I'm Gonna Git You Sucka (1988)

R | 88 mins | Comedy | 14 December 1988

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HISTORY

       According to a 31 Jan 1989 WSJ article, the original title was Mo Git U Sucka, but David M. Forbes, president of MGM/UA stated the company was concerned the title would not be understood by a broad segment of the audience.
       I’m Gonna Git You Sucka was actor Keenan Ivory Wayans' theatrical feature directorial debut.
       The song "I’m a Fly Guy" is a parody of the theme song from Super Fly (1972 see entry) which was also written by songwriter Curtis Mayfield.
       A 22 Jun 1988 Var news item stated that actors Peter Graves and Susie Sparks were to appear in the film, but neither appears in onscreen credits.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files state that principal photography began 8 Jun 1998 and finished 22 Jul 1988. It was filmed entirely in the Greater Los Angeles, CA, area. Locations included the Ebony Theatre at 4718 West Washington Boulevard, the Catch One Disco at 4067 W Pico Blvd, the Modern Cafe in downtown Los Angeles, Green's Soul Food Restaurant, and the Burbank Studios backlot.
       As reported in WSJ, the film’s budget was less than $3 million. It had grossed $6.1 million by 31 Jan 1988. It was initially released 14 Dec 1988 in only four cities: Detroit, MI; Washington, D.C.; Atlanta, GA; and Chicago, IL. By 28 Dec 1988, a HR news item reported it grossed $653,488 in five days. Due to the film’s box-office success, MGM/UA expanded to 150 more theaters on 13 Jan 1989 and another 150 on 17 ... More Less

       According to a 31 Jan 1989 WSJ article, the original title was Mo Git U Sucka, but David M. Forbes, president of MGM/UA stated the company was concerned the title would not be understood by a broad segment of the audience.
       I’m Gonna Git You Sucka was actor Keenan Ivory Wayans' theatrical feature directorial debut.
       The song "I’m a Fly Guy" is a parody of the theme song from Super Fly (1972 see entry) which was also written by songwriter Curtis Mayfield.
       A 22 Jun 1988 Var news item stated that actors Peter Graves and Susie Sparks were to appear in the film, but neither appears in onscreen credits.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files state that principal photography began 8 Jun 1998 and finished 22 Jul 1988. It was filmed entirely in the Greater Los Angeles, CA, area. Locations included the Ebony Theatre at 4718 West Washington Boulevard, the Catch One Disco at 4067 W Pico Blvd, the Modern Cafe in downtown Los Angeles, Green's Soul Food Restaurant, and the Burbank Studios backlot.
       As reported in WSJ, the film’s budget was less than $3 million. It had grossed $6.1 million by 31 Jan 1988. It was initially released 14 Dec 1988 in only four cities: Detroit, MI; Washington, D.C.; Atlanta, GA; and Chicago, IL. By 28 Dec 1988, a HR news item reported it grossed $653,488 in five days. Due to the film’s box-office success, MGM/UA expanded to 150 more theaters on 13 Jan 1989 and another 150 on 17 Feb 1989.
       A television pilot based on the characters from I’m Gonna Git You Sucka called Hammer and Slammer aired on the ABC (American Broadcasting Company) television network on 15 Dec 1990.
      The following thanks appear in end credits: “Thanks to Carole Little, Nike, Adidas, Touch Apparel.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
28 Dec 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 1989
p. 4, 10.
Los Angeles Times
17 Feb 1989
Calendar, p. 8.
New York Times
13 Jan 1989
p. 6.
Variety
22 Jun 1988.
---
Variety
21 Dec 1988
p. 14.
