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HISTORY

       Director Sam Raimi told the 8 May 1987 Morning Call (Allentown, PA) he was writing a “thriller” called The Dark Man for Universal Pictures. During production, the 10 May 1989 and 5 Jul 1989 editions of Var also referred to the film as that title. Filming began 19 Apr 1989. The camera crew bought an advertisement in the 11 Aug 1989 DV congratulating Sam Raimi and director of photography Bill Pope on “the completion of principal photography.” The 31 Aug 1990 Santa Barbara News-Press revealed the film’s budget to be $14 million, but the 24 Aug 1990 Long Beach Press-Telegram suggested that Universal’s promotional and distribution expenses raised the total cost to $30 million. Raimi, who also wrote the story and co-scripted Darkman, claimed it was influenced by early horror films, including Phantom of the Opera (1925, see entry), Frankenstein (1931, see entry), and The Mummy (1932, see entry). Another obvious influence is The Invisible Man (1933, see entry).
       Raimi executive produced a 1992 television movie pilot for Darkman, using Larry Drake as “Robert G. Durant,” but replaced Liam Neeson and Frances McDormand with Christopher Bowen and Kathleen York. Sequels to the theatrical film include two direct-to-video titles, Darkman II: The Return of Durant (1995) and Darkman III: Die Darkman Die (1996), both starring Arnold Vosloo as the title character.

      End credits contain the following information: “This film is dedicated to the memory of Dale Johnson,” and “Filmed in Los Angeles, ... More Less

       Director Sam Raimi told the 8 May 1987 Morning Call (Allentown, PA) he was writing a “thriller” called The Dark Man for Universal Pictures. During production, the 10 May 1989 and 5 Jul 1989 editions of Var also referred to the film as that title. Filming began 19 Apr 1989. The camera crew bought an advertisement in the 11 Aug 1989 DV congratulating Sam Raimi and director of photography Bill Pope on “the completion of principal photography.” The 31 Aug 1990 Santa Barbara News-Press revealed the film’s budget to be $14 million, but the 24 Aug 1990 Long Beach Press-Telegram suggested that Universal’s promotional and distribution expenses raised the total cost to $30 million. Raimi, who also wrote the story and co-scripted Darkman, claimed it was influenced by early horror films, including Phantom of the Opera (1925, see entry), Frankenstein (1931, see entry), and The Mummy (1932, see entry). Another obvious influence is The Invisible Man (1933, see entry).
       Raimi executive produced a 1992 television movie pilot for Darkman, using Larry Drake as “Robert G. Durant,” but replaced Liam Neeson and Frances McDormand with Christopher Bowen and Kathleen York. Sequels to the theatrical film include two direct-to-video titles, Darkman II: The Return of Durant (1995) and Darkman III: Die Darkman Die (1996), both starring Arnold Vosloo as the title character.

      End credits contain the following information: “This film is dedicated to the memory of Dale Johnson,” and “Filmed in Los Angeles, California.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
11 Aug 1989.
---
Daily Variety
20 Aug 1990
p. 2, 12.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Aug 1990
p. 23, 27.
Long Beach Press-Telegram
24 Aug 1990
Section B, p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
26 Feb 1989
Section L, p. 33.
Los Angeles Times
24 Aug 1990
Calendar, p. 10.
Morning Call (Allentown, PA)
8 May 1987
Section D, p. 1.
New York Times
24 Aug 1990
p. 15.
Santa Barbara News-Press
31 Aug 1990.
---
Toronto Star
16 Aug 1990
Section E, p. 1.
Variety
10 May 1989
p. 34.
Variety
5 Jul 1989
p. 24.
Variety
26 Jul 1989
p. 26.
