The Karate Kid Part III (1989)

PG | 111 mins | Comedy-drama | 30 June 1989

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HISTORY

       The Karate Kid Part III is the third film in a series. The Karate Kid (see entry) was released in 1984, followed by The Karate Kid, Part II (see entry) in 1986. A fourth movie, The Next Karate Kid (1996, see entry) had the character, Mr. Miyagi, training a girl, played by Hilary Swank, instead of Ralph Macchio’s character, “Daniel.” A thirteen episode animated television series based on the movies premiered on the National Broadcast Company (NBC) on 9 Sep 1989 and ran through 16 Dec 1989.
       Actors Ralph Macchio and Noriyuki “Pat” Morita reprised their roles from The Karate Kid.
       Producer Jerry Weintraub, director John G. Avildsen and screenwriter Robert Mark Kamen worked on all of the first three “Karate Kid” films.
       The Karate Kid Part III represented the theatrical feature debut of actor Thomas Ian Griffith. Although his character “Terry” was supposed to be a Vietnam veteran, he would have been thirteen when that conflict ended, and is a few months younger than Ralph Macchio, who played eighteen, although he was twenty-seven at the time the film was shot.
       This was also actor Sean Kanan’s theatrical feature debut. He was cast during an open call held in Los Angeles, CA. At the time of filming, he only had a green belt in karate. According to a 17 Jul 1989 People news item, Kanan received abdominal injuries doing a stunt that required he lunge seven feet and land on his stomach. The action took twenty takes, and caused a small abdominal tear, which ... More Less

       The Karate Kid Part III is the third film in a series. The Karate Kid (see entry) was released in 1984, followed by The Karate Kid, Part II (see entry) in 1986. A fourth movie, The Next Karate Kid (1996, see entry) had the character, Mr. Miyagi, training a girl, played by Hilary Swank, instead of Ralph Macchio’s character, “Daniel.” A thirteen episode animated television series based on the movies premiered on the National Broadcast Company (NBC) on 9 Sep 1989 and ran through 16 Dec 1989.
       Actors Ralph Macchio and Noriyuki “Pat” Morita reprised their roles from The Karate Kid.
       Producer Jerry Weintraub, director John G. Avildsen and screenwriter Robert Mark Kamen worked on all of the first three “Karate Kid” films.
       The Karate Kid Part III represented the theatrical feature debut of actor Thomas Ian Griffith. Although his character “Terry” was supposed to be a Vietnam veteran, he would have been thirteen when that conflict ended, and is a few months younger than Ralph Macchio, who played eighteen, although he was twenty-seven at the time the film was shot.
       This was also actor Sean Kanan’s theatrical feature debut. He was cast during an open call held in Los Angeles, CA. At the time of filming, he only had a green belt in karate. According to a 17 Jul 1989 People news item, Kanan received abdominal injuries doing a stunt that required he lunge seven feet and land on his stomach. The action took twenty takes, and caused a small abdominal tear, which was exacerbated by Kanan taking aspirin for the pain. During a shooting break over the Christmas holiday, Kanan collapsed in the lobby of the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas, NV, and was rushed to the hospital. Doctors discovered two quarts of blood in his abdomen and rushed him into surgery. Although he was warned his injury was life threatening, Kanan called director John G. Avildsen and begged him not to recast his role. Avildsen revamped the shooting schedule to allow Kanan to return. Although advised against it, Kanan filmed all of his own karate scenes.
       A 11 Oct 1988 HR news item stated principal photography was to begin on 5 Dec 1988. However, a 10 Jan 1989 HR reported filming began on 19 Dec 1988 in Los Angeles, CA.