WSJ
31 Jan 1989.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Special Appearances By: (in alphabetical order)
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXTS
United Artists presents
An Ivory Way Production
In Association with Raymond Katz Enterprises and Peter McCarthy
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Co-prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam op
Addl photog
1st cam asst
Addl cam op
Addl cam op
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Lamp op
Elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Swingman
Still photog
Video assist
Opt negative
Cranes and dollys
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
Artist at large
Art asst
Art asst
Art asst
Art asst
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Addl film ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Asst set dec
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
2d asst prop master
Addl set des
Leadman
Scenic artist
Muralist
Swing
Specialty prop
Carpenter
Carpenter
Sculptor
Set painter
Set painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost des asst
Ward supv
Ward asst
Ward asst
MUSIC
Asst mus ed
Mus consultant
SOUND
Prod mixer
Boom man
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
ADR ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Foley walker
Foley walker
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Ultra-Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Asst spec eff
Titles and opt eff
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
2d makeup artist
Asst makeup artist
Spec eff makeup
Hairstylist
Asst hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod des
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod coord
Asst to Peter McCarthy
Asst to Mr. Wayans & Mr. Craig
Asst to Mr. Katz
Asst to Mr. Gold
Prod controller
Casting asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Honeywagon driver
Medic/Craft services
Travel agent
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Welfare worker
Post prod and re-rec facilities
Extras casting
Prod accounting
Travel arrangements
Payroll service
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stunt man
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"I'm Gonna Git You Sucka," written by Norman Whitfield & William Bryant II, produced by Charles Kent Wilson & Ronnie J. WIlson, performed by The Gap Band
"The Brady Bunch," written by Frank DeVol & Sherwood Schwartz, produced by Ted Andreadis & Eric Barrett, performed by The Kids Next Door
"Magic Man," written by L. Chiate, R. Winters, R. Dewey & J. Georgantones, produced by Jerry Knight & Aaron Zigmon, preformed by Jennifer Holiday, courtesy of Arista Records
+
SONGS
"I'm Gonna Git You Sucka," written by Norman Whitfield & William Bryant II, produced by Charles Kent Wilson & Ronnie J. WIlson, performed by The Gap Band
"The Brady Bunch," written by Frank DeVol & Sherwood Schwartz, produced by Ted Andreadis & Eric Barrett, performed by The Kids Next Door
"Magic Man," written by L. Chiate, R. Winters, R. Dewey & J. Georgantones, produced by Jerry Knight & Aaron Zigmon, preformed by Jennifer Holiday, courtesy of Arista Records
"When The Saints (Go Marchin' In)," (Traditional) produced by Tedd Andreadis & Eric Barrett, performed by Kim Wayans
"You're So Cute," written & produced by Charles Kent WIlson & Ronnie J. Wilson, performed by The Gap Band
"If Ever A Love There Was," written by Pamela Phillips Oland & Todd Cerney, produced by Jerry Knight & Aaron Zigmon, performed by The Four Tops & Aretha Franklin, courtesy of Arista Records
"Dancing Machine," written by Hal Davis, Don Fletcher, W . D. Parks, produced by Hal Davis, performed by The Jackson FIve, courtesy of Motown Record Co.
"Pimp of the Year," written & produced by Ted Andreadis & Eric Barrett, performed by Gary Owens
"Grazin' In The Grass," written by Harry J. Alston, performed by Friends of Distinction
"Theme From Shaft," written, performed & produced by Isaac Hayes, courtesy of Fantasy Records
"He's A Flyguy," written by Curtis Mayfield, produced by Curtis Mayfield & David Kahne, performed by Curtis Mayfield & Fishbone, courtesy of Curtom Records of Atlanta, Inc., Fishbone appears courtesy of CBS Records
"Clean Up Your Act," written by Simon Climie, Dennis Morgan & Paul Gurvitz, produced by Preston Glass, preformed by Jermaine Jackson, courtesy of Arista Records
"I'Mo Git U Sucka," written & performed by KRS-One, for Boogie Down Productions, courtesy of Jive Records
"Kung Fu Fighting," written & performed by Carl Douglas, courtesy of PRT Record
"War," written by Norman Whitfield & Barrett Strong, produced by Norman Whitfield, performed by Edwin Starr, courtesy of Motown Record Co.
