Losin' It (1983)

R | 100 mins | Comedy | 8 April 1983

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HISTORY


       The 30 Jun 1981 DV announced an upcoming picture by Canadian executive producers Joel Michaels and Garth H. Drabinsky, with the working title, Tijuana, to be filmed in U.S. locations, and released by Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. According to the 26 Aug 1981 Var, principal photography was planned to begin late Sep 1981.
       A casting announcement in the 9 Sep 1981 DV described the character, “Wimp,” as a girl in her early teens, of small stature, with “definite star quality,” and similar in type to actress Kristy McNichol. The character was later re-cast as a male, whose character name was changed to “Wendell.” The 16 Oct 1981 DV included actress Monica Parker among the cast, but her name does not appear in onscreen credits.
       An article in the 30 Nov 1982 HR reported that Manson International had acquired foreign distribution rights to the $5 million production, which was to be released domestically by Embassy Pictures. Manson planned to promote the picture at the American Film Market in Mar 1983, and partner with Embassy on a promotional campaign prior to its summer 1983 domestic release.
       The film premiered under its official title, Losin’ It, 8 Apr 1983 in New York City, according to the 6 Apr 1983 Var, which also stated that principal photography occurred in the U.S. and Mexico.
       Losin’ It opened in New York City and Los Angeles, CA, to mostly negative reviews, earning $437,257 at 180 theaters during its debut weekend, as reported in the Jun 1983 Box. ... More Less


       The 30 Jun 1981 DV announced an upcoming picture by Canadian executive producers Joel Michaels and Garth H. Drabinsky, with the working title, Tijuana, to be filmed in U.S. locations, and released by Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. According to the 26 Aug 1981 Var, principal photography was planned to begin late Sep 1981.
       A casting announcement in the 9 Sep 1981 DV described the character, “Wimp,” as a girl in her early teens, of small stature, with “definite star quality,” and similar in type to actress Kristy McNichol. The character was later re-cast as a male, whose character name was changed to “Wendell.” The 16 Oct 1981 DV included actress Monica Parker among the cast, but her name does not appear in onscreen credits.
       An article in the 30 Nov 1982 HR reported that Manson International had acquired foreign distribution rights to the $5 million production, which was to be released domestically by Embassy Pictures. Manson planned to promote the picture at the American Film Market in Mar 1983, and partner with Embassy on a promotional campaign prior to its summer 1983 domestic release.
       The film premiered under its official title, Losin’ It, 8 Apr 1983 in New York City, according to the 6 Apr 1983 Var, which also stated that principal photography occurred in the U.S. and Mexico.
       Losin’ It opened in New York City and Los Angeles, CA, to mostly negative reviews, earning $437,257 at 180 theaters during its debut weekend, as reported in the Jun 1983 Box.
      Opening credits conclude with the statement: "A long time ago in a high school not so far away...." End credits conclude with the statements: "Soundtrack available on Regency Records"; "Our gratitude to the citizens and community of Calexico, California, with special thanks to Lew Bacon and John Rennison."

