Twice in a Lifetime (1985)

R | 117 mins | Drama | 23 October 1985

Director:

Bud Yorkin

Writer:

Colin Welland

Producer:

Bud Yorkin

Cinematographer:

Nick McLean

Editor:

Robert C. Jones

Production Designer:

William J. Creber

Production Company:

Yorkin Company
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HISTORY

Referring to the film as Kisses At 50, the 1 Mar 1984 DV announced that Bud Yorkin would be producing and directing the forthcoming picture for ITC Productions. However, the 5 Jun 1984 DV reported that the $8 million budget would be financed independently by Bud Yorkin.
       According to the 13 Jul 1984 DV production chart, principal photography was set to begin on 19 Jul 1984 in Seattle, WA. However, production notes in AMPAS library files report that production began on 15 Jul 1984 and was completed on 13 Sep 1984. Locations included downtown Seattle and the suburbs of Ballard and Snohomish, WA, where filmmakers were granted permission to shoot at Jorgensen Steel and Chuckanut Charlie’s bar, which stood in for “The Shamrock” bar onscreen.
       The 15 Sep 1985 LAT reported that actress Ellen Burstyn actually got her ears pierced on camera for the role of “Kate.” The scene showcasing “Kate’s” independence was Burstyn’s idea.
       Colin Welland’s story was previously filmed as an hour-long British television show, as noted in the 27 Jul 1984 DV. When the theatrical project went into turnaround at the Ladd Company, Bud Yorkin purchased film rights. After a script rewrite, Yorkin secured the $8 million production budget from private investors. DV announced plans for the filmmakers to release the picture in late 1984 in order to be eligible for Oscar consideration.
       According to the 16 Aug 1984 DV, ITC Entertainment was suing Bud Yorkin. The project originally belonged to Ladd Companypany, where Yorkin reportedly offered his services ... More Less

