Basket Case 2 (1990)

R | 90 mins | Horror | 2 March 1990

Director:

Frank Henenlotter

Producer:

Edgar Ievins

Cinematographer:

Robert M. Baldwin

Editor:

Kevin Tent

Production Designer:

Michael P. Moran

Production Company:

Full Moon Productions
Full page view
HISTORY

       Basket Case 2 was a sequel to Basket Case (1982), which introduced the character of "Duane Bradley," portrayed by Kevin VanHentenryck. The spelling of the actor’s surname was changed to Van Hentenryck in a second sequel, Basket Case 3: The Progeny (1992, see entry). Also, the character was listed as “Duane Bradley” in credits for the first and third films, but only as “Duane” in Basket Case 2.
       Though actor Jan Saint’s character is listed in the credits as “Lyle Barker,” the "Granny Ruth" character calls him “Howard Barker.” Credits misspell the opera number, “Dai Campi, Dai Prati,” as “Dai Campi, Dai Prapi.”
       Principal photography began 28 Aug 1989 in New York City, according to the 13 Sep 1989 Var.
       The 6 Mar 1990 HR noted that actor Jason Evers’s character, “Lou the editor,” had a framed front page of his tabloid, Judge and Jury, on the wall, with the headline: “Woman’s Severed Head Lives,” illustrated by a photograph from the film The Brain That Wouldn’t Die (1962, see entry). It was an inside joke for viewers who knew that Evers starred in the earlier film as a man who kept alive the head of his decapitated fiancée.
       The 21 Feb 1990 DV reported that the Los Angeles, CA, opening of Basket Case 2, along with sneak previews and press screenings scheduled later that month, had been “postponed indefinitely.” The film eventually opened in Los Angeles on 13 Apr 1990, more than a month after its New York opening.
      End credits contain the following information: “Thanks to: ... More Less