      The following statement appears in end credits: “The Karate Kid Family will miss our Dear Friend, Jimmy Crabe,” “Special Thanks from the Producers to: The California Film Commission and Lisa Rawlins, Director, Tiffany & Co., XIV Karats, Don Shanley, Harry Winston Jewelers,” and “The title The Karate Kid has been used with the consent of DC Comics, Inc.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
11 Oct 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jan 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jun 1989
p. 4, 16.
Los Angeles Times
30 Jun 1989
p. 10.
New York Times
30 Jun 1989
p. 17.
People
17 Jul 1989
pp. 51-52.
Variety
5 Jul 1989
p. 18, 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures Presents
A Jerry Weintraub Production
A John G. Avildsen FIlm
A Columbia Pictures Release
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod, Visual eff crew
Assoc prod, Visual eff crew
Assoc prod, Visual eff crew
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Steadicam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Best boy
Best boy
Key grip
Best boy/Grip
Best boy/Grip
Dolly grip
Video asst
Aerial cam
Aerial cam
Cam, Visual eff crew
ART DIRECTORS
Illustrator
Art dir, Visual eff crew
FILM EDITORS
Addl editing
Addl editing
1st asst ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Apprentice film ed
Apprentice film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Set des
Const coord
Const foreman
Const painter
Standby painter
COSTUMES
Men's cost supv
Key costumer
MUSIC
Orch
Mus scoring mixer
Mus supv
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom man
Cable man
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Dial ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR asst
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff
Titles & opt eff by
Spec visual eff by
Dir of visual eff, Visual eff crew
Introvision prod mgr, Visual eff crew
DANCE
Dance choreog
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Key hairstylist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Helicopter pilot
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Post-prod coord
Asst to Jerry Weintraub
Asst to Jerry Weintraub
Asst to Jerry Weintraub
Asst to Jerry Weintraub
Asst to Shel Schrager
Asst to John G. Avildsen
Asst to John G. Avildsen
Prod coord
Prod auditor
Unit pub
Scr supv
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Rapelling adv
Bonsai plant adv
Bonsai plant adv
Extra casting
Prod facilities provided by
Prod coord, Visual eff crew
STAND INS
Martial arts & stunts choreog by
Stunt double
Stunt double
Stunt double
Stunt double
Stunt double
Stunt double
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
“Listen To Your Heart,” written by Tom Kelly & Billy Steinberg, produced by Dennis Lambert, performed by Little River Band, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc
“Summer In The City,” written by John Sebastian, Steve Boone & Mark Sebastian, produced by George Duke for George Duke Enterprises, performed by The Pointer Sisters, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P
“Under Any Moon,” written by Diane Warren, produced by Michael Verdick & Don Powell, performed by Glenn Medeiros & Elizabeth Wolfgramm, Glenn Medeiros appears courtesy of Amherst Records, Inc., A&M Records of Canada Limited/MCA Records, Inc., PolyGram International Music BV, Elizabeth Wolfgramm appears courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
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SONGS
“Listen To Your Heart,” written by Tom Kelly & Billy Steinberg, produced by Dennis Lambert, performed by Little River Band, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc
“Summer In The City,” written by John Sebastian, Steve Boone & Mark Sebastian, produced by George Duke for George Duke Enterprises, performed by The Pointer Sisters, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P
“Under Any Moon,” written by Diane Warren, produced by Michael Verdick & Don Powell, performed by Glenn Medeiros & Elizabeth Wolfgramm, Glenn Medeiros appears courtesy of Amherst Records, Inc., A&M Records of Canada Limited/MCA Records, Inc., PolyGram International Music BV, Elizabeth Wolfgramm appears courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
“The First Impression,” written by Jude Cole, produced by Brooks Arthur, performed by Jude Cole, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
“This Could Take All Night,” written by Diane Warren, produced by Denny Diante & Don Powell, performed by Boys Club, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
“In A Trance,” written by Sverre Wiik & Harald Wiik, produced by David J. Holman, co-produced by Kim Bullard, performed by Money Talks, courtesy of Curb Records/MCA Records, Inc.
“48 Hours,” written by Vinnie Chas, Kari Kane, Kristy Majors, Steve Summers & Mitch Stevens, produced by Howard Benson, performed by PBF, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
“Bed O’Nails,” written by Miklos Factor, performed by Miklos Factor
“I Can't Help Myself,” written by Alan Roy Scott, Richard Hahn & Steve Greenberg, produced by Humberto Gatica for HUM, Inc., associate producer Lenny Silver, performed by Glenn Medeiros, courtesy of Amherst Records, Inc./A&M Records of Canada Limited/MCA Records, Inc./ PolyGram International Music BV
“High Wire,” written by Jeff Silbar & Chuck Wild, produced by Humberto Gatica for HUM, Inc., associate producer Lenny Silver, performed by Glenn Medeiros, courtesy of Amherst Records, Inc./A&M Records of Canada Limited/MCA Records, Inc./PolyGram International Music BV
“Out For The Count,” written by Kip Winger, Reb Beach & Brad Miskell, produced by Beau Hill, performed by Winger, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp.
Pan flute played by Zamfir, courtesy of Phillips Records.
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DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Karate Kid, Part III
The Karate Kid III
The Karate Kid 3
Release Date:
30 June 1989
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 30 June 1989
Production Date:
began 19 December 1988
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
20 July 1989
Copyright Number:
PA418587
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Deluxe®
Duration(in mins):
111
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29815
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

