Pink Cadillac (1989)

PG-13 | 112 mins | Romance | 26 May 1989

Director:

Buddy Van Horn

Writer:

John Eskow

Producer:

David Valdes

Cinematographer:

Jack N. Green

Editor:

Joel Cox

Production Designer:

Edward C. Carfagno

Production Company:

Malpaso Productions
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HISTORY

Pink Cadillac marked screenwriter John Eskow’s theatrical feature debut.
       According to a 21 Sep 1988 Var news brief, principal photography began on 3 Oct 1988. Production notes in AMPAS Library state that the film was shot entirely in Reno, NV, and Greenville and Sacramento, CA. A 21 May 1989 LAT article stated that even with inclement weather and a ten day industry-wide Teamsters (IATSE) strike, the production came in $600,000 under budget and three days ahead of schedule.
       A 31 May 1989 LAT article reported that the film grossed $4.4 million over its four day opening Memorial Day opening weekend on 1,993 screens.
       The following statements appears in end credits: “Special thanks to: Eldorado Hotel Casino, John Asguaga’s Nugget Hotel/Casino for their invaluable help and cooperation"; "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson footage supplied courtesy of Carson Tonight, Inc."; and, "Post-Nuclear Elvis lounge act conceived and performed by James Carrey," referring to actor Jim ... More Less

Pink Cadillac marked screenwriter John Eskow’s theatrical feature debut.
       According to a 21 Sep 1988 Var news brief, principal photography began on 3 Oct 1988. Production notes in AMPAS Library state that the film was shot entirely in Reno, NV, and Greenville and Sacramento, CA. A 21 May 1989 LAT article stated that even with inclement weather and a ten day industry-wide Teamsters (IATSE) strike, the production came in $600,000 under budget and three days ahead of schedule.
       A 31 May 1989 LAT article reported that the film grossed $4.4 million over its four day opening Memorial Day opening weekend on 1,993 screens.
       The following statements appears in end credits: “Special thanks to: Eldorado Hotel Casino, John Asguaga’s Nugget Hotel/Casino for their invaluable help and cooperation"; "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson footage supplied courtesy of Carson Tonight, Inc."; and, "Post-Nuclear Elvis lounge act conceived and performed by James Carrey," referring to actor Jim Carrey. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
26 May 1989
p. 4, 53.
Los Angeles Times
26 May 1989
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
31 May 1989
Calendar.
New York Times
26 May 1989
p. 11.
Variety
31 May 1989
p. 26.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. Presents
A Malpaso Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Paniflex cam and lenses by
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
2d asst cam
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Leadman
Set dresser
Standby painter
Const foreman
COSTUMES
Men's costume supv
Women's costume supv
Men`s ward
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus consultant
Scoring mixer
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cableman
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Prod accountant
Prod secy
Asst to Mr. Eastwood
Asst to Miss Peters
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
First aid
Unit pub
Los Angeles casting asst
Reno atmosphere casting
Greenville atmosphere casting
Sacramento atmosphere casting
Craft service
"The Tonight Show Starring Johnny CArson" footage
Post-nuclear Elvis lounge act concieved and perfor
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Two Doors Down," performed by Dolly Parton, courtesy of RCA Records, written by Dolly Parton
"Born Under A Bad Sign," performed by Robben Ford, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products, written by Booker T. Jones and William Bell
"Any Way The Wind Blows," performed by Southern Pacific, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., written by John McFee and Andre Pessis
+
SONGS
"Two Doors Down," performed by Dolly Parton, courtesy of RCA Records, written by Dolly Parton
"Born Under A Bad Sign," performed by Robben Ford, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products, written by Booker T. Jones and William Bell
"Any Way The Wind Blows," performed by Southern Pacific, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., written by John McFee and Andre Pessis
"Reno Bound," performed by Southern Pacific, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., written by John McFee and Andre Pessis
"Rollin' Dice," performed by Billy Hill, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., written by Dennis Robbins, John Scott Sherrill and Bob Di Perio
"Beneath The Texas Moon," performed by J. C. Crowley, courtesy of RCA Records, written by J. C. Crowley and Jack Wesley Routh
"Drive All Night," performed by Dion, courtesy of Arista Records, Inc., written by Bryan Adams
"Let It Roll," performed by Little Feat, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products, written by Bill Payne, Paul Barrere and Martin Kibbee
"Card Carryin' Fool," performed by Randy Travis, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., written by Byron Hill and Tim Bays
"There's A Tear In My Beer," performed by Hanks Williams, Jr. and Hank Williams, Sr., courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., and PolyGram Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products, written by Hank Williams, "Never Givin' Up On Love," performed by Michael Martin Murphey, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., written Michael Smotherman
"If It Wasn't For The Heartache," performed by Jill Hollier, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., written by Chris Waters and Kix Brooks
"Have You Ever Been Mellow?," written by John Farrar
"Baby, Let's Play House," written by Arthur Gunter
"Boola, Boola," written by Alan M. Hirsch
"Hawaiian War Chant," written by Ralph Freed, Johnny Noble and Leleiohako
"Blue Suede Shoes," written by Carl Lee Perkins.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 May 1989
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 26 May 1989
Production Date:
began 3 October 1988
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
14 July 1989
Copyright Number:
PA423044
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Paniflex cameras and lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
112
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29630
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