       Basket Case 2 was a sequel to Basket Case (1982), which introduced the character of "Duane Bradley," portrayed by Kevin VanHentenryck. The spelling of the actor’s surname was changed to Van Hentenryck in a second sequel, Basket Case 3: The Progeny (1992, see entry). Also, the character was listed as “Duane Bradley” in credits for the first and third films, but only as “Duane” in Basket Case 2.
       Though actor Jan Saint’s character is listed in the credits as “Lyle Barker,” the "Granny Ruth" character calls him “Howard Barker.” Credits misspell the opera number, “Dai Campi, Dai Prati,” as “Dai Campi, Dai Prapi.”
       Principal photography began 28 Aug 1989 in New York City, according to the 13 Sep 1989 Var.
       The 6 Mar 1990 HR noted that actor Jason Evers’s character, “Lou the editor,” had a framed front page of his tabloid, Judge and Jury, on the wall, with the headline: “Woman’s Severed Head Lives,” illustrated by a photograph from the film The Brain That Wouldn’t Die (1962, see entry). It was an inside joke for viewers who knew that Evers starred in the earlier film as a man who kept alive the head of his decapitated fiancée.
       The 21 Feb 1990 DV reported that the Los Angeles, CA, opening of Basket Case 2, along with sneak previews and press screenings scheduled later that month, had been “postponed indefinitely.” The film eventually opened in Los Angeles on 13 Apr 1990, more than a month after its New York opening.
      End credits contain the following information: “Thanks to: All Brand Importers; B & H Photo & Electronics Corp.; Consolidated Beverage; Falstaff & Narragansett Brewing Co.; Frito Lay; Hudson River Foundation; The Jolt Company; Linden Bay Care Center; M & M Superette; Metro Bicycle Stores; Monday Afternoon Club; Pepsi Co.; Solerno Pontiac; Jorge Amador; Dr. Barylick; Roger Grod; David Klindon; Jeremy Koch; Martha Pike; Dan Sandberg; Dr. Steve Smoller; [and] Sherry Sontag.” Also, “Special thanks to: City of New York Mayor’s Office for Film & Television; City of New York Tactical Police Force; [and] New Jersey State Film Commission.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
21 Feb 1990.
---
Daily Variety
1 Mar 1990
p. 2, 18.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Mar 1990
p. 4, 73.
Los Angeles Times
13 Apr 1990
p. 6.
New York Times
2 Mar 1990
p. 6.
Theatre Crafts
Apr 1990.
---
Variety
13 Sep 1989
p. 17.
Variety
7 Mar 1990
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Shapiro Glickenhaus Entertainment Presents
An Ievins/Henenlotter Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Addl 1st asst
Addl 1st asst
Video tech
Gaffer
Best boy
3rd elec
Addl elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Best boy grip
Addl grip
Addl grip
Addl grip
Addl grip
Addl grip
Swing
Addl cam equip
Addl cam equip
Motion control cam
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dept coord
Pop surrealist
Graphic art asst
Title art
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutters
Dailies supv
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Const coord
Master scenic carpenter
Key set dresser
Prop master
Lead carpenter
Scenic carpenter
Scenic carpenter
Scenic carpenter
Scenic carpenter
Scenic carpenter
Scenic carpenter
Scenic artist
COSTUMES
Ward supv
Asst ward supv
Spec eff ward, Spec make up eff crew
MUSIC
Asst to comp
Studio supv
Studio mgr
Asst studio mgr
Studio PA
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Re-rec eng
Sd mixer
Boom op
Addl boom op
Prod sd equip
Post prod audio services
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Animatronics supv
Spec eff mechanic
Spec eff mechanic
Spec eff mechanic
Titles & opt eff
Opt supv
Opt layout
Opt printer
16mm opt enlargement
MAKEUP
Spec make up eff
Make up artist
Make up artist
Hair stylist
1st asst, Spec make up eff crew
Spec eff asst, Spec make up eff crew
Spec eff asst, Spec make up eff crew
Spec eff asst, Spec make up eff crew
Spec eff asst, Spec make up eff crew
Spec eff asst, Spec make up eff crew
Spec eff asst, Spec make up eff crew
Spec eff asst, Spec make up eff crew
Belial originally des by, Spec make up eff crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec in charge of prod
Asst prod exec
Asst prod exec
Scr supv
Prod office coord
Prod auditor
Asst office coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Asst auditor
Addl casting
Computer consultant
Office asst
Office asst
Prod driver
Prod driver
Loc scout
Loc scout
Loc asst
Loc intern
Craft services
Craft services, Anita's Kitchen
Craft services, Anita's Kitchen
Craft services, Anita's Kitchen
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Loc equip
Prod insurance
Payroll services
Post prod lab supv
STAND INS
Stunt Phil
Stunt Susan
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
ANIMATION
Animation cam
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Dai Campi, Dai Prapi," from Mefistofele, by A. Boito, performed by Charles Rudolph.
PERFORMER
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 March 1990
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 2 March 1990
Los Angeles opening: 13 April 1990
Production Date:
began 28 August 1989
Copyright Claimant:
1989 SGE Entertainment Corporation
Copyright Date:
12 July 1990
Copyright Number:
PA477439
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
90
Length(in feet):
8,083
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Duane Bradley falls through the third floor window of a Times Square hotel in New York City and is held by his brother, Belial, a creature with little more than a head and two powerful arms. However, both drop to the pavement below. When the brothers’ bizarre story makes television news, “Granny” Ruth Smoller, a psychiatrist, and her granddaughter, Susan, watch the coverage. Reporters and officials explain that Duane and Belial were Siamese twins, and Belial was originally thought to have died during surgery to separate them. Seeing the name of the hospital where the brothers were taken, Granny Ruth and Susan leave to rescue them. Meanwhile, Duane rises from bed, pulls intravenous tubes out of his arm, and finds Belial behind a curtain. When a security guard walks in, Belial strangles him. Duane hides Belial in a laundry cart and escapes. Granny Ruth and Susan arrive in a van, introduce themselves to Duane as friends of his aunt, and drive him and Belial to Granny Ruth’s mansion on Staten Island, New York. Later, Duane has dreams of distorted creatures. When he wakes up, he guesses the images came telepathically from Belial. Granny Ruth goes to a nursery where Belial is hiding and assures him that others just like him are sheltered elsewhere in the house, safe from the outside world, but he will have to live by her rules. Placing Belial in a new wicker basket, she takes him to meet the others in the attic. Among her “children” are Lorenzo with an oversized head and tiny body who sings opera, Frederick the Pinhead, and a tiny girl named Eve who, like Belial, is missing most of her ... +


