Everybody Wins (1990)

R | 97 mins | Mystery | 19 January 1990

Director:

Karel Reisz

Writer:

Arthur Miller

Producer:

Jeremy Thomas

Cinematographer:

Ian Baker

Editor:

John Bloom

Production Designer:

Peter Larkin

Production Company:

Recorded Picture Company
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HISTORY

       Everybody Wins was the first of six films planned as an international package backed by the Japanese film company, Shochiku-Fuji, and several European banks led by Pierson Heldring & Pierson, a Dutch company. The total budget for all six films was set at $120 million.
       The 22 Jan 1990 LAT noted that screenwriter Arthur Miller based the story “loosely” on the false conviction of Canaan, CT, teenager Peter Reilly in 1974 for murdering his mother. Miller originally wrote a 1982 play called Some Kind of Love Story, then developed it into the screenplay, originally called Almost Everybody Wins, according to the 13 Dec 1987 Newsday. The 16 Aug 1986 SF Chronicle noted that producer Linda Yellen was set to direct. A year later, director Peter Yates was attached to the project. Neither was credited with directing the final film.
       According to studio production notes in AMPAS library files, rehearsals took place in New York City before the cast and crew moved to the DEG Studios in Wilmington, NC, where interior scenes were filmed for eight weeks. The 3 Mar 1989 HR reported that principal photography began 23 Jan 1989. Three to four weeks of exterior scenes were shot in Norwich, CT, an old mill town that stood in for the fictional “Highbury,” the 5 May 1989 HR noted. Important Norwich locations included a courthouse and the abandoned King Cooley Thermos factory on Connecticut’s Thames River. The production’s seventeen days of location shooting employed 300 Norwich extras and added $2 million to the local economy, according to the 2 Feb 1990 ... More Less

