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HISTORY

       The 9 Mar 1984 DV production chart announced that principal photography was set to begin on 14 May 1984 in New York. However, the 16 May 1984 Var reported filming would begin on 29 May 1984 for fourteen weeks, shooting at Kaufman Astoria Studios in Long Island, NY. Production was delayed again, according to the 18 May 1984 DV, and would finally get underway on 2 Jun 1984.
       The 13 Jun 1984 Var noted a $15 million budget, and stated that director Bob Clark was responsible for writing the final script, although he did not receive onscreen writing credit. Bob Clark responded to this statement in the 11 Jul 1984 Var and stated that although he contributed to the final draft, the screenwriting credit given to John and Denis Hamill was “justly and richly deserved.”
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, producers Ted Field and Peter Samuelson of Interscope Communications optioned James Gregory Kingston’s screenplay for Turk 182! in 1980. After working on several revisions with Kingston, screenwriters John and Denis Hamill were hired, vastly changing the story, and producing ten drafts of the screenplay before the final script was finished. Production notes report the film was repeatedly turned down by “every major studio and mini-major in town.” Cast and crew worked for two weeks to complete the night sequences filmed atop the Queensboro Bridge. Filmmakers created twenty-foot-high letters spelling “Queensboro 1909-1984,” that were attached to the top of the bridge girders for the climactic moments of the film.
       The 7 Feb 1985 ... More Less

       The 9 Mar 1984 DV production chart announced that principal photography was set to begin on 14 May 1984 in New York. However, the 16 May 1984 Var reported filming would begin on 29 May 1984 for fourteen weeks, shooting at Kaufman Astoria Studios in Long Island, NY. Production was delayed again, according to the 18 May 1984 DV, and would finally get underway on 2 Jun 1984.
       The 13 Jun 1984 Var noted a $15 million budget, and stated that director Bob Clark was responsible for writing the final script, although he did not receive onscreen writing credit. Bob Clark responded to this statement in the 11 Jul 1984 Var and stated that although he contributed to the final draft, the screenwriting credit given to John and Denis Hamill was “justly and richly deserved.”
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, producers Ted Field and Peter Samuelson of Interscope Communications optioned James Gregory Kingston’s screenplay for Turk 182! in 1980. After working on several revisions with Kingston, screenwriters John and Denis Hamill were hired, vastly changing the story, and producing ten drafts of the screenplay before the final script was finished. Production notes report the film was repeatedly turned down by “every major studio and mini-major in town.” Cast and crew worked for two weeks to complete the night sequences filmed atop the Queensboro Bridge. Filmmakers created twenty-foot-high letters spelling “Queensboro 1909-1984,” that were attached to the top of the bridge girders for the climactic moments of the film.
       The 7 Feb 1985 HR announced a benefit premiere would be held on 11 Feb 1985 at the AMPAS Samuel Goldwyn Theater, with proceeds going toward the Juvenile Diabetes and Starlight Foundations.
       Turk 182! earned $1.6 million in box-office receipts during its first four days on 792 screens, according to the Apr 1985 Box.
      End credits include the following acknowledgments: “Filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios in New York”; and, “Special Thanks to Patricia Scott, of the New York City Mayor’s Film Office and Denis Wendling, NYC Transit Authority and to the Athletic Dept. of Kent State University, Kent, Ohio and the New York City Fire Department.”
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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Apr 1985.
---
Daily Variety
9 Mar 1984.
---
Daily Variety
18 May 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 1985
p. 3, 13.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Feb 1985.
---
Los Angeles Times
19 Feb 1985
p. 5.
New York Times
15 Feb 1985
p. 14.
Variety
16 May 1984.
---
Variety
13 Jun 1984
p. 4, 33.
Variety
11 Jul 1984.
---
Variety
6 Feb 1985
p. 18.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Thomas Quinn
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
An Interscope Communications production
A Bob Clark film
Produced and Released by Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam asst
Key grip
Gaffer
2d cam asst
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Post prod supv
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Const coord
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's costumer
Women's costumer
MUSIC
Mus
Mus ed
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd ed
Sd ed
Boom op
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Video eff by
Titles by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting, Los Angeles
Casting, Los Angeles
Casting, New York
Scr supv
Asst to Bob Clark
Extras casting
Extras casting
Unit pub
Transportation capt
Auditor
Asst auditor
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to prod
Asst to Timothy Hutton
Helicopter pilot
Helicopter pilot
Fire seq tech adv
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
ANIMATION
Computer anim prod at
Computer anim prod by
Computer anim prod by
Stadium matrix board anim by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Turk 182
Release Date:
15 February 1985
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 15 February 1985
Production Date:
2 June--early September 1984
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
8 March 1985
Copyright Number:
PA241512
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo® in selected theaters
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Prints
Prints by DeLuxe
Duration(in mins):
96
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27426
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, off-duty firefighter, Terry Lynch, drinks at a bar with his brother, Jimmy. When a young neighborhood boy runs inside exclaiming there is a fire in his building, Terry rushes to rescue the boy’s little sister. Firemen arrive on the scene, and the spray from their powerful hose knocks Terry through a window and he falls several stories to the ground with the little girl in his arms. Six-months later, Terry is still recovering in the hospital, and Jimmy Lynch worries that his brother continues to suffer nightmares from the ordeal. The city refuses to pay Terry’s pension and medical bills claiming his injuries were the result of being intoxicated. Jimmy goes to the Mayor’s office to fight for his brother. Finding Mayor Tyler being hounded by reporters, Jimmy uses the opportunity to approach him. However, hearing that Terry Lynch had been drinking during the incident, the Mayor is unsympathetic. In defiance, Jimmy covers the walls of the Mayor’s office with letters of support for Terry. Detective Ryan, the Mayor’s right-hand man, is ordered to find the culprit. Sometime later, Terry tells Jimmy that he thinks about killing himself. Detective Ryan arrests Terry for posting the letters in the Mayor’s office. When Jimmy goes to the station to post bail for his brother, he meets Danny Boudreau, a social services intern assigned to Terry’s case. Jimmy is rude to the young woman because he distrusts social workers, having encountered several throughout his life after his parents died and he was left in his brother’s care. Jimmy is alerted that Terry attempted suicide ... +