While on assignment, bounty hunter Tommy Nowak impersonates a radio disc jockey and convinces a felon that he has won a date with country singer Dolly Parton. Tommy arrives at the felon’s house driving a stretch limousine and dressed as a chauffer. As the man gets in the car, Tommy serves his warrant. Days later, Tommy dresses as a rodeo clown so he can arrest a cowboy after a bucking bronco throws him. In a small trailer park, Lou Ann McGuinn enters her mobile home to find her husband, Roy McGuinn, drinking with his friends. After burning through the rent money, Roy proclaims they are on “Dream Street,” and produces a suitcase full of counterfeit cash. Lou Ann begs Roy not to risk returning to prison, but he insists he knows what he is doing. Days later, the trailer is raided and Lou Ann is arrested. Refusing to turn Roy in, she is arraigned and given $25,000 bail. Although “Waycross,” one of Roy’s buddies, offers to give Lou Ann the money, she requests a bail bondsman. Upon release, Lou Ann steals Roy’s 1957 pink Cadillac and drives to pick up her baby at her at her sister Dinah’s house in Nevada. The next day, Tommy’s boss, Buddy, hands him Lou Ann’s case file and orders him to retrieve her. Tommy declines the assignment, but changes his mind when Buddy mentions Lou Ann’s husband belongs to the “Birthright,” a white supremacist group, and explains the gang will kill Lou Ann before they will let her testify. On the way to Nevada, Lou Ann puts her top down, only to ... +