       Everybody Wins was the first of six films planned as an international package backed by the Japanese film company, Shochiku-Fuji, and several European banks led by Pierson Heldring & Pierson, a Dutch company. The total budget for all six films was set at $120 million.
       The 22 Jan 1990 LAT noted that screenwriter Arthur Miller based the story “loosely” on the false conviction of Canaan, CT, teenager Peter Reilly in 1974 for murdering his mother. Miller originally wrote a 1982 play called Some Kind of Love Story, then developed it into the screenplay, originally called Almost Everybody Wins, according to the 13 Dec 1987 Newsday. The 16 Aug 1986 SF Chronicle noted that producer Linda Yellen was set to direct. A year later, director Peter Yates was attached to the project. Neither was credited with directing the final film.
       According to studio production notes in AMPAS library files, rehearsals took place in New York City before the cast and crew moved to the DEG Studios in Wilmington, NC, where interior scenes were filmed for eight weeks. The 3 Mar 1989 HR reported that principal photography began 23 Jan 1989. Three to four weeks of exterior scenes were shot in Norwich, CT, an old mill town that stood in for the fictional “Highbury,” the 5 May 1989 HR noted. Important Norwich locations included a courthouse and the abandoned King Cooley Thermos factory on Connecticut’s Thames River. The production’s seventeen days of location shooting employed 300 Norwich extras and added $2 million to the local economy, according to the 2 Feb 1990 HR. The 11 Jun 1989 NYT cited the film’s budget at $19 million.
       The 24 Jan 1990 Var and 5 Feb 1990 New York reported that Orion Pictures was so disappointed with the final cut that it “opened the film cold with no press screenings” and “dumped” it into theaters with little advertising. The 24 Jan 1990 Var review deemed the film “obscure and artificial” and “nearly unreleasable,” with “virtually no chance of attracting an audience.” A couple of reviewers, including the 22 Jan 1990 HR, speculated that the film’s story and character lapses were the result of scenes being shortened or excised. Orion claimed that stars Nick Nolte and Debra Winger were “less than helpful” in promoting Everybody Wins.
      End credits give the following information: “The producers wish to thank: City of Wilmington; State of North Carolina Film Commission; City of Norwich; State of Connecticut Film Commission; Thermos on the Thames; Daniel Malchman; NBC News Video Archives; North Carolina Film Studios, Inc.; Lou Anne Colombo & Beryl Handler.” Also, “Financed by Film Trustees Limited, in association with Shochiku-Fuji Co Ltd, Pierson Heldring & Pierson N.V., Guinness Mahon & Co Ltd, and Creditanstalt Bankverein.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Globe and Mail (Toronto)
4 Nov 1988
Section C, p. 3.
Hollywood Drama-Logue
16 Feb 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jan 1990
p. 4, 44.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jan 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Mar 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 May 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Feb 1990.
---
LAHExam
24 Nov 1988
Section B, p. 1, 6.
Los Angeles Times
21 Jan 1990
p.
Los Angeles Times
22 Jan 1990
p. 4.
New York
5 Feb 1990.
---
New York Times
11 Jun 1989
p. 19, 22-23.
New York Times
20 Jan 1990
p. 13.
Newsday (Long Island, NY)
13 Dec 1987
p. 17.
San Francisco Chronicle
16 Aug 1986
p. 36.
Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, FL)
23 Jan 1989
p. 5D.
Telegram & Gazette (Worcester, MA)
18 Mar 1989
p. 24.
Variety
24 Jan 1990
p. 21.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
An Orion Pictures Release
Jeremy Thomas presents
A Karel Reisz film
Made by The Recorded Picture Company Incorporated
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Loader
Still photog
Addl stills
Steadicam op
Key grip
Best boy grip
Gaffer
Best boy elec
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Apprentice ed
Asst ed (US)
SET DECORATORS
Asst set dec
Asst set dec
Leadman
Propmaster
Propman
Const coord
Scenic chargeman
Standby painter
Sculptor
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Ward supv
Ward supv
MUSIC
Addl mus
Mus supv
Score cond and arr by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cable person
Supv sd ed
Sd asst
Sd asst
Foley ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles opt by
Main title des by
MAKEUP
Debra Winger's hairstylist
Nick Nolte's hairstylist
Debra Winger's make-up artist
Nick Nolte's make-up artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod office coord
Financial controller
Prod accountant
Loc mgr
Asst to the prod
