Blue Steel (1990)

R | 101 mins | Drama | 16 March 1990

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HISTORY

       Principal photography began 22 Aug 1988 in New York City, the 20 Sep 1988 HR noted, and ended in late Nov 1988, according to the 30 Nov 1988 Var. The film was originally scheduled for a summer 1989 release.
       Various early sources, including the 9 Sep 1988 DV and 18 Nov 1988 DV, list the film's production company as True Steel, Inc., which does not appear in the final credits.
       Vestron Pictures formed a production deal with Japanese investors called ZERON Group to make a number of films, including Blue Steel, according to the 9 Jul 1989 Austin American Statesman. The 10 Aug 1988 Var noted that Lightning Pictures, Vestron’s production unit in charge of Blue Steel, scheduled the film for release in spring 1989, but the company folded, according to the 1 Nov 1989 Var and 6 Dec 1989 Long Beach Press-Telegram, and Blue Steel was picked up by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM). After previewing in Jan 1990 at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, UT, the film opened on 16 Mar 1990 with a $1.4 million advertising campaign, the 11 Jul 1990 DV reported.
      End credits acknowledge Exclusive International Pictures, Inc. and Reuter, and give “Special thanks" to: Susan Brooks, Nina Phillips, Anne Heekin-Canedy, Robin King, Alicia Taylor, Anne Montgomery, Shigeru Masuda, Greg Johnson, Susan Streger, Susan Senk, Ed Martin, J. C.; City of New York, Edward I. Koch, Mayor; Mayor’s Office for Film, Theatre and Broadcasting, Patricia Reed Scott, director; The Movie/TV unit of the New York City Police Department, Lt. John ... More Less

       Principal photography began 22 Aug 1988 in New York City, the 20 Sep 1988 HR noted, and ended in late Nov 1988, according to the 30 Nov 1988 Var. The film was originally scheduled for a summer 1989 release.
       Various early sources, including the 9 Sep 1988 DV and 18 Nov 1988 DV, list the film's production company as True Steel, Inc., which does not appear in the final credits.
       Vestron Pictures formed a production deal with Japanese investors called ZERON Group to make a number of films, including Blue Steel, according to the 9 Jul 1989 Austin American Statesman. The 10 Aug 1988 Var noted that Lightning Pictures, Vestron’s production unit in charge of Blue Steel, scheduled the film for release in spring 1989, but the company folded, according to the 1 Nov 1989 Var and 6 Dec 1989 Long Beach Press-Telegram, and Blue Steel was picked up by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM). After previewing in Jan 1990 at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, UT, the film opened on 16 Mar 1990 with a $1.4 million advertising campaign, the 11 Jul 1990 DV reported.
      End credits acknowledge Exclusive International Pictures, Inc. and Reuter, and give “Special thanks" to: Susan Brooks, Nina Phillips, Anne Heekin-Canedy, Robin King, Alicia Taylor, Anne Montgomery, Shigeru Masuda, Greg Johnson, Susan Streger, Susan Senk, Ed Martin, J. C.; City of New York, Edward I. Koch, Mayor; Mayor’s Office for Film, Theatre and Broadcasting, Patricia Reed Scott, director; The Movie/TV unit of the New York City Police Department, Lt. John Gasperin; New York State Governor’s Office for Motion Picture and Television Development, Jaynne Keyes, Deputy Commissioner; The City Hospital Center at Elmhurst/New York City Health and Hospital Corporation; Commodity Exchange, Inc. (COMEX); New York City Transit Authority, Special Events unit.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Austin (TX) American Statesman
9 Jul 1989
p. 9.
Daily Variety
4 Aug 1988
p. 3.
Daily Variety
9 Sep 1988
p. 14.
Daily Variety
11 Nov 1988
p. 6.
Daily Variety
18 Nov 1988
p. 14.
Daily Variety
29 Jan 1990
o, 3, 22.
Daily Variety
20 May 1990
p. 3.
Daily Variety
11 Jul 1990
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jan 1990
p. 4, 24.
Long Beach Press-Telegram
6 Dec 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
9 Oct 1988
Section K, p. 28.
Los Angeles Times
16 Mar 1990
p. 18.
New York Times
16 Mar 1990
p. 18.
Variety
10 Aug 1988
p. 21.
Variety
1 Nov 1989
p. 48.
Variety
30 Nov 1988
p. 16.
Variety
22 Mar 1989
p. 3.
Variety
7 Feb 1990
pp. 33-34.
Variety
4 Apr 1990
p. 30.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Lightning Pictures in association with Precision Films and Mack-Taylor Productions presents
An Edward R. Pressman Production
A Kathryn Bigelow Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Asst unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Best boy elec
Key grip
Dolly grip
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
1st asst picture ed
Apprentice picture ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Lead set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Chargeman scenic
Const coord
Selected lighting in Eugene's apartment by
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Ward prod asst
Asst to cost des
MUSIC
Mus ed
Scoring mixer
Electronic violinist
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
ADR ed
2d ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Re-rec eng (N.Y.)
Re-rec eng (L.A.)
Re-rec eng (L.A.)
Re-rec eng (L.A.)
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff
Main titles des and prod by
Opt eff
MAKEUP
Make-up artist
Hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod office coord
Scr supv
Loc coord
Auditor
Asst prod office coord
Asst to Kathryn Bigelow
Asst to Edward Pressman
Asst to Edward Pressman
Prod assoc
Vestron post prod exec
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Craft services
Teamster coord
Teamster capt
Extras casting
Bramon/Hopkins casting assoc
Bramon/Hopkins casting assoc
Bramon/Hopkins casting asst
Marketing coord
Pub
Post prod supv
Loc equip
Post prod facilities
Completion services by
Completion services by, The Completion Bond Compan
Insurance provided by
Insurance provided by, Albert G. Ruben & Co.
Picture vehicles
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 March 1990
Premiere Information:
Sundance premiere: January 1990
Los Angeles opening: 16 March 1990
New York opening: week of 16 March 1990
Production Date:
22 August--late November 1988
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex Camera by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by CFI
Duration(in mins):
101
Length(in feet):
9,142
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29626
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