"Two Can Play The Game," written by Edwin Birdsong, Glen Gibbs & Brian Bond, produced by Tunde-Re Aleem, Edwin Birdsong & Taharqa Aleem, performed by Too Nice, courtesy of Arista Records
"The Beat Is Military," written by V. Lynch, Jr., produced by Bobby "Bobcat" Ervin, performed by K-9 Posse, courtesy of Arista Records
"Jack of Spades," written & performed by KRS-One for Boogie Down Productions, Courtesy of Jive Records.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Mo Git U Sucka
Release Date:
14 December 1988
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 13 January 1989
Los Angeles opening: 17 February 1989
Production Date:
8 June--22 July 1988
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded in Ultra-Stereo®
Color
DeLuxe®
Duration(in mins):
88
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29436
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

One night in “Any Ghetto, USA,” Lieutenant Baker arrives at a crime scene to find the corpse of “June Bug” Spade, covered in gold chains. Another police officer offers the explanation that the victim died of “OG,” or "over gold." Baker scans the crowd, spots one of crime lord “Mr. Big’s” men watching, and tells the police to wrap it up. After June Bug Spade’s funeral, his mother, “Ma” Bell Spade, and wife, Cheryl Spade, are visited by two thugs, Leonard and Willie, who have come to collect $5,000 June Bug owed Mr. Big. When Ma Bell insists they cannot pay, Leonard grabs Cheryl and orders Willie to beat Ma Bell. However, she knocks them senseless and hurls them down the stairs. Jack Spade, June Bug’s brother, arrives as the two hoods run away. Cheryl Spade explains that June Bug changed after Jack left for the army; selling drugs and getting addicted to wearing gold chains. Ma Bell voices her suspicion that Mr. Big ordered June Bug’s death. As they look through a scrapbook, Jack finds a photograph of Ma Bell with famous crime fighter John Slade. Across town, Leonard and Willie tell Mr. Big that it was Jack who attacked them. Mr. Big informs them that because June Bug worked under them, they are now responsible for his debt. Unless they want to be dead, Mr. Big informs them, they are to grab Cheryl so she can be forced into prostitution to pay June Bug’s debt. The next day, Jack spots a newspaper advertisement for a youth gang competition to be judged by local ... +


One night in “Any Ghetto, USA,” Lieutenant Baker arrives at a crime scene to find the corpse of “June Bug” Spade, covered in gold chains. Another police officer offers the explanation that the victim died of “OG,” or "over gold." Baker scans the crowd, spots one of crime lord “Mr. Big’s” men watching, and tells the police to wrap it up. After June Bug Spade’s funeral, his mother, “Ma” Bell Spade, and wife, Cheryl Spade, are visited by two thugs, Leonard and Willie, who have come to collect $5,000 June Bug owed Mr. Big. When Ma Bell insists they cannot pay, Leonard grabs Cheryl and orders Willie to beat Ma Bell. However, she knocks them senseless and hurls them down the stairs. Jack Spade, June Bug’s brother, arrives as the two hoods run away. Cheryl Spade explains that June Bug changed after Jack left for the army; selling drugs and getting addicted to wearing gold chains. Ma Bell voices her suspicion that Mr. Big ordered June Bug’s death. As they look through a scrapbook, Jack finds a photograph of Ma Bell with famous crime fighter John Slade. Across town, Leonard and Willie tell Mr. Big that it was Jack who attacked them. Mr. Big informs them that because June Bug worked under them, they are now responsible for his debt. Unless they want to be dead, Mr. Big informs them, they are to grab Cheryl so she can be forced into prostitution to pay June Bug’s debt. The next day, Jack spots a newspaper advertisement for a youth gang competition to be judged by local crime-fighting legend, John Slade. Jack arrives to see teenagers competing in stolen television set racing and car stripping contests. After John Slade reminisces about having sex with Ma Bell, he turns down Jack’s request for help taking down Mr. Big, claiming he is retired. That night, Jack goes to the diner where Cheryl works to escort her home. Two of Mr. Big’s men arrive, but before Jack can fight, Ma Bell appears and beats both men unconscious. Back at their apartment, Jack straps on a gun and tells Ma Bell he wants to fight his own battles. He storms out just as John Slade arrives. Ma Bell begs Slade to protect Jack. Slade chases Jack down the street and advises him he is too inexperienced to fight Mr. Big. Jack retorts he was trained for combat just as Willie fires a machine gun at them from a rooftop, killing a bystander. As Jack screams and runs in circles, Slade spots Willie. Using the dead man as a shield, Slade rushes across the street. Jack follows and they climb up two different stairwells to the roof. Leonard and Willie concentrate their fire on John Slade, allowing Jack to jump