Referring to the film as Kisses At 50, the 1 Mar 1984 DV announced that Bud Yorkin would be producing and directing the forthcoming picture for ITC Productions. However, the 5 Jun 1984 DV reported that the $8 million budget would be financed independently by Bud Yorkin.
       According to the 13 Jul 1984 DV production chart, principal photography was set to begin on 19 Jul 1984 in Seattle, WA. However, production notes in AMPAS library files report that production began on 15 Jul 1984 and was completed on 13 Sep 1984. Locations included downtown Seattle and the suburbs of Ballard and Snohomish, WA, where filmmakers were granted permission to shoot at Jorgensen Steel and Chuckanut Charlie’s bar, which stood in for “The Shamrock” bar onscreen.
       The 15 Sep 1985 LAT reported that actress Ellen Burstyn actually got her ears pierced on camera for the role of “Kate.” The scene showcasing “Kate’s” independence was Burstyn’s idea.
       Colin Welland’s story was previously filmed as an hour-long British television show, as noted in the 27 Jul 1984 DV. When the theatrical project went into turnaround at the Ladd Company, Bud Yorkin purchased film rights. After a script rewrite, Yorkin secured the $8 million production budget from private investors. DV announced plans for the filmmakers to release the picture in late 1984 in order to be eligible for Oscar consideration.
       According to the 16 Aug 1984 DV, ITC Entertainment was suing Bud Yorkin. The project originally belonged to Ladd Companypany, where Yorkin reportedly offered his services as producer or director, but Ladd later dropped the project. Kisses At Fifty was then transferred to ITC, who hired Yorkin as producer-director. Yorkin asked to purchase film rights from ITC to produce the feature independently, and ITC drafted a sales agreement on 7 May 1984, which, according to the suit, Yorkin had failed to sign.
       The 8 May 1985 DV announced that the film, now titled Twice In a Lifetime, would hold its world premiere at the Seattle International Film Festival on 9 May 1985.
       The 12 Jul 1985 NYT reported Bud Yorkin’s plans to distribute the picture himself, with consulting help from Norman Levy, former vice chairman at Twentieth Century Fox. Yorkin reported that he turned down offers from studios to distribute the film because he wanted to “nurture” his project. NYT announced the picture would be released in late Oct 1985 at the Beekman theater in New York City, and in Los Angeles and several other cities a few days later.
       According to the 18 Sep 1985 Var review, Twice In a Lifetime screened at the Toronto Festival of Festivals on 9 Sep 1985.
       A benefit premiere was held in Seattle, WA, on 28 Oct 1985 for the Washington State Film Council, as reported in the 14 Nov 1985 HR, which noted that filmmakers brought in $5.5 million to the local economy during production.
       The 6 Nov 1985 DV announced that Yorkin was revising his release strategy to open on Christmas day in several cities, following solid box-office returns from its initial release, which totaled $450,000, according to the 20 Nov 1985 HR. The picture would expand to 100 to 150 screens on 25 Dec 1985. The 5 Dec 1985 LAHExam reported $600,000 in receipts after six-weeks in four theaters, and noted that Yorkin spent $3 million in advertising costs in preparation for wide release on 200 screens.
       The 13 Jan 1986 DV reported that AMPAS reclassified Colin Welland’s screenplay from “original” to “adapted” for Academy Award consideration after reviewing the version of Welland’s BBC-TV release from 1973. AMPAS found too many common elements for the theatrical rewrite to be considered “original.” However, the Writers Guild of America (WGA) maintained their categorization as “original screenplay,” supporting Welland’s argument that although there were similarities to the BBC version, the theatrical release was “not based on that work.”
       According to the 8 Sep 1989 HR, Bud Yorkin filed a $3 million lawsuit against ITC Entertainment claiming ITC “failed to properly market television rights” for Twice In a Lifetime. Yorkin claimed that ITC was packaging his film with other “inferior products.” In a landmark ruling, the jury found ITC Entertainment to be in violation of antitrust laws by packaging Yorkin’s film with fifteen other pictures for syndication, according to the 22 Oct 1992 DV. Antitrust laws maintained that television stations be allowed to purchase individual films from distributors. ITC was found guilty of “block-booking,” and the jury awarded Bud Yorkin $2.45 million. ITC was appealing the decision.
       End credits include the following acknowledgments: “Special Thanks to the kind people of Seattle and its surrounding areas, without whose support and cooperation this film would not have been possible.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
1 Mar 1984.
---
Daily Variety
5 Jun 1984.
---
Daily Variety
13 Jul 1984.
---
Daily Variety
27 Jul 1984
p. 1, 16.
Daily Variety
16 Aug 1984.
---
Daily Variety
22 Apr 1985.
---
Daily Variety
8 May 1985.
---
Daily Variety
6 Nov 1985
p. 13.
Daily Variety
13 Jan 1986
p. 1, 64.
Daily Variety
22 Oct 1992
p. 1, 8.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Aug 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Aug 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Sep 1985
p. 3, 20.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Nov 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Nov 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Sep 1989.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
5 Dec 1985.
---
Los Angeles Times
15 Sep 1985.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 Oct 1985
Section H, p. 1, 4.
New York Times
12 Jul 1985.
---
New York Times
23 Oct 1985
p. 20.
Variety
18 Sep 1985
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Bud Yorkin Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Steadicam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Key grip
2d grip
Dolly grip
Gaffer
Best boy
Video playback
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Assoc film ed
Assoc film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Leadman
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
COSTUMES
Cost des
Costumer
MUSIC
"Twice In A Lifetime" wrt and performed by
Mus rec eng
Asst eng
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom man
Cable man
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
VISUAL EFFECTS
Matte photog
Titles by
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Hairstylist for Ann-Margret
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Unit pub
Scr supv
Prod coord
Prod auditor
Asst to auditor
Loc mgr
Loc asst
Asst to Bud Yorkin
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Extra casting
Craft service
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
"Sincerely," performed by The McGuire Sisters, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
"Re-In-Forcement," performed by Michael Z., courtesy of Shelby Singleton Corp.
"Something On Your Mind," performed by Mighty Joe Young, courtesy of Ovation Records
+
SONGS
"Sincerely," performed by The McGuire Sisters, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
"Re-In-Forcement," performed by Michael Z., courtesy of Shelby Singleton Corp.
"Something On Your Mind," performed by Mighty Joe Young, courtesy of Ovation Records
"Smokin' Violin," performed by Gordon Terry and the Tennessee Guitars, courtesy of Plantation Records.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Kisses at 50
Kisses at Fifty
Release Date:
23 October 1985
Premiere Information:
World premiere at Seattle International Film Festival: 9 May 1985
New York opening: 23 October 1985
Los Angeles opening: 1 November 1985
Production Date:
July 15--September 13 1984
Copyright Claimant:
The Yorkin Company
Copyright Date:
30 December 1985
Copyright Number:
PA274518
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Panaflex® camera and lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
117
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27719
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Holden, Washington, steel mill worker Harry McKenzie, celebrates his fifieth birthday with his wife Kate, and their adult daughters, Helen and Sunny. Sunny’s husband, Keith Sobel, their young daughter, and Helen’s boyfriend, Tim also attend, and they gather around the table in good cheer. Harry invites Kate to go to the Shamrock bar where his friends are throwing him a party, but Kate declines. At the Shamrock, Harry meets new bartender, Audrey, and shamelessly flirts with her all evening. As everyone watches, she gives him a birthday kiss. Days later, Harry takes Audrey on a date. Despite Harry’s thirty-year marriage, Audrey has no reservations about going out with him. She tells him about her dead husband, Tony, as they get to know each other. Before long, they go on a second date, and are seen kissing by Kate McKenzie’s co-worker, Susie. At the hair salon where Kate works, Susie tells her about Harry’s indiscretion. Sometime later, Kate confronts her husband, and Harry does not deny the affair. Instead, Harry visits Audrey and professes his love for her. Sunny Sobel consoles her mother and is furious with her father. At the Shamrock, Harry’s friend Nick chastises him for being unfaithful, but Harry is unapologetic and accuses him of being jealous. Sunny drags her mother into the bar to confront her father, and Harry tries to quiet his daughter. When Harry takes Kate outside to talk, Sunny sees Audrey working behind the bar, and threatens her to stay away from her father. Afterward, Audrey is fired from her job over her small-town indiscretion. ... +