Asst prod office coord
Asst to Mr. Nolte
Post-prod supv
International pub
Loc co-ord
Loc co-ord
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver capt
Driver capt
Craft service
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Casting asst
Addl casting North Carolina
Addl casting Connecticut
Addl casting New York
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Catering by
Post prod (London)
Completion guarantee supplied by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Utility stunt
Utility stunt
Utility stunt
COLOR PERSONNEL
Prints by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Some Kind of Love Story by Arthur Miller (production date undetermined).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Seduced," performed by Leon Redbone, courtesy of Emerald City Records/Atlantic Recording Corporation, by arrangement with Warner Special Products, published by Warner Chappell Music Limited
"Polly Wolly Doodle," performed by Leon Redbone, traditional arrangement Leon Redbone, produced by Beryl Handler, published by Halemount Limited/Recorded Picture Company Incorporated
"A Hot Time In The Old Town Tonight," performed by Leon Redbone, traditional arrangement Leon Redbone, produced by Beryl Handler, published by Halemount Limited/Recorded Picture Company Incorporated
+
SONGS
"Seduced," performed by Leon Redbone, courtesy of Emerald City Records/Atlantic Recording Corporation, by arrangement with Warner Special Products, published by Warner Chappell Music Limited
"Polly Wolly Doodle," performed by Leon Redbone, traditional arrangement Leon Redbone, produced by Beryl Handler, published by Halemount Limited/Recorded Picture Company Incorporated
"A Hot Time In The Old Town Tonight," performed by Leon Redbone, traditional arrangement Leon Redbone, produced by Beryl Handler, published by Halemount Limited/Recorded Picture Company Incorporated
"Sympathy And Acknowledgement," composed & performed by Mark Isham, ℗
1983 Windham Hill Productions Inc.
"One Fine Day," Madame Butterfly, composed by Giacomo Puccini, sung by Veronika Kincses, performed by The Hungarian State Opera Orchestra and Chamber Chorus, courtesy of Hungarolon Records
"Hymn," composed by Paul Williams, performed by Paul Williams, published by Halemount Limited, Recorded Picture Company Incorporated. Music score recorded at Snakeranch Studios, London. Engineer Austin Ince. "Polly Wolly Doodle" & "A Hot Time In The Old Town Tonight" recorded at Soundtrack Studios, New York.
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DETAILS
Release Date:
19 January 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 19 January 1990
Production Date:
23 January--April 1989
Copyright Claimant:
Film Trustees, Ltd.
Copyright Date:
9 April 1990
Copyright Number:
PA464026
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Panaflex® Cameras and Lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
97
Length(in feet):
8,720
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30048
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Private investigator Tom O’Toole drives to Highbury, Connecticut, to see Angela Crispini about a court transcript she sent to him. Although Tom agreed only to discuss the case, Angela has set up an appointment to visit Felix Daniels, the convict she believes is innocent of murdering his uncle, Dr. Victor Daniels. Angela treats Tom seductively, and gushes over how he overturned State Prosecutor Charlie Haggerty’s evidence in an earlier kidnapping trial. Tom says his only interest in the case is that Haggerty tried to have his detective license revoked, and he wants another opportunity to humiliate him. On the drive to the correctional facility, Angela claims a cancer scare made her give up alcohol and sex, and now she feels “purified.” Tom, whose wife died three years earlier, says he has “mixed feelings” about sex. At the facility, Felix complains that his lawyer failed to properly defend him. Scanning the court transcript, Tom notes that the only evidence against Felix, a tooth from his comb found at the murder scene, was submitted days after the investigation and is therefore suspect. Tom agrees to help, but on the day of Felix’s hearing, Judge Lublonsky denies the young man’s appeal. Leaving the courthouse, Tom greets retired judge Harry Murdoch, whom he befriended during the kidnapping trial, and Murdoch invites him to visit soon. When Tom accompanies Angela to her apartment, he notices a photograph of her on a tropical beach, sitting on the shoulders of a man whose face is obscured. Angela, who has changed into a bathrobe, confesses that she knows who murdered Dr. Daniels, and so do the police, but they let him go. She needs more proof before ... +