them from behind. After warning that the he is coming for Mr. Big, John Slade throws the two hoodlums down the fire escape. John then takes Jack to a bar and instructs him on how to be a hero. He explains a hero must drink liquor and have plenty of sex. Cherry, a stunning barfly, walks over and tells Jack if he has “twelve inches” she will have sex with him. Once in Cherry’s apartment, Jack admits he is not as well-endowed as he led her to believe. Cherry confesses she too has a secret, then removes her wig, plastic breasts, foam rubber derriere and prosthetic leg. Jack runs back to the bar, where Slade has purchased weapons. Slade tells Jack it is time to recruit their army. Later, Jack tells his sister-in-law, Cheryl, he joined the army to prove to her he did not need his mother’s protection. Instead of seeing combat, he was made a secretary and was too ashamed to come home. She confesses to marrying June Bug because he reminded her of Jack and they embrace. The next day, Slade approaches two of his crime fighting buddies; Hammer and Slammer, who are now restaurateurs. They agree to aid Slade in bringing down Mr. Big. Slade goes to see Flyguy in prison, as he is about to be released after being framed by Mr. Big. Flyguy gives Slade information on Big’s criminal operations. Later, Slade leads a band of musicians down the street, explaining to Jack that every hero needs a theme song. They meet Hammer and Slammer, who are not impressed with Jack, but after they learn he is a former football player, they agree he can be a “Black Hero.” “Kung Fu Joe,” a black martial artist appears, pulls out a picture of Bruce Lee and screams, “They killed my teacher!” Impressed, Jack asks if Joe studied martial arts with Bruce Lee, but Joe tells him Lee was his acting coach. That night, the heroes attack various brothels, drug houses and jewelry stores owned by Mr. Big. At the diner, Cheryl complains she is getting cramps and has to leave. Wearing neck braces and leg casts, Leonard and Willie grab her as she leaves. However, Cheryl’s menstrual cramps turns her into a monster and she beats Leonard until Willie knocks her unconscious. They take her to Mr. Big, who orders them to take Cheryl to his hideout. He telephones Lieutenant Baker and demands protection from Slade and his men. Later, Kung Fu Joe is pulled over by two policemen. They plant cocaine in his car and try to arrest him, but Kung Fu Joe knocks them to the ground. Thirty more police cruisers arrive. Kung Fu Joe laughs that his mystical martial arts skills make him more than a match for them. So they shoot him. Across town, Willie and another thug fail to gun down Slammer and Hammer in a parking garage. Slammer chases Willie to the roof. There, Willie points out that Slammer has fired over twenty rounds from a gun that only holds six bullets. Nonplussed, Slammer is about to pull the trigger again when Hammer arrives and identifies Willie as Mr. Big’s nephew. Willie tells them the location of Mr. Big’s hideout. While men wait as Slammer straps on twenty guns, he slips on a loose bullet, and hits the ground. All his guns misfire, taking Slammer out of the fight. At a large factory, John Slade rappels off the roof to throw a bomb through a window, but the bomb explodes early. Below, Hammer crashes through a window and knocks himself silly. Jack Spade, who came in through the unlocked door, helps Hammer to his feet as a group of thugs open fire. During the gun battle, Hammer and Slammer are unable to continue the fight, but Ma Bell arrives carrying a shotgun and calls for Jack to follow her. Instead he pushes her into a storage room and locks the door. After killing the bad guys with a grenade, Jack Spade takes a wood sliver in his index finger. Gritting his teeth, he removes the splinter with a needle and bandages the finger. Overcoming the pain, he heroically advances, but runs out of bullets. Thinking fast, he uses a paperclip and elastic band to shoot a thug’s eye out and takes his gun, whereupon, another goon shoots at him. After shooting the goon, Jack rushes in to untie Cheryl. Mr. Big’s thug, Leonard, steps from behind the door, but before he can shoot, Flyguy appears, points his gun at Leonard’s head and tells him to drop his weapon. However, Mr. Big appears and tells Flyguy to drop his gun. Jack voices surprise that such a respected character actor like John Vernon would appear in an exploitation film, but Mr. Big claims a lot of famous people, like Shelley Winters and Angie Dickerson have done “B” movies. He aims at Jack and declares “there ain’t going to be a sequel.” Jon Slade appears, shoots Mr. Big and exclaims, “I got you, sucka.” Later, Slade announces that Hammer and Slammer will recover from their wounds and that he wants to be with Ma Bell forever. A rap band appears and Jack tells Slade that every hero should have a theme song. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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