Homer and Eddie (1989)

R | 100 mins | Comedy-drama | 9 February 1989

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HISTORY

Richard Pryor was originally set to star as “Eddie Cervi,” according to the 27 Jan 1988 LAT. The part had to be rewritten for Whoopi Goldberg.
       Principal photography began 25 Jan 1988, the 8 Mar 1988 HR noted. The 27 Jan 1988 LAT reported that the production was filming in the Mojave Desert. The Oregon Film Commission speculated in the 29 Jan 1988 HR that Homer and Eddie was set to spend two or three weeks in Oregon and add $50,000 a day to the local economy. Among Oregon locations were Mount Hood and Oregon City, where the production was set to use 1,000 extras for a parade on Seventh Street. The 12 Aug 1988 DV noted that filming also took place in Beatty, NV, north of Las Vegas. Actress Anne Ramsey died three months after production wrapped.
       Homer and Eddie premiered at the San Sebastian Film Festival on 16 Sep 1989, the DV reported three days later, but despite sharing the festival’s top award, the film was in limbo because its initial distributor, Cineplex Odeon Films, ceased its “theatrical release program” before the film’s scheduled Apr 1989 opening. Skouras Pictures, Inc., acquired theatrical rights to Homer and Eddie on 28 Sep 1989, the 19 Dec 1990 DV reported. According to the 25 Dec 1989 Seattle Times, the film debuted that week in Seattle, WA.
       Homer and Eddie received mixed reviews and did poorly at the box office. Producer Kings Road Entertainment eventually sued Skouras for $141,400, claiming the company did not provide ... More Less