While on assignment, bounty hunter Tommy Nowak impersonates a radio disc jockey and convinces a felon that he has won a date with country singer Dolly Parton. Tommy arrives at the felon’s house driving a stretch limousine and dressed as a chauffer. As the man gets in the car, Tommy serves his warrant. Days later, Tommy dresses as a rodeo clown so he can arrest a cowboy after a bucking bronco throws him. In a small trailer park, Lou Ann McGuinn enters her mobile home to find her husband, Roy McGuinn, drinking with his friends. After burning through the rent money, Roy proclaims they are on “Dream Street,” and produces a suitcase full of counterfeit cash. Lou Ann begs Roy not to risk returning to prison, but he insists he knows what he is doing. Days later, the trailer is raided and Lou Ann is arrested. Refusing to turn Roy in, she is arraigned and given $25,000 bail. Although “Waycross,” one of Roy’s buddies, offers to give Lou Ann the money, she requests a bail bondsman. Upon release, Lou Ann steals Roy’s 1957 pink Cadillac and drives to pick up her baby at her at her sister Dinah’s house in Nevada. The next day, Tommy’s boss, Buddy, hands him Lou Ann’s case file and orders him to retrieve her. Tommy declines the assignment, but changes his mind when Buddy mentions Lou Ann’s husband belongs to the “Birthright,” a white supremacist group, and explains the gang will kill Lou Ann before they will let her testify. On the way to Nevada, Lou Ann puts her top down, only to have some of the counterfeit money fly out onto the highway. Upon discovering Lou Ann and the money missing, Roy and Waycross report to Alex, the Birthright leader, at his militia’s compound. As punishment for his carelessness, Roy is stood against a wall, while Alex shoots around him. Alex orders Roy and Waycross to retrieve the money and use their best judgement in how they handle Lou Ann. Lou Ann arrives at Dinah’s, but her sister insists the baby will be in danger if Lou Ann takes her. Dinah suggests she and her husband, Jeff, take the child to their mother’s house while Lou Ann hides out in Reno until things cool down. That night, Tommy spots Lou Ann’s car and finds her playing craps at a casino. He introduces himself. Lou Ann seems willing to be arrested until she asks Tommy to hold her purse. She screams she is being robbed, causing security guards to hold Tommy as she runs out of the casino. However, Tommy flashes his warrant and catches her before she can drive off. Lou Ann admits she has over $200,000 in fake money, but planned to turn it over to the authorities, hoping to make a deal. Declaring it is too late to drive, Tommy retrieves the money and agrees to spend the night in the penthouse room where Lou Ann was staying. When Tommy telephones Buddy, he claims he still has not found Lou Ann. The next morning, Tommy discovers Lou Ann’s phony money is actually real legal tender. He theorizes that the Birthright was passing fake bills and the bag Lou Ann has is the last of the real stuff. Lou Ann begs Tommy to let her return to her sister’s to say good-bye to her daughter. Against his better judgment, Tommy agrees and places another call to Buddy, claiming he still has not found Lou Ann. Buddy gives him another case: Jack Bass, a man who stabbed a blackjack dealer in Reno. Unable to leave Lou Ann, Tommy decides to use her as a distraction. Dressed as a sleazy casino owner, Tommy enlists a casino barker to pretend Jack is the one-millionth customer. Lou Ann is to play “Miss Reno Casino,” and escort Jack inside the casino to collect his prize. However, as Tommy spots Jack, he leaves Lou Ann in the car with the keys in the ignition. As Tommy approaches Jack, Lou Ann drives away. The barker gets nervous and refers to Tommy as a detective, causing Jack to flee. He almost escapes, but Lou Ann reappears and hits him with the car. Jack springs up, hurls Lou Ann out of the car and jumps in. As he drives away, Tommy leaps on the roof and covers Jack’s eyes with his hands, causing Jack to smash into the casino. As Tommy’s car is totaled, Lou Ann offers him the use of the Cadillac. Tommy and Lou Ann arrive at Dinah’s only to find Jeff and Waycross have taken the baby hostage. While Roy steps outside to see if the money is in the car, Tommy pulls his gun, shoots Waycross, and leaps out a window. Roy rushes in, grabs the baby and the wounded, Waycross and throws them into Waycross’s truck. They do not get far before Waycross dies. Tommy promises Lou Ann he will rescue the baby. He finds Roy’s counterfeit driver’s license and declares he knows who made it. They visit forger Ricky Z, who gives Tommy the name of the town where the Birthrights drink. He insists on devising a new identity for Lou Ann. At the Birthright camp, Alex declares the group must avenge Waycross. Roy reports he lost his fake license and Alex realizes Tommy could use it as a clue. He orders his men visit Ricky Z’s and discover Lou Ann’s whereabouts. The men beat Ricky and set fire to his cabin. Ricky escapes by kicking out a back wall. That night, Tommy and Lou Ann arrive at a motel, and after asking the desk clerk to hide their car, they make love. The next morning, they discover the desk clerk hid their car in a chicken coop. They drive to a car wash where members of the Birthright are waiting for them. They give chase, but Tommy forces them off the road. Tommy and Lou Ann return to the motel and force the desk clerk to telephone Alex. Tommy negotiates to trade the money for the baby. Tommy and Lou Ann drop a bag off at the designated spot. Hearing a baby crying, they search a dumpster and find a doll attached to a bomb. Tommy hurls it away before it explodes, and sees Roy and his comrades drive off in the Cadillac. At the camp, Alex is infuriated to find the bag is stuffed with newspapers, and swears revenge on Tommy. Pretending to be a would-be recruit, Tommy goes to the bar the Birthrights frequent, befriends a few of the gang, and arranges to meet Alex at camp in the morning. To Tommy’s annoyance, Lou Ann insists on coming with him. As they approach the camp, they find Roy on guard duty. Roy agrees to help them rescue the baby. Tommy and Lou Ann sneak into the camp, knock out a guard, and find the baby inside an arsenal. Tommy grabs some grenades. The guard comes to and screams an alarm. During the ensuing gun battle, Tommy holds the gang off as Lou Ann rushes the baby to safety. However, she is caught and Alex orders Tommy to drop his weapon. Lou Ann, still carrying the baby, joins Tommy and slips him another pistol. Grabbing Alex as a hostage, Tommy and Lou Ann jump back into the Cadillac. As they hurtle down a mountain road, Tommy hurls grenades at his pursuers. Two men get Tommy in their sights, but Roy knocks them over. After Tommy and Lou Ann escape, he suggests they visit the District Attorney and explain everything, claiming that if the DA wants to prosecute, Lou Anne can skip bail. The baby looks up at Tommy and calls him “Dada.” +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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