Giuliano kidnaps wealthy landowner Prince Borsa, demanding a one-hundred million lire ransom. While the other mafia bosses on the island want Giuliano dead, Don Masino insists that he will handle the outlaw, revealing that he has several spies in his camp. Meanwhile, Giuliano’s power continues expanding and police in Montelepre stop patrolling the streets at midnight so the outlaw’s men can return from the mountains to visit their families. After receiving the ransom, Giuliano returns Prince Borsa, and finally agrees to meet with Don Masino. The Mafiosi reports that the Italian Minister of Justice, Trezza, has promised a pardon for Giuliano, provided that he convinces the people not to vote for the Communist party. As a wedding present, Don Masino gives Giuliano a copy of the military’s plans to capture him. As Giuliano and Giovanna are married in the mountains, a large procession of people arrive carrying red banners. Giuliano instructs his men to fire their machine guns over the crowd to honor them, but one man fires into the crowd, massacring many people. Giuliano’s reputation is severely tarnished, but he kills one of his colleagues as vengeance and drops the dead body in the piazza with a note reading, “So die all who betray Giuliano.” Outside the gates to Prince Borsa’s estate, Giovanna, who is pregnant, tells the people there are 100,000 unused acres of land that are theirs for the taking. However, Giuliano arrives and executes four Mafia bosses in front of a large crowd of people. Tired of Giuliano’s antics, Minister Trezza sends troops to capture the outlaw, who goes into hiding in Palermo. As Don Masino leaves a building, Giuliano tries to assassinate him, but his gun jams and does not fire. Giuliano’s cousin and second-in-command, Aspanu, meets with Don Masino, reporting that Giuliano has gone crazy and they must kill him. Don Masino agrees, but says they must not let the people know they are responsible. Aspanu tells Giuliano that a boat will take him to safety in America. As the boat departs, Aspanu shoots and kills Giuliano. They drop his dead body in front of a church, where the army riddles him with bullets and takes credit for the killing. Don Masino arranges for Aspanu to be jailed for a year, then pardoned, but Aspanu develops tuberculosis in prison. Professor Adonis poisons him, then leaves a note on Aspanu’s body reading, “So die all who betray Giuliano.” At Giuliano’s grave, Don Masino wonders why the outlaw did not come to him for help. Professor Adonis reports that Giuliano did not need his help because he invented himself. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.