              The name of songwriter Bert Kalmar is misspelled in end credits as "Kalmer." More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Jun 1983.
---
Daily Variety
30 Jun 1981.
---
Daily Variety
9 Sep 1981.
---
Daily Variety
16 Oct 1981.
---
Daily Variety
11 Mar 1982.
---
Daily Variety
12 Nov 1982.
---
Daily Variety
7 Dec 1982.
---
Daily Variety
9 Dec 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Nov 1982
p. 1, 29.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Apr 1983
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
8 Apr 1983
p. 4.
New York Times
8 Apr 1983
p. 4.
Variety
1 Jul 1981.
---
Variety
26 Aug 1981.
---
Variety
6 Apr 1983.
---
Variety
13 Apr 1983
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Joel B. Michaels/Garth Drabinsky Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2nd asst cam
Still photog
Key grip
Cam grip
Grip
Gaffer
Best boy
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst props
COSTUMES
Ward supv
Ward supv
MUSIC
Orig mus by
Mus rec by
at Contempo Recording Co.
Period mus consultant
Period mus consultant
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom man
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd eff ed
Asst sd eff ed
Foley
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des by
Title opt by
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Scr supv
Asst to exec prods
Asst to exec prods
Asst to exec prods
Transportation capt
Mechanic
Cam car driver
Honeywagon driver
Driver
Driver
Picture car wrangler
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Welfare worker
Loc casting
Extras casting, loc
Extras casting, Los Angeles
Extras casting, Los Angeles
Caterer
Craft service
Craft service
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
"Losin' It," by J. Alan and T. Shenale, performed by the Jeff Alan Band, courtesy of Lombardo Music Mgt.
"Apache," by Jerry Lordan, performed by Jorgen Ingmann, Jorgen Ingmann appears courtesy of Atlantic Records
"La Bamba," traditional arrangement: Ritchie Valens, performed by Ritchie Valens, courtesy of Rhino Records/Del Fi Records
+
SONGS
"Losin' It," by J. Alan and T. Shenale, performed by the Jeff Alan Band, courtesy of Lombardo Music Mgt.
"Apache," by Jerry Lordan, performed by Jorgen Ingmann, Jorgen Ingmann appears courtesy of Atlantic Records
"La Bamba," traditional arrangement: Ritchie Valens, performed by Ritchie Valens, courtesy of Rhino Records/Del Fi Records
"Billboard March," by John N. Klohr
"Dreamin'," by Barry DeVorzon, Ted Ellis, performed by Johnny Burnette, courtesy of Liberty Records, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Hey! Ba-Ba-Re-Bop," by Curley Hamner, Lionel Hampton
"Hey Little Girl," by Otis Blackwell, Bobby Stevenson, performed by Dee Clark, courtesy of Vee Jay Records
"Hooray For Captain Spaulding," by Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby
"It's All In The Game," by Charles G. Dawes and Carl Sigman
"It's All Right," by Curtis Mayfield, performed by the Impressions, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
"Love Potion #9," by Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller, performed by the Clovers, courtesy of Liberty Records, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Pretty Little Angel Eyes," by Tommy Boyce, Curtis Lee, performed by Curtis Lee, courtesy of Dunes Records, Inc.
"Sentimental Journey," by Les Brown, Ben Homer, Bud Green
"The Stripper," by David Rose
"Summertime Blues," by Eddie Cochran, Jerry Capehart, performed by Eddie Cochran, courtesy of Liberty Records, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Tequila," by Chuck Rio, Performed by the Champs, courtesy of Challenge Records
"Travelin' Man," by Jerry Fuller
"Wasted Days, Wasted Nights," by Freddie Fender, Wayne M. Duncan, performed by Freddie Fender, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
"The Way You Do The Things You Do," by William Robinson, Jr., Robert Rogers, Performed by the Temptations, Courtesy of Motown Records Corp.
"Wild Weekend," by Phillip J. Todaro, Tom H. Shannon, performed by the Rockin' Rebels, courtesy of Imperial Music, Inc.
"Will You Love Me Tomorrow," by Carole King, Gerry Goffin, performed by the Shirelles, courtesy of CBS Special Products and Everest Records
"You've Really Got A Hold On Me," by William Robinson, Jr., performed by Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, courtesy of Motown Record Corp.
"Young Love," by Carole Joyner, Ric Cartey, performed by Tab Hunter, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
"For The First Time," by Mike Tile and John Valby.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Losing It
Tijuana
Release Date:
8 April 1983
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 8 April 1983
Production Date:
began September 1981 in Calexico, CA, and Mexico
Copyright Claimant:
Tiberius Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
5 May 1983
Copyright Number:
PA180574
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
100
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
Canada, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26719
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On a Friday morning in the early 1960s, Southern California high school seniors Dave Cartman, Spider Church, and Woody prepare for their school day, to be followed by a long-awaited trip to Tijuana, Mexico. Upon arriving at school, Perlman, the fourth member of the expedition, suddenly withdraws and leaves his friends $95 short of their required funds. Dave’s entrepreneurial younger brother, Wendell, nicknamed “Wimp,” offers to supply the money, but only if he is allowed to go in Perlman’s place. Dave reluctantly agrees to the proposal, hoping Wendell will not interfere as the older boys tour the city’s nightclubs and brothels. The group faces another obstacle when Spider is given an after-school detention for defending himself against an irate football player. However, Spider is undeterred and escapes the campus to joins his friends. Along the way, the boys stop at a grocery store owned by Larry and Kathy, a married couple involved in a heated argument. The boys use the opportunity to shoplift their supplies, unnoticed by the distracted storekeepers. As they race from the parking lot, Kathy requests a ride and announces her plans to file for a Mexican divorce. As the group enters Tijuana, Kathy disembarks at a law office, and the others continue into town. They stop at an automotive upholstery shop, where Dave orders “tuck and roll” vinyl seats for his 1957 Chevrolet. The sheriff appears and expresses admiration for the car, then apprises Dave of a damaged brake light. When Spider antagonizes the sheriff by offering him a $5 bribe, the lawman warns him that their next meeting will not be as ... +