In New York City, off-duty firefighter, Terry Lynch, drinks at a bar with his brother, Jimmy. When a young neighborhood boy runs inside exclaiming there is a fire in his building, Terry rushes to rescue the boy’s little sister. Firemen arrive on the scene, and the spray from their powerful hose knocks Terry through a window and he falls several stories to the ground with the little girl in his arms. Six-months later, Terry is still recovering in the hospital, and Jimmy Lynch worries that his brother continues to suffer nightmares from the ordeal. The city refuses to pay Terry’s pension and medical bills claiming his injuries were the result of being intoxicated. Jimmy goes to the Mayor’s office to fight for his brother. Finding Mayor Tyler being hounded by reporters, Jimmy uses the opportunity to approach him. However, hearing that Terry Lynch had been drinking during the incident, the Mayor is unsympathetic. In defiance, Jimmy covers the walls of the Mayor’s office with letters of support for Terry. Detective Ryan, the Mayor’s right-hand man, is ordered to find the culprit. Sometime later, Terry tells Jimmy that he thinks about killing himself. Detective Ryan arrests Terry for posting the letters in the Mayor’s office. When Jimmy goes to the station to post bail for his brother, he meets Danny Boudreau, a social services intern assigned to Terry’s case. Jimmy is rude to the young woman because he distrusts social workers, having encountered several throughout his life after his parents died and he was left in his brother’s care. Jimmy is alerted that Terry attempted suicide and was hospitalized. He rushes to confront the Mayor again at a public event. After being ignored for the second time, he plots revenge. Danny tells Jimmy that if he confesses to the Mayor’s office prank, the charges against his brother will be dropped, and Jimmy finally realizes that Danny is an ally. At a ceremony to “Polish the Apple” and clean up the city, Jimmy embarrasses the Mayor by covering a subway car with graffiti. He signs it, “Turk 182!” his brother’s nickname and firehouse number, and gets talked about on the news. Jimmy continues leaving “Turk 182!” messages around the city and becomes a legend. Detective Kowalski makes catching the mystery vandal his number one priority. In time, Jimmy asks his friend, “Jockamo,” for help with a large-scale prank, and takes Danny on a date to a football game, where Mayor Tyler is in attendance. With Jockamo’s help, Jimmy rigs the scoreboard to flash “Turk 182!” and the stadium goes wild. Danny cheers along with the crowd, unaware that Jimmy is responsible for the stunt. Back at Jimmy’s house, Danny sees a trophy with Terry’s nickname “Turk” etched on it, and realizes Jimmy is behind the pranks. She has sex with Jimmy and tells him he could be elected Mayor with his newfound popularity. Jimmy insists she keep his secret. Danny and Jimmy visit Terry in the hospital, and Terry hints he still plans to kill himself. Detectives begin to suspect Jimmy of the vandalism, and they question Terry. Terry is defiant, and with no evidence, the detectives leave. Danny convinces Jimmy to reveal his identity and tell his story to a reporter. However, when Jimmy sees the news broadcast about his story, he is upset that his interview was not included in the report, and that the details of his motivations were incorrect. He sets off to create a final act of rebellion. During the lighting of a sign on the Queensboro Bridge attended by the Mayor, Jimmy climbs to the top of the bridge and slowly rigs the lights to spell “Turk 182!” News quickly spreads, and Jimmy’s interview is finally played on television. Terry and Danny watch as Jimmy tells Terry’s story, fighting for the pension he deserves. Escorted by Detective Kowalski, who offers his support, Terry goes to lure Jimmy down from the bridge. Mayor Tyler’s right-hand man, Detective Ryan, is angered when he is unable to stop Jimmy, and rides a cherry picker to the top of the bridge shooting at Jimmy who dangles from a rope. The crowd is stunned when Ryan defies orders from Detective Kowalski and continues shooting at Jimmy, and they cheer whenever he misses. Jimmy finally spells out “Turk 182!” and even the Mayor cheers. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.