Variety
22 Aug 1990
pp. 74-75.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Universal Pictures Presents
A Renaissance Pictures Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
1st asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Line prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Loader
Loader
Still photog
Aerial photog
2d unit photog
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Grip
Grip
Helicopter key grip
Helicopter best boy grip
Helicopter dolly grip
Helicopter rigging grip
Helicopter rigging grip
Helicopter rigging grip
Helicopter rigging grip
Specialized rigging
Lighting and grip equip supplied by
Cam equip provided by
Film stock provided by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Storyboard artist
City futurist
Graphic artist
High steel structural eng consultant
High steel structural eng consultant
Art dept coord
Art dept prod asst
FILM EDITORS
Supv ed
Supv ed
Feature ed
Feature ed
1st asst ed
1st asst ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Montage ed
Negative cutters
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Set des
Asst set dec
On set dresser
On set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Scenic artist
Asst scenic artist
Painter
Painter
Painter
Prop master
Asst props
2d asst props
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Bio-Press eng and const by
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Stand by carpenter
Const prod asst
Const prod asst
COSTUMES
Cost des
Key costumer
Ward asst
Bandage cost
Bandage cost
MUSIC
Cond & Addl mus orch
Mus scoring mixer
Mus ed
Mus contractor
Score rec at
Addl mus by
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd mixer
Boom op
Post prod sd by
ADR supv
ADR ed
ADR ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Digital ed
Digital ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley supv
Foley walker
Foley walker
Foley walker
Foley mixer
ADR rec at
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
Sd transfers
Sd transfers
Re-rec facilities
Mixer
Sd laboratory
VISUAL EFFECTS
Montage seq & Main title by
Opt eff created by
Opt eff created by
Visual eff miniature seq by
Mechanical spec eff
Mechanical spec eff
Mechanical spec eff
Mechanical spec eff
Pyrotechnical spec eff
Visual eff supv
Asst opt eff
Anim eff, VCE Effects
Anim eff, VCE Effects
Opt eff, VCE Effects
Opt eff, VCE Effects
Opt eff, VCE Effects
Opt eff, VCE Effects
Opt eff, VCE Effects
Opt eff, VCE Effects
Photog, VCE Effects
Photog, VCE Effects
Photog, VCE Effects
Ed, VCE Effects
Prod admin, VCE Effects
Visual eff supv, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Cin, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Visual eff prod, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Line prod, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Cam op, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Gaffer, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Key modelmaker, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Key modelmaker, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Miniature set & Rig supv, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Spec eff, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Spec eff, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Modelmaker, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Modelmaker, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Modelmaker, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Modelmaker, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Modelmaker, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Modelmaker, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Modelmaker, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Modelmaker, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Modelmaker, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Miniature set op, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Miniature set op, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Const, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Const, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Const, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Scenic artist, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Scenic artist, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Scenic artist, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Sculptor, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Sculptor, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Visual eff asst, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Visual eff asst, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Cam by, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Addl set rigging by, 4-Ward Productions, Inc.
Visual eff supv, Introvision Systems International
Prod/Art dir, Introvision Systems International, I
Assoc prod, Introvision Systems International, Inc
Tech dir, Introvision Systems International, Inc.
Prod mgr, Introvision Systems International, Inc.
Prod coord, Introvision Systems International, Inc
Cam, Introvision Systems International, Inc.
Cam, Introvision Systems International, Inc.
Cam asst, Introvision Systems International, Inc.
Cam asst, Introvision Systems International, Inc.
Cam asst, Introvision Systems International, Inc.
Asst art dir, Introvision Systems International, I
Asst art dir, Introvision Systems International, I
Matte painter, Introvision Systems International,
Matte painter, Introvision Systems International,
Gaffer, Introvision Systems International, Inc.
Grip, Introvision Systems International, Inc.
Const coord, Introvision Systems International, In
Model shop supv, Introvision Systems International
Model shop foreman, Introvision Systems Internatio
Prod asst, Introvision Systems International, Inc.
Model shop, Introvision Systems International, Inc
Model shop, Introvision Systems International, Inc
Model shop, Introvision Systems International, Inc
"Strack City" visual eff by
Supv of spec visual eff, "Strack City" visual FX b
Supv of spec visual FX, "Strack City" visual eff b
Prod mgr, "Strack City" visual eff by Matte World
Eff cam op, "Strack City" visual eff by Matte Worl
Eff cam asst, "Strack City" visual eff by Matte Wo