New York City Police cadet Megan Turner kicks open a door to an apartment where a man is apparently menacing a woman with a gun. As he aims at Megan, she shoots him, but the woman picks up his gun when Megan looks away and returns fire. As Megan curses her mistake, a training officer tells her she is "dead." Later, following her academy class’s swearing-in ceremonies, Megan takes photos in her uniform with her childhood friend, Tracy Perez, and Tracy’s husband and daughter. The following night, when Megan asks her parents, Frank and Shirley Turner, why they did not attend her graduation, her father expresses his disapproval of his daughter being a cop. On patrol, Megan and partner Officer Jeff Travers stop at a coffee shop, and while Travers is in the bathroom, Megan sees a gunman holding up a store across the street. She enters through a side door and confronts the robber. When he points his gun at her, she kills him, and his .44 magnum pistol lands next to Eugene Hunt, a customer lying on the floor. Eugene grabs the gun and slips away in the confusion. During Megan’s interview with Asst. Chief Stanley Hoyt and homicide detective Nick Mann, they ask why she emptied her gun at the robber, even though it appears he had no gun, and the witnesses are unsure whether he was armed or not. Megan’s mother arrives at the station to apologize for her father, and Megan asks if he still physically abuses her. At the New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street, Eugene works on the “trading floor.” A bell marks the close of the stock market. Alone in ... +