On a Friday morning in the early 1960s, Southern California high school seniors Dave Cartman, Spider Church, and Woody prepare for their school day, to be followed by a long-awaited trip to Tijuana, Mexico. Upon arriving at school, Perlman, the fourth member of the expedition, suddenly withdraws and leaves his friends $95 short of their required funds. Dave’s entrepreneurial younger brother, Wendell, nicknamed “Wimp,” offers to supply the money, but only if he is allowed to go in Perlman’s place. Dave reluctantly agrees to the proposal, hoping Wendell will not interfere as the older boys tour the city’s nightclubs and brothels. The group faces another obstacle when Spider is given an after-school detention for defending himself against an irate football player. However, Spider is undeterred and escapes the campus to joins his friends. Along the way, the boys stop at a grocery store owned by Larry and Kathy, a married couple involved in a heated argument. The boys use the opportunity to shoplift their supplies, unnoticed by the distracted storekeepers. As they race from the parking lot, Kathy requests a ride and announces her plans to file for a Mexican divorce. As the group enters Tijuana, Kathy disembarks at a law office, and the others continue into town. They stop at an automotive upholstery shop, where Dave orders “tuck and roll” vinyl seats for his 1957 Chevrolet. The sheriff appears and expresses admiration for the car, then apprises Dave of a damaged brake light. When Spider antagonizes the sheriff by offering him a $5 bribe, the lawman warns him that their next meeting will not be as cordial. Dave tells Wendell to stay with the car while the other boys make their way to a nightclub and brothel called “The Tunga Lei,” where each of them pairs with a prostitute. Despite plans to lose his virginity on the trip, Woody is unable to perform with the mature prostitute he has chosen, and she attempts to comfort him by offering motherly advice. Later, as Woody and Spider discuss the incident at the bar, Kathy enters, and Spider greets her with a crude proposition. When she and Woody criticize his behavior, Spider announces that his friend is impotent. Woody leaves in humiliation, followed by Kathy, who offers to keep him company. While Spider broods over his altercation with Woody, Dave wanders onto the street and encounters Wendell, carrying a large bag of fireworks that he plans to sell at a profit. Stimulated by his first sexual encounter, Spider is on a mission to procure an aphrodisiac known as “Spanish fly,” which supposedly induces nymphomania in women. Despite Wendell’s insistence that the substance does not exist, Dave requests it from a pharmacist, who threatens him with a rifle. Meanwhile, Woody and Kathy become acquainted, and she compliments him on his desire for romance instead of having meaningless sex. She wishes her husband could be as sensitive. Their mutual attraction grows, stimulated by tequila, and they make love in a motel room. Elsewhere in town, Dave pays a taxicab driver $12 for six doses of Spanish fly, ignoring Wendell’s insistence that the white tablets are common aspirin. At a bar called “The Blue Fox,” Spider triggers a brawl while defending himself against three irate U.S. Marines. The sheriff interrupts the fight and arrests Spider, ignoring the other perpetrators. Meanwhile, Dave dissolves a tablet in the drink of an attractive young street vendor, hoping for another sexual opportunity. While he waits for the drug to take effect, a local boy named Pablo parks his customized Ford Model A nearby, and Dave initiates a conversation with him, unaware that Pablo is the street vendor’s brother. When Dave reveals his intentions toward the girl, Pablo and his friends force Dave and Wendell into the car, and drive them to an auto salvage yard. As Woody and Kathy leave the motel, they see Spider in the back seat of the sheriff’s car and follow it to the police station. Spider is placed in a holding cell, where a large prisoner challenges him to a fight, then overpowers the boy and knocks him unconscious. Woody and Kathy try to reason with the sheriff, but he demands $3,000 to release Spider. At the salvage yard, Dave is hoisted on a crane while Pablo threatens to remove his genitals with a blowtorch. Unaware that his brother is being subjected to a mere prank, Wendell commandeers Pablo’s car and comes to Dave’s rescue. The Cartman brothers arrive at the upholstery shop, where Spider, Woody, Kathy, and the sheriff are waiting for them. Woody informs Dave of Spider’s arrest, and explains that they were forced to offer the Chevrolet in exchange for their friend’s release. As Dave and the sheriff argue over the exchange, Spider and Woody knock the lawman to the ground and handcuff him. Wendell ignites a load of fireworks in the police car and the group makes its escape. Moments later, Pablo and his companions reclaim the Ford and give chase, until Wendell disables the car by firing a skyrocket into its radiator. The group reaches the border to find a slow-moving line of cars in front of them and the sheriff approaching from behind. Spider misinforms a border guard that the Chevrolet is carrying illegal contraband, and the car is towed to the front of the line, away from the sheriff’s reach. A thorough investigation reveals nothing but the sock in Dave’s underwear, and as Kathy and Woody wait for the car to be reassembled, Larry appears, begging his wife to return. She bids Woody an affectionate farewell and leaves with her husband. As the sun rises, the boys stop at a diner on a coastal highway, where they encounter the same group of Marines, and another brawl ensues. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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