Model maker, "Strack City" visual eff by Matte Wor
Scenic artist, "Strack City" visual eff by Matte W
Opt compositing
Opt compositing
Opt compositing
Computer anim and displays by
Computer anim and displays by
Computer anim and displays by
Computer anim and displays by
Computer anim and displays by
Organic/Microscope eff by
MAKEUP
Make-up eff by
Make-up eff by
Key make-up artist
Key hair stylist
Key hair stylist
Key sculptor/Painter, Make-up eff crew
Sculptor, Make-up eff crew
Sculptor, Make-up eff crew
Sculptor, Make-up eff crew
Sculptor, Make-up eff crew
Prod painter, Make-up eff crew
Bandage cost, Make-up eff crew
Bandage cost, Make-up eff crew
Key moldmaker, Make-up eff crew
Gelatin specialist, Make-up eff crew
Mechanical des, Make-up eff crew
Mechanical des, Make-up eff crew
Mechanical des, Make-up eff crew
Mechanical des, Make-up eff crew
Mechanical des, Make-up eff crew
Mechanical des, Make-up eff crew
Mechanical des, Make-up eff crew
Eff tech, Make-up eff crew
Eff tech, Make-up eff crew
Eff tech, Make-up eff crew
Eff tech, Make-up eff crew
Eff tech, Make-up eff crew
Eff tech, Make-up eff crew
Burning hand anim, Make-up eff crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Prod coord
Prod secy
Asst to the prods
Unit pub
Prod auditor
Asst auditor
Asst accountant
Key set prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Aerial helicopter pilot
Loc mgr
Loc asst
Medic
Craft service
Craft service
Security
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Stock footage dir
Stock footage
Stock footage
Extras casting
Casting coord
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Give It To Me," written and performed by Judy Valenti
PERFORMER
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Titles:
Dark Man
The Dark Man
Release Date:
24 August 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 24 August 1990
New York opening: week of 24 August 1990
Production Date:
19 April--early August 1989
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 December 1990
Copyright Number:
PA504213
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
96
Length(in feet):
8,578
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30606
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Robert G. Durant and his thugs, Rudy Guzman, Rick Anderson, Smiley, Skip, and Pauly Mazzucci, take over a drug operation in a warehouse gunfight. Durant punishes the kingpin, Eddie Black, by slicing off his fingers with a cigar cutter. Meanwhile, scientist Peyton Westlake and his assistant, Yakitito, experiment with artificial “liquid” flesh. They create a computer hologram of Yakitito’s nose and sheath it with skin, but the flesh dissolves after ninety-nine minutes. That night, Peyton makes love to his attorney girl friend, Julie Hastings. In the morning, Julie telephones her boss to tell him he accidentally gave her a secret memorandum listing payments their client, developer Louis Strack, Jr. of Strack Industries, made to city zoning commissioners. Peyton sets a cup of coffee on the memorandum, leaving a circular stain. He proposes marriage as Julie leaves, but she asks for time to think about it. Later, Strack admits he bribed the commissioners, but asks Julie to understand that his futuristic waterfront development project, “Strack City,” will benefit everyone. He asks for the document, but Julie says she left it at Peyton’s. Later, as Peyton and Yakitito run another liquid skin test, the laboratory lights go out. Noticing that cells under his microscope remain stable past ninety-nine minutes, Peyton realizes that light is the destabilizing factor. Moments later, Durant and his men raid the laboratory to retrieve the memorandum. They kill Yakitito, push Peyton’s face into a vat of acid, and set a timer to blow the place up. As they leave in their cars, Julie arrives to agree to Peyton’s marriage proposal. Suddenly the laboratory explodes, blasting Peyton through a window into a nearby river. Julie is the only ... +


Robert G. Durant and his thugs, Rudy Guzman, Rick Anderson, Smiley, Skip, and Pauly Mazzucci, take over a drug operation in a warehouse gunfight. Durant punishes the kingpin, Eddie Black, by slicing off his fingers with a cigar cutter. Meanwhile, scientist Peyton Westlake and his assistant, Yakitito, experiment with artificial “liquid” flesh. They create a computer hologram of Yakitito’s nose and sheath it with skin, but the flesh dissolves after ninety-nine minutes. That night, Peyton makes love to his attorney girl friend, Julie Hastings. In the morning, Julie telephones her boss to tell him he accidentally gave her a secret memorandum listing payments their client, developer Louis Strack, Jr. of Strack Industries, made to city zoning commissioners. Peyton sets a cup of coffee on the memorandum, leaving a circular stain. He proposes marriage as Julie leaves, but she asks for time to think about it. Later, Strack admits he bribed the commissioners, but asks Julie to understand that his futuristic waterfront development project, “Strack City,” will benefit everyone. He asks for the document, but Julie says she left it at Peyton’s. Later, as Peyton and Yakitito run another liquid skin test, the laboratory lights go out. Noticing that cells under his microscope remain stable past ninety-nine minutes, Peyton realizes that light is the destabilizing factor. Moments later, Durant and his men raid the laboratory to retrieve the memorandum. They kill Yakitito, push Peyton’s face into a vat of acid, and set a timer to blow the place up. As they leave in their cars, Julie arrives to agree to Peyton’s marriage proposal. Suddenly the laboratory explodes, blasting Peyton through a window into a nearby river. Julie is the only attendee at the burial of Peyton’s ear, the only part of his body that could be found. Elsewhere, Peyton has been fished out of the river, and is being kept in a special burn ward as a homeless “John Doe.” In order to prevent endless agony, a female surgeon deadens his brain’s pain center. She explains to colleagues that the man’s pain-free condition will amplify his emotions, which will be his only remaining stimulation. As a result, he will have internal rages and