Duane Bradley falls through the third floor window of a Times Square hotel in New York City and is held by his brother, Belial, a creature with little more than a head and two powerful arms. However, both drop to the pavement below. When the brothers’ bizarre story makes television news, “Granny” Ruth Smoller, a psychiatrist, and her granddaughter, Susan, watch the coverage. Reporters and officials explain that Duane and Belial were Siamese twins, and Belial was originally thought to have died during surgery to separate them. Seeing the name of the hospital where the brothers were taken, Granny Ruth and Susan leave to rescue them. Meanwhile, Duane rises from bed, pulls intravenous tubes out of his arm, and finds Belial behind a curtain. When a security guard walks in, Belial strangles him. Duane hides Belial in a laundry cart and escapes. Granny Ruth and Susan arrive in a van, introduce themselves to Duane as friends of his aunt, and drive him and Belial to Granny Ruth’s mansion on Staten Island, New York. Later, Duane has dreams of distorted creatures. When he wakes up, he guesses the images came telepathically from Belial. Granny Ruth goes to a nursery where Belial is hiding and assures him that others just like him are sheltered elsewhere in the house, safe from the outside world, but he will have to live by her rules. Placing Belial in a new wicker basket, she takes him to meet the others in the attic. Among her “children” are Lorenzo with an oversized head and tiny body who sings opera, Frederick the Pinhead, and a tiny girl named Eve who, like Belial, is missing most of her body. Meanwhile, Lou, the editor of a tabloid newspaper, Judge and Jury, gives ambitious reporter Marcie Elliot an assignment to write a series of stories on the “Times Square Freak Twins.” Lou suggests that she talk to Phil, her police detective boyfriend, who once dealt with “Dr. Freak,” a crazy woman who gave birth to a boy with eleven arms, became a “missionary for freaks’ rights,” and founded a “freak commune” after her baby died. Her real name, he says, is Ruth Smoller, and she might still be alive. First, Marcie telephones Howard Barker, a “Mysteries of Nature” sideshow owner near New York City who has begun advertising the “Bradley monster.” Marcie agrees to pay him $100 for an interview. The moment Barker hangs up, Granny Ruth knocks and wants to see the Bradley monster. Shown a creature fabricated from wire, chicken bones, and papier-mâché, she accuses him of exploiting freaks of nature, then brings in the wicker basket. Belial leaps out and attacks Barker. When Marcie arrives later, she finds Barker’s body with his face torn off. Back at the Judge and Jury office, staff photographer Arty wants to get in on the story. Meanwhile, Clancy, the owner of Clancy’s Bar on Staten Island, accosts Susan outside a grocery store, makes sexual advances, and asks if her grandmother still looks after freaks. At the house, Granny Ruth tries to cajole Belial into talking about his feelings. Though she understands his separation anxiety, she advises Belial that ripping peoples’ faces off may not endear him to others. Duane, meanwhile, expresses his warm feelings toward Susan. Since Belial is happy at the mansion, Duane wants to leave, take Susan with him, and start a new life, but she insists that she and Duane belong there. In his room, Duane remembers how his father demanded an operation to separate him from “that other thing.” He studies the large scar on his torso in a mirror and recalls being dragged screaming into a room where Dr. Kutler surgically removed Belial. Duane goes to the attic, finds Belial holding hands with Eve, and carries him outside in the basket. When Duane asks for his brother’s permission to leave with Susan. Belial telepathically laughs at him for thinking he is normal. Arty and Marcie drive to Ruth’s home. Arty stays in the car while Marcie goes inside. Granny Ruth declares that she despises everything Marcie stands for, because tabloids destroyed her work with “unique individuals,” and now she has only a few elderly female patients. When Duane enters with Belial’s basket, Granny Ruth introduces him as a grocery delivery boy, but Marcie hurries back to the car to tell Arty she recognized Duane and exclaims that the story is big enough to ensure them a seven-figure hardcover book deal. Inside, Granny Ruth is certain Marcie recognized Duane, and if so, he will have to stay and defend the others. That night, as Granny Ruth tells the freaks they are under attack and must “invite” their enemies inside for a “warm welcome,” Marcie and Arty return. After they watch Granny Ruth and Susan drive away, Arty sneaks inside and climbs into the attic, where the freaks kill him. Seeing light flashes from Arty’s camera, Marcie approaches the house, but suddenly all the lights go out, room by room. She rushes to her police detective friend, Phil, and tells him that Arty has been killed. Phil telephones Susan, orders her to put Duane on the phone, and tells Duane to meet him, or else. Phil goes to Clancy’s Bar and offers to help Duane escape and join the normal world, but Duane claims he is normal only because he looks normal. In a house of freaks, he and Phil would be the freaks, he says. When Duane suggests they poll the dark tavern’s clientele to see who is normal, the other customers remove their masks, revealing themselves as Granny Ruth’s freaks. Phil pulls his gun and backs out, but tumbles over Belial’s basket and is killed. As the freaks get into Granny Ruth’s van, Belial gives her a paper from Phil’s pocket that reveals Marcie’s home address in Flushing, New York. Later, when Duane and Belial show up at her apartment to grant a “personal interview,” the entire place fills with the creatures. Marcie grabs a knife, but Belial rips her face off, and Duane tells her that she is a freak now, as well. Later, while Granny Ruth’s denizens dine together on the patio, Susan finds Duane in his room. Sensing Belial’s love for Eve as the two freaks make love in another room, Duane wants Susan to be his girl friend. She reveals that she has been pregnant for the past six years. Suddenly, a crocodile-like creature comes out of her stomach to reveal itself, then returns inside. Disgusted, Duane pushes Susan out a window, and she crashes onto the freaks’ dinner table below. Angry that Belial has found happiness, Duane stuns his twin with a baseball bat and sews him back onto his body. As the freaks break into the room, Duane announces that he and Belial are together again.

+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.