New York City Police cadet Megan Turner kicks open a door to an apartment where a man is apparently menacing a woman with a gun. As he aims at Megan, she shoots him, but the woman picks up his gun when Megan looks away and returns fire. As Megan curses her mistake, a training officer tells her she is "dead." Later, following her academy class’s swearing-in ceremonies, Megan takes photos in her uniform with her childhood friend, Tracy Perez, and Tracy’s husband and daughter. The following night, when Megan asks her parents, Frank and Shirley Turner, why they did not attend her graduation, her father expresses his disapproval of his daughter being a cop. On patrol, Megan and partner Officer Jeff Travers stop at a coffee shop, and while Travers is in the bathroom, Megan sees a gunman holding up a store across the street. She enters through a side door and confronts the robber. When he points his gun at her, she kills him, and his .44 magnum pistol lands next to Eugene Hunt, a customer lying on the floor. Eugene grabs the gun and slips away in the confusion. During Megan’s interview with Asst. Chief Stanley Hoyt and homicide detective Nick Mann, they ask why she emptied her gun at the robber, even though it appears he had no gun, and the witnesses are unsure whether he was armed or not. Megan’s mother arrives at the station to apologize for her father, and Megan asks if he still physically abuses her. At the New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street, Eugene works on the “trading floor.” A bell marks the close of the stock market. Alone in an office bathroom later, Eugene pulls the .44 out of his waistband and pretends to fire it at the mirror. When Megan visits Tracy and her family for a backyard barbecue, Tracy introduces her to Howard, an accountant, but his ardor cools the moment he learns Megan is a policewoman. When Howard asks why a beautiful woman would become a cop, she facetiously claims she loves slamming “people’s heads against walls.” As Howard backs away, Megan tells him he has a broken taillight and his registration is overdue, but then kisses him on the cheek and tells him to “lighten up.” That night, Eugene loads the .44 magnum and walks in the rain. When he trips and falls, an older man approaches to help, but Eugene shoots him. The next day, Asst. Chief Hoyt suspends Megan for unauthorized use of physical force and makes her surrender her badge and gun. Megan leaves the station in the rain. Standing nearby, Eugene hails a taxi and asks her to share it. Caught in standstill traffic, he takes her to an expensive French restaurant, where they acquaint themselves, and Eugene asks for a date the following night. Later, Megan is awakened by Internal affairs officers and taken to a hospital, where Detective Nick Mann shows that her name is crudely etched on the shell casing of a bullet that killed a man. Nick guesses that Megan knows the shooter, and since she is his only lead, he wants her back on the force with “high visibility.” With Asst. Chief Hoyt’s blessings, Nick issues her a detective shield “in name only.” At dinner with Eugene, Megan wonders why a wealthy, well-educated man is interested in a working-class woman like her. He takes her on a helicopter ride over the city, observing that from high up, people are specks who do not matter much. At the end of the evening, Megan invites him into her apartment, but he declines, saying, “Soon.” Nick is waiting inside. He knows about her dinner with Eugene, because she is under surveillance. As she flies over Manhattan in a helicopter, Megan’s door opens and she grabs Eugene’s hand to save herself, but he lets her fall. She awakens from the dream. The telephone rings, and Nick summons her to a homicide. There, he asks if she knows the victim, and if not, why is her name again etched on the shell casing. As Television news reporters discuss the “.44 magnum killer,” Eugene watches as he exercises in his gym. Hearing a voice telling him he is a god feared by men, Eugene screams for it to stop. On a dark street, he shoots a prostitute and smears her blood on his body. Meanwhile, Megan looks through “mug shots” to see if she recognizes anyone. Later, she practices at a firing range. That evening, she meets Eugene outside the station and goes to his apartment at 601 E. 61st Street. As they embrace, he recognizes her gun as a .38 and asks her to aim it at him with both hands. Grasping the barrel, he presses it to his head and admits seeing her “radiance” when he saw her shooting the supermarket robber. Realizing he must have taken the robber’s gun, Megan reads Eugene his rights and calls for backup. Police arrive and take him to jail, where his lawyer, Mel Dawson, accuses Megan of setting Eugene up. Since police have no murder weapon or other evidence, he demands Eugene’s release. Later, Tracy stops at Megan’s apartment, and as they walk downstairs, Eugene grabs Megan from behind, shoots Tracy, and knocks Megan unconscious. Awakening at the hospital, Megan tells Nick they have to stop Eugene. They arrest him at his apartment, but again, Mel Dawson dismantles the charges against his client, because Megan never saw his face. When Nick takes Megan home, she cries for Tracy, and he tells her to take the next day off. Visiting her parents’ house in the suburbs, Megan asks about the bruises on her mother’s arm, and when her father tells her to shut up, she slams him against a wall, handcuffs him, and takes him for a ride, warning that she will jail him the next time. Returning to the house, Megan finds Eugene waiting in the living room, charming her mother. Television news broadcasts a story about the .44 magnum killer. Eugene suddenly kisses Megan and leaves. That night, she and Nick stake out Eugene’s apartment. When morning comes, Eugene has a panic attack as he dresses for work and runs into Central Park, where he frantically digs at several spots, looking for his pistol. Megan approaches, bares her holstered pistol, and dares Eugene to lunge for it, but Nick grabs her and lets Eugene run away. Megan speculates that Eugene will return for the gun when he calms down and remembers where he buried it. Staking out the area that night, she sees a flashlight in the park. Before Nick realizes it, she handcuffs his hand to the steering wheel. She runs toward the light, but discovering the person is a bag lady, she returns to the car, where Eugene has placed his gun to Nick’s head. Megan shoots Eugene in the arm and gives chase, but loses him. Slipping into Megan’s apartment, Eugene pulls the bullet out of his arm. He hides when Nick and Megan arrive, and spies on them as they make love. Wrapping his pistol with a towel, he shoots Nick in the bathroom as a police car siren goes by, covering the sound. Eugene grabs Megan in bed, but she pushes him away grabs her gun, and wounds him as he escapes. Later, at the hospital, Asst. Chief Hoyt tells Megan that Nick will survive. After a nurse gives Megan a sedative, she relives moments with Eugene. Calling the guard sitting outside her door for a cigarette, she knocks him out, puts on her uniform, and hunts for Eugene. In a subway, she sees him behind her, and they wound each other in a shootout. Despite her bloody shoulder, Megan chases him, and when she runs out of bullets, she reloads with only one hand. As Eugene approaches, Megan pulls a driver out of a car, gets in, and runs him down. However, Eugene gets back up and fires at her. When he runs out of bullets, she pumps three shots into his chest, killing him. Police arrive and help her out of the car.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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