One year after he was humiliated when Mr. Miyagi’s student, Daniel LaRusso, won the All Valley Karate Tournament, John Kreese has lost all his students, and must close his dojo. Kreese visits Terry Silver, a Vietnam War buddy, karate black belt, and millionaire, who illegally dumps nuclear waste, to reveal that he is quitting teaching. Silver refuses to hear it and promises he will get revenge against Mr. Miyagi and Daniel LaRusso. Silver sends Kreese to Tahiti to regain his confidence. Miyagi and Daniel return from a trip to Okinawa to find that the apartment house Miyagi manages is being demolished. Daniel’s mother has left to care for a sick relative, so Miyagi lets Daniel stay at his home while he attends college. Although Miyagi refuses to take Daniel’s college fund to start a Bonsai tree nursery, Daniel rents a shop. Miyagi agrees to open the business if Daniel is his partner. That night, Silver hires Mike Barnes, the “bad boy of karate,” to defeat Daniel at the next All Valley tournament, offering him a fifty percent stake in twenty karate schools he plans to open. The next day, Miyagi takes Daniel to bluffs overlooking the Pacific Ocean to collect pine tree saplings. He explains that few natural Bonsai trees exist. When Miyagi immigrated to the United States he planted one on a nearby cliff called the “Devil’s Cauldron” to let it grow. Daniel announces his intention of fighting in the Valley tournament, but Miyagi refuses to coach him, explaining karate is to defend one’s honor or life, not as a competition to win trophies. Later, ... +