In Holden, Washington, steel mill worker Harry McKenzie, celebrates his fifieth birthday with his wife Kate, and their adult daughters, Helen and Sunny. Sunny’s husband, Keith Sobel, their young daughter, and Helen’s boyfriend, Tim also attend, and they gather around the table in good cheer. Harry invites Kate to go to the Shamrock bar where his friends are throwing him a party, but Kate declines. At the Shamrock, Harry meets new bartender, Audrey, and shamelessly flirts with her all evening. As everyone watches, she gives him a birthday kiss. Days later, Harry takes Audrey on a date. Despite Harry’s thirty-year marriage, Audrey has no reservations about going out with him. She tells him about her dead husband, Tony, as they get to know each other. Before long, they go on a second date, and are seen kissing by Kate McKenzie’s co-worker, Susie. At the hair salon where Kate works, Susie tells her about Harry’s indiscretion. Sometime later, Kate confronts her husband, and Harry does not deny the affair. Instead, Harry visits Audrey and professes his love for her. Sunny Sobel consoles her mother and is furious with her father. At the Shamrock, Harry’s friend Nick chastises him for being unfaithful, but Harry is unapologetic and accuses him of being jealous. Sunny drags her mother into the bar to confront her father, and Harry tries to quiet his daughter. When Harry takes Kate outside to talk, Sunny sees Audrey working behind the bar, and threatens her to stay away from her father. Afterward, Audrey is fired from her job over her small-town indiscretion. Following Sunny’s outburst, Audrey believes she and Harry should end their affair, but Harry asserts that his family’s feelings do not matter to him. Later, Sunny and younger sister, Helen McKenzie, discuss their parents’ troubled marriage. Their brother, Jerry McKenzie, flies to town and tells his sister, Sunny, that their parents have been unhappy for years. Harry tells Kate that he wants a divorce, and he sees Audrey as his second chance. Kate sobs and embraces Harry. He moves into his own apartment feeling as if he has a new lease on life. When he shows Audrey his new home, they both express their excitement at having found each other. Meanwhile, Kate mourns the end of her marriage, and takes time off from the hair salon. Sunny and Helen encourage their mother to get back into life, but Kate yells at them, insisting she needs time. Later, Helen tells Sunny that she is going to marry her boyfriend, Tim, and plans to forego college. Sunny disapproves, relating that marriage is difficult, and Helen is too young. However, she and Kate help Helen plan her small wedding. Before long, Kate begins to feel better and makes some bold choices. She gets her ears pierced for the upcoming wedding, and returns to work, where her friends give her a makeover. Sometime later, they take her to a male strip club. Kate tells a friend that she is somehow surviving after Harry’s departure. When she tells Sunny that she would be willing to take Harry back, Sunny is furious. Kate asserts it is her decision. Meanwhile, Harry’s relationship with Audrey continues to thrive. However, Audrey still worries that Harry might return to his family. She tells him to go to Helen’s wedding and make sure he made the right decision. The night before the wedding, Harry visits Helen, concerned that she is rushing into marriage. Helen gently insists that her relationship with Tim will be different than her parents’ marriage, and embraces her father. At the wedding, Harry embraces his son, Jerry, and tries to make amends with Sunny, but she is not ready to speak to him. Although Kate is cordial, she does not invite Harry back to the family home for the reception. Certain of his decision to be with Audrey, Harry takes her a bouquet of wedding flowers. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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