Private investigator Tom O’Toole drives to Highbury, Connecticut, to see Angela Crispini about a court transcript she sent to him. Although Tom agreed only to discuss the case, Angela has set up an appointment to visit Felix Daniels, the convict she believes is innocent of murdering his uncle, Dr. Victor Daniels. Angela treats Tom seductively, and gushes over how he overturned State Prosecutor Charlie Haggerty’s evidence in an earlier kidnapping trial. Tom says his only interest in the case is that Haggerty tried to have his detective license revoked, and he wants another opportunity to humiliate him. On the drive to the correctional facility, Angela claims a cancer scare made her give up alcohol and sex, and now she feels “purified.” Tom, whose wife died three years earlier, says he has “mixed feelings” about sex. At the facility, Felix complains that his lawyer failed to properly defend him. Scanning the court transcript, Tom notes that the only evidence against Felix, a tooth from his comb found at the murder scene, was submitted days after the investigation and is therefore suspect. Tom agrees to help, but on the day of Felix’s hearing, Judge Lublonsky denies the young man’s appeal. Leaving the courthouse, Tom greets retired judge Harry Murdoch, whom he befriended during the kidnapping trial, and Murdoch invites him to visit soon. When Tom accompanies Angela to her apartment, he notices a photograph of her on a tropical beach, sitting on the shoulders of a man whose face is obscured. Angela, who has changed into a bathrobe, confesses that she knows who murdered Dr. Daniels, and so do the police, but they let him go. She needs more proof before she can name the killer, but in the meantime he should talk to Amy, a local “biker” girl. Tom objects to Angela withholding information, but she distracts him with sex. Later, Tom returns home, where his sister, Connie, has lived with him since his wife died. Around midnight, Angela telephones and asks him to return, but Tom says he will see her tomorrow. Connie tells Tom that Angela sounds “ditzy” and appears to be playing games. The next day, Tom visits Amy’s shack, next to an old cemetery, where two men with motorcycles are burning something. Amy says she and Angela used to travel to Bimini Island in the Bahamas together. Although Angela was supposed to let her know Tom was coming, Amy says she never called. At that moment, Angela telephones and tells him to stop talking to Amy. When Tom hangs up, Amy suggests he visit her boyfriend, Jerry, because he is the one who murdered Dr. Daniels. Amy explains that Jerry surrendered, but police brought him home, still bloody, and failed to charge him. Before Tom leaves, he goes to the cemetery and sees the burnt bones of an animal next to the plinth of the missing statuary. The name on the plinth is Major Jerome Seth McCall, who died in 1893. Tom drives to an abandoned mill, which Jerry has converted into a motorcycle repair shop. Jerry is not there, but in the middle of the shop is a religious shrine whose centerpiece is the statue of Major McCall, with metal angel wings attached. Suddenly, Angela steps out of the shadows and berates Tom for coming without consulting her. Angela’s speech patterns have changed, as if she has a different personality. Tom goes home and decides to forget the case, but as he reviews the trial transcript, he cannot see how Charlie Haggerty obtained a conviction based on the evidence. The next day he spies on the mill with binoculars and watches as Highbury police talk cordially to Jerry. That evening, when Tom stumbles upon Angela walking the streets and nursing a black eye, she does not recall confronting him at Jerry’s garage. Again, she seduces him, and as they kiss, a police cruiser pulls up, and Highbury Police Chief Bellanca glares at them. Later, as Tom and Angela make love at her apartment, a passing cruiser flashes a light through the window. The next day, Tom visits Charlie Haggerty’s office to announce that Felix retained him to find new evidence and reopen the murder case. Chief Bellanca mocks him for sleeping with, and taking the word of, a known prostitute, but Haggerty assures Tom he will not obstruct any “legitimate” investigation. When Tom visits Judge Murdoch, the older man agrees that Haggerty’s case was flimsy, but suggests that Tom forget about it, because Haggerty is running for state senate and will not let him overturn Felix’s conviction. Later, Tom asks Angela about her sexual history, and she retorts that her father raped her for years. She turns on him again, bitterly offering herself as a whore. Tom leaves in disgust, drives to Amy’s house, and convinces her to accompany him to the mill. They find Jerry welding his metal altar to Major McCall. Recognizing Tom from media coverage of the kidnapping case, Jerry shows him a Grand Army of the Republic knife, claiming the Civil War officer personally gave it to him. Tom takes Jerry and Amy to a diner for pizza, but the couple fights and Jerry wants to leave. Tom gives him his home telephone number before they go. When he returns to Angela’s, she is angry that he spoke with Jerry. She confesses that Dr. Daniels was her psychiatrist, and that they had a relationship. Again, Tom and Angela have sex. Later, Tom drives to the doctor’s empty house, goes inside, and finds the words “Jerry is God,” written in what seems like blood, on a wall. Returning home, Tom argues with Connie, who thinks his involvement with Angela has clouded his judgment. Suddenly, Jerry telephones and asks Tom to set up a meeting with Angela. However, Angela is afraid of Jerry, and explains that he ran drugs for Dr. Daniels, who was Highbury’s “main man” in the local narcotics trade. When Daniels reneged on his promise to finance the Major McCall church, Jerry went into a rage and killed him. Police cannot arrest Jerry because he knows too much about many important people in Highbury. Angela also confesses that she had a sexual relationship with Charlie Haggerty for two years. She tried to dissuade him from framing Felix, but despite his own reservations, Haggerty had to go through with it. When Tom accuses her of living in a fantasy, Angela slips into her other personality and shows him photographs of her and Haggerty together. One, a companion to the beach photo Tom saw earlier, shows Haggerty’s face. Angela tells him it was taken in Bimini, during a drug run. Later, Angela’s priest, Father Mancini, telephones Tom and invites him to the correctional facility to talk to Felix, who has lost hope and stopped eating. Tom assures the young man he will fight for his freedom. Later, he finds Angela in a diner, her face bruised. She says Haggerty came to her apartment, beat her, and searched for his old love letters. When Tom takes her home, Angela’s place is torn up, but she does not want Tom to hurt Haggerty. He returns to the mill, where Jerry says Judge Murdoch asked for an affidavit saying he killed Dr. Daniels. Tom convinces Jerry it would be a good idea, because the judge would defend him by showing that Daniels was a dangerous drug dealer. Then Jerry could complete his church with a free conscience. Jerry confesses that the only reason Dr. Daniels let him enter the house was that Angela accompanied him, and she was the only one the doctor trusted. They agree to drive separately to the judge’s house, Tom in his car and Jerry on his motorcycle, but on the way, Jerry has a religious vision and drives into the grill of an oncoming truck, killing himself. Later, Tom tells Angela he knows the truth about her being present when Jerry murdered Dr. Daniels, and that her testimony could free Felix. Angela, however, is not sure whether she was there or the murder was a dream. Tom convinces her to at least talk to Judge Murdoch. He sets up a meeting at the judge’s estate, and drops her off in his care. The next day, when Tom returns to Murdoch’s, the judge says that with Jerry dead, everything is under control. He is having lunch tomorrow with Judge Lubronsky, Felix is out on bail, and a new trial will exonerate him, so “that’s the end of it.” As Tom leaves, Angela gestures him into a nearby cottage to congratulate him on freeing Felix. When Judge Murdoch knocks on the door, Angela pushes Tom out the rear entrance, and as he looks back in, the judge and Angela kiss. Caterers and townspeople, including Felix and Haggerty, enter the estate to celebrate Felix’s release. Felix thanks Tom for his help, and Haggerty suggests he stay for a few drinks. Instead, Tom walks away.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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