One year after he was humiliated when Mr. Miyagi’s student, Daniel LaRusso, won the All Valley Karate Tournament, John Kreese has lost all his students, and must close his dojo. Kreese visits Terry Silver, a Vietnam War buddy, karate black belt, and millionaire, who illegally dumps nuclear waste, to reveal that he is quitting teaching. Silver refuses to hear it and promises he will get revenge against Mr. Miyagi and Daniel LaRusso. Silver sends Kreese to Tahiti to regain his confidence. Miyagi and Daniel return from a trip to Okinawa to find that the apartment house Miyagi manages is being demolished. Daniel’s mother has left to care for a sick relative, so Miyagi lets Daniel stay at his home while he attends college. Although Miyagi refuses to take Daniel’s college fund to start a Bonsai tree nursery, Daniel rents a shop. Miyagi agrees to open the business if Daniel is his partner. That night, Silver hires Mike Barnes, the “bad boy of karate,” to defeat Daniel at the next All Valley tournament, offering him a fifty percent stake in twenty karate schools he plans to open. The next day, Miyagi takes Daniel to bluffs overlooking the Pacific Ocean to collect pine tree saplings. He explains that few natural Bonsai trees exist. When Miyagi immigrated to the United States he planted one on a nearby cliff called the “Devil’s Cauldron” to let it grow. Daniel announces his intention of fighting in the Valley tournament, but Miyagi refuses to coach him, explaining karate is to defend one’s honor or life, not as a competition to win trophies. Later, Daniel goes to a pottery shop to order containers and meets Jessica Andrews. As they talk, Daniel notices a picture of her rock climbing. Jessica asks Daniel out on a date before he leaves. That night, Terry Silver breaks into Mr. Miyagi’s home and discovers Miyagi received a Congressional Medal of Honor while serving with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, a unit composed of Japanese-Americans who served in World War II. Hearing Daniel and Miyagi drive up, Silver climbs into the chimney. Honoring Miyagi’s wishes, Daniel burns the tournament’s application in the fireplace. Miyagi and Daniel leave, and a slightly singed Terry Silver slides out of the chimney. Daniel meets Jessica for their date, only to find she has a boyfriend she plans to see when she goes home for Thanksgiving. As Daniel gives Jessica a tour of his store, Mike Barnes and one of Silver’s goons come in and warn Daniel if he does not fight in the tournament, there will be serious consequences. The next day, pretending he is a karate teacher sent by the masters of the "Cobra Kai" school in South Korea, Silver apologizes for Kreese’s behavior in last year’s tournament and asserts that Kreese died of a heart attack after losing his school. That night, Daniel and Jessica are eating at the shop when Mike Barnes and two goons kick in the door. Daniel refuses to sign the application, so the goons smash the shelves. Daniel kicks one in the head and Jessica takes another out by hitting him in the stomach with a pot. Barnes kicks Jessica in the chest, then beats Daniel. Miyagi appears and hurls him through a door into the street. The three hoodlums leap into a car and drive off. Later, Daniel and Miyagi return to their home to find all of their trees have been stolen. Fearing they will go bankrupt, Daniel decides to retrieve the Bonsai tree Mr. Miyagi planted at Devil's Cauldron to sell for thousands of dollars. Jessica gives Daniel a crash course in rock climbing and they rappel down the steep cliff and find the tree. As Daniel uproots it, Jessica slips. Daniel grabs her, dropping the tree into the ocean below. They rappel down to the rocks and grab the tree before it can be washed away. They notice their climbing ropes being yanked up by Barnes and his two goons who are on top of the cliff. Barnes calls out that the tide is coming in. Unless Daniel signs the application, Barnes will let them drown. Daniel signs and the goons pull them up. However, as they near the top, Barnes demands Daniel toss him the tree. When he does, Barnes snaps it in half. Daniel rushes the tree to Miyagi who binds its trunk with wire. He explains what happened, then asks Miyagi to train him. But Miyagi again refuses. The next day, Terry Silver drives up as Daniel and Jessica are jogging. After hearing Daniel does not have a coach, he offers to lend him a book on karate. Later, Barnes shows up at Miyagi’s home and attacks Daniel for calling police. Silver appears. Pretending not to know Barnes, he chases him off with karate kicks. He tells Daniel he is re-opening the Cobra Kai dojo and offers to be his trainer. For the next few weeks, Silver teaches Daniel how to injure his opponent with illegal moves. When Daniel balks, Silver uses Daniel’s hatred for Barnes to justify these extreme measures. When Miyagi presses Daniel on why he is pushing himself so hard, Daniel responds that if Miyagi is not going to help him, then he should leave him alone. The night before Jessica is to go to Ohio, Daniel takes her dancing. Silver “accidentally” bumps into Daniel. As they talk, a young punk Silver has paid, accosts Jessica. When the boy gropes her, Daniel punches him in the face, breaking his nose. Silver advises him to run before the police come. Daniel runs home to tell Miyagi about the fight and confesses he feels he is coming apart like Mr. Miyagi’s bonsai tree. Miyagi shows him the tree is budding and advises everything can if it has strong roots. Inspired, Daniel goes to Silver’s dojo to declare he is not going to compete in the tournament. He is shocked when Mike Barnes steps out of Silver’s office. Silver explains that unless Daniel fights, he will destroy him and everyone he loves. As Daniel tries to leave, Kreese jumps out, blocking his path. Barnes beats Daniel, then chases him outside. Barnes is hurled back into the dojo by Mr. Miyagi, who pummels the other two other men. While Miyagi is leaving, Silver screams he still wins as he and Kreese are opening dozens of dojos to teach their brand of karate. Miyagi agrees to become Daniel’s trainer. After weeks of training, Daniel and the Bonsai tree grow stronger. Daniel and Miyagi rappel down the Devil’s Cauldron and replant the tree. Miyagi explains that Daniel, like the tree, must choose how it grows. At the tournament, Daniel is the reigning champion and only has to fight in the final bout. So, he watches Barnes annihilate all his opponents. As Daniel finally steps up to the mat, the announcer asks the crowd to applaud for Silver who has bought the building so the All Valley Karate League can have a permanent home. Silver takes the stage and announces his new chain of karate schools and his partnership with Kreese. He then orders Barnes to beat Daniel bloody, but keep the score down so they will go into overtime where he can humiliate Miyagi’s student. Barnes easily scores, then deliberately loses a point by kicking Daniel in the crotch. For the next three minutes, Daniel takes a bruising with Barnes losing every point he gains. During the slight break before overtime, he begs Miyagi to let him quit. Miyagi tells Daniel that his best quality is still inside him, but he must let it out. Daniel limps to the line. Disregarding everything Silver taught him, he ducks a blow and flips Barnes to the mat for the point and victory. Daniel leaps into Mr. Miyagi’s arms screaming, “We did it!” +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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