augmented strength. With his face and hands in bandages, Peyton breaks his restraints and escapes from the hospital. In an alley he finds a cape-like coat and puts it on. At night, he sees Julie on the street and approaches her, but she recoils in terror and runs. Returning to his destroyed lab, Peyton gathers his surviving equipment, carries it away in a supermarket shopping cart to an abandoned warehouse, and sets up a new operation. He scans a damaged photograph of himself into his computer and builds a hologram, but because of “imperfect digitization,” the facial reconstruction will take roughly twenty-three days. Later, at a society party, Strack asks Julie if she has come to terms with what was in the memorandum. He wants a closer relationship, but she still mourns Peyton. Outside a window, Peyton watches them. Suddenly, he recognizes Robert Durant and Rick Anderson as two of his attackers and struggles to contain his rage. As Rick leaves the party, Peyton drags him into a sewer and tortures him into confessing everything. Removing a manhole cover, Payton pushes his captive up into traffic, and a truck smashes Rick’s head. Later, Peyton takes photographs as Rudy Guzman, sitting at a delicatessen’s window table, slides a briefcase of money to Pauly Mazzucci. In his laboratory, Peyton scans the photographs into his computer and builds holograms of Pauly’s head and left hand and forearm. Later, still bandaged, he sneaks into Pauly’s apartment and finds him asleep. He chloroforms Pauly, leaves airline tickets with Pauly and Rick’s names on them, puts on his Pauly mask and Pauly’s blue suit, and meets Rudy at the delicatessen for another money pickup. Rudy notices something wrong, but gives him the money, and “Pauly” hurriedly leaves. Not long afterward, Durant and Rudy break into Pauly’s apartment and find him asleep, next to airline tickets to Rio de Janiero, Brazil. Despite Pauly’s denials, they throw him out a window. Watching from a nearby bench, Peyton feels his face dissolving and rushes away. He continues to experiment, but cannot extend his time past a hundred minutes. In a rampage, he smashes some of his equipment until a mental image of Julie calms him. At that moment, a computer tells him the reconstruction program is complete. Wearing a new Peyton Westlake face and a hairpiece, he confronts Julie at his gravesite and reassures her that he is alive. They embrace and declare their love, but he cannot stay long because he is under special treatment at a hospital. That night, when Durant telephones Rudy Guzman to set up a money-collection appointment with Hung Fat in Chinatown, Peyton records the conversation. At the lab, he uses the tape to practice speaking in Durant’s voice. Then, wearing a Durant mask, Peyton robs a convenience store with a gun and taunts police as he stares into the security camera. Later, Durant is arrested, and Peyton takes his place with Rudy when they visit Hung Fat to collect money he owes. However, Durant is released from jail and arrives in Chinatown in time to confront Peyton leaving Hung Fat’s building. As Durant and his look-alike struggle Rudy does not know which one to shoot. Feeling his face dissolving, Peyton escapes with the money. Later, at a carnival, Julie asks Peyton to reveal the hospital where he is staying, so that she can be with him, but he tells her he is not ready. When he asks if she found someone else after she thought he had died, Julie admits that a man “comforted” her, but she remained faithful. Hoping to win her a stuffed elephant, Peyton knocks over metal bottles with a ball, but the concession worker insists he stepped over the line. As the man pushes him away, Peyton goes into a rage and breaks his fingers. Julie is shocked. Peyton feels his face begin to change and runs away, but Julie follows him to his lab and sees his artificial face dissolve on a table. She calls out that now she understands Peyton’s problem and wants to help him, but he remains hidden. At Louis Strack’s apartment, Julie says she cannot see him anymore because Peyton is alive. While Strack takes a telephone call in another room, she sees the memorandum on his desk, with Peyton’s coffee stain on it, and realizes Strack ordered the attack on the laboratory. Strack assures Julie he will not harm her, because nobody would believe her. After she leaves, he tells Robert Durant that Julie knows everything, but more important, he knows who is behind the theft of their money. Since Durant did not fulfill his job killing Peyton, Strack orders him to follow Julie to the scientist and dispose of him. As Julie reaches the laboratory, Durant’s thugs arrive in cars, kidnap her, and assault Peyton’s stronghold. Above them in a helicopter, Durant fires exploding shells from a shotgun. Cleverly using his masks, Peyton dispatches Rudy and other henchmen, blows up the laboratory, and grabs onto the helicopter as it lands on the roof. Durant dislodges him as the helicopter takes off, but Peyton grabs a hook attached to a cable. Durant drags him all over the city and tries to smash him into buildings and cars. Landing on top of a tractor-trailer, Peyton hooks the cable to the truck cab as it enters a tunnel. Durant’s helicopter smashes into the concrete entrance and explodes. Knowing Strack is holding Julie, Peyton, disguised as Durant, meets him and two henchman at Strack City. They ride to the top of a building under construction, where Strack demonstrates his ability to walk on beams. Using a trick question, Strack discovers that Durant is not Durant and pulls off the mask, revealing Peyton’s ravaged face, As they fight among the beams, Peyton sends the henchmen and Strack falling to their deaths and saves Julie from a similar fate. Afterward, she tells him she could learn to live with him, but Peyton admits that he has become a monster who has done monstrous things since his disfigurement and learned to live with it. Assuring Julie that “Peyton is gone,” but will be “everywhere and nowhere” to fight evil, he hurries away. Julie follows him onto a busy street, but cannot find him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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