Richard Pryor was originally set to star as “Eddie Cervi,” according to the 27 Jan 1988 LAT. The part had to be rewritten for Whoopi Goldberg.
       Principal photography began 25 Jan 1988, the 8 Mar 1988 HR noted. The 27 Jan 1988 LAT reported that the production was filming in the Mojave Desert. The Oregon Film Commission speculated in the 29 Jan 1988 HR that Homer and Eddie was set to spend two or three weeks in Oregon and add $50,000 a day to the local economy. Among Oregon locations were Mount Hood and Oregon City, where the production was set to use 1,000 extras for a parade on Seventh Street. The 12 Aug 1988 DV noted that filming also took place in Beatty, NV, north of Las Vegas. Actress Anne Ramsey died three months after production wrapped.
       Homer and Eddie premiered at the San Sebastian Film Festival on 16 Sep 1989, the DV reported three days later, but despite sharing the festival’s top award, the film was in limbo because its initial distributor, Cineplex Odeon Films, ceased its “theatrical release program” before the film’s scheduled Apr 1989 opening. Skouras Pictures, Inc., acquired theatrical rights to Homer and Eddie on 28 Sep 1989, the 19 Dec 1990 DV reported. According to the 25 Dec 1989 Seattle Times, the film debuted that week in Seattle, WA.
       Homer and Eddie received mixed reviews and did poorly at the box office. Producer Kings Road Entertainment eventually sued Skouras for $141,400, claiming the company did not provide a monthly accounting or allow an audit of its books. The producer agreed to drop its suit in exchange for payment and an audit of the film’s receipts.
       End credits contain the following acknowledgments: “The producers wish to express their appreciation to Alan Goland; Dr. James, D.D.S.; Adidas; California Angels; Creative Film Promotions; JDH Sound and Bruce Markoe; Nearly Normal Enterprises; Norm Marshall & Associates, Inc.; Oakland Athletics; Pacific Trails; Pepsi-Cola Company; Rogers & Cowan, Inc.; Unique Product Placement; The State of Oregon; Oregon Governor Neil Goldschmidt; The City of Orgeon City, Oregon; The County of Clackamas, Oregon; Oregon Department of Transportation; The State of California.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Mar 1990.
---
Chicago Sun-Times
13 Aug 1988.
News, p. 42
Daily Variety
15 Jan 1988
p. 3
Daily Variety
2 Feb 1988
p. 17
Daily Variety
20 Jun 1988
p. 70
Daily Variety
12 Aug 1988
p. 16
Daily Variety
19 Sep 1989
p. 2, 20
Daily Variety
19 Dec 1990
p. 5, 28
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jan 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Mar 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 May 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Feb 1990.
---
Los Angeles Times
27 Jan 1988
Section Q, p. 1
Los Angeles Times
9 Feb 1990
Calendar, p. 8
New York Times
9 Feb 1990
p. 14.
Orange County Register
21 Sep 1989
Section K, p. 4
Seattle Times
25 Dec 1989
Section G, p. 7
The Oregonian
2 Mar 1990.
---
Variety
4 Oct 1989
pp. 37-38
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Kings Road Entertainment Presents
A Borman/Cady Production
An Andrei Konchalovsky Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d 2d asst dir (Oregon)
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
2d unit dir of photog & addl photog
Visual consultant
2d unit, 1st asst cam
2d unit, 1st asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Elec lighting tech
Elec lighting tech
Elec lighting tech
Lamp op
Key grip
Best boy grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Video assist
Cam equip by
Cranes and dollys by
24 frame video by
Video facilities
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Post prod supv
Asst ed
Asst ed
2d asst ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Const coord
Prop master gang boss
Prod painter
Lead scenic artist
Lead man
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
COSTUMES
Cost dept supv
Ward asst
MUSIC
Mus supv
Orig mus
Synthesizer programming and rec eng
Exec mus prod for Apache Records
Mus coord for Apache Records
Mus coord for Sound of Film, Ltd.
Score pub by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Asst sd ed
Dial ed
Asst dial ed
Foley ed
Sd supv - U.S.
ADR supv - U.S.
ADR ed - U.S.
ADR ed - U.S.
Asst ed - U.S.
Apprentice ed - U.S.
Supv re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Rec facilities
Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff gang boss
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hair stylist
James Belushi's hair des by
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod coord
Prod secy
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Loc mgr (Los Angeles)
Asst loc mgr (Oregon)
Casting assoc
Extras casting (Los Angeles)
Grey Images
Extras casting (Los Angeles)
Extras casting asst (Los Angeles)
Extras casting (Oregon)
Kalles Casting
Extras casting (Oregon)
Extras casting asst (Oregon)
Asst to Andrei Konchalovsky
Asst to Whoopi Goldberg
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
First aid
Craftservice
Studio teacher
Projectionist
Animals by
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Mechanic
Picture car consultant
Picture car consultant
Catering by
Payroll services by
Outdoor advertising consultant
Outdoor advertising consultant
Hair care billboard courtesy of
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Whoopi Goldberg's stand-in
James Belush's stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Down Home Jubilee,” performed by Susi Beatty, written by Dennis Morgan, Spady Brannan, Susi Beatty, produced by David Malloy, courtesy of Little Shop of Morgansongs, Spady Music SGE, Ltd
“Home,” performed by Richie Havens, written by Mike Piccirillo, produced by Mike Piccirillo, courtesy of BMG Screen Music Mike Piccirillo
“Night Is The Hunter,” performed by John Brannen, written by John Brannen, Bob Jones, Tom Gray, produced by David Malloy, courtesy of Beatty Wills Music, Gray Matter Publishing, Co
+
SONGS
“Down Home Jubilee,” performed by Susi Beatty, written by Dennis Morgan, Spady Brannan, Susi Beatty, produced by David Malloy, courtesy of Little Shop of Morgansongs, Spady Music SGE, Ltd
“Home,” performed by Richie Havens, written by Mike Piccirillo, produced by Mike Piccirillo, courtesy of BMG Screen Music Mike Piccirillo
“Night Is The Hunter,” performed by John Brannen, written by John Brannen, Bob Jones, Tom Gray, produced by David Malloy, courtesy of Beatty Wills Music, Gray Matter Publishing, Co
“How Far Can You Go,” performed by Billy Burnette, written by Billy Burnette, David Malloy, produced by David Malloy, courtesy of Billy Beau Music, Rare Blue Music, David Malloy Music, Irving Music
“Livin’ In The Jungle,” performed by Richie Havens, written by Mike Piccirillo, produced by Mike Piccirillo, courtesy of Screen Music Mike Piccirillo
“Bad Seed,” performed by Richie Havens, written by John Brannen, Jack Tempchin, produced by David Malloy, courtesy of Beatty Wills Music, Night River Music
“Jesus Scared The Hell Out Of Me,” performed by Simone Stokes, written by Simon Stokes, Harry Garfield, produced by Simone Stokes, Chris Pinnick, courtesy of Big Screen Music, Scoundrel Music, Coop Music, Little Indian Music
“You Came Into My Life,” performed by Terry Wood, written by Mike Piccirillo, produced by Mike Piccirillo, courtesy of Big Screen Music Mike Piccirillo
“Sweet Emotions Of Love,” performed by Beau Williams, written by Mike Piccirillo, produced by Mike Piccirillo, courtesy of Big Screen Music, Mike Piccirillo
“Comin’ Down With Love,” performed by Mike & The Realistics, written by Mike Piccirillo, produced by Mike Piccirillo, courtesy of Big Screen Music Mike Piccirillo
“The Wild One,” performed by John Brannen, written by John Brannen, Danny Tate, Tom Gray, produced by David Malloy, courtesy of Beatty Wills Music, John Danile Music, Asckee Music, Gray Matter Publishing, Co.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
9 February 1989
Premiere Information:
Seattle, WA opening: late December 1989
Los Angeles and New York openings: 9 February 1990
Production Date:
25 January--early May 1988
Copyright Claimant:
Kings Road Entertainment, Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 May 1989
Copyright Number:
PAU1314932
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded in Ultra-Stereo®
Color
Film by Eastman Kodak
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
100
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In a tiny Arizona town, slow-witted Homer Lanza packs his suitcase, tries on several hats before deciding upon a hunting cap, and hitchhikes on a deserted road. Two men in a car rob him of $87, drive off with his suitcase, and dump it farther up the road. Stopping at a convenience store, Homer steals several candy bars, and even though the proprietress catches him, she takes pity and lets him have them. Homer promises to send her $3 as soon as he gets to Oregon. That night, he climbs into the back of an old Lincoln automobile sitting in a junk yard, and in the morning is surprised to find that the front seat is occupied by Edwina “Eddie” Cervi, a young African American woman. When Homer apologizes and tells her he thought her car was a “wreck,” Eddie becomes enraged and slams Homer’s head against the car door. Homer lies half delirious on the ground as she riffles through his suitcase. Homer tells her he had $87 to get to Oregon, where his father is dying in a hospital, but two men in a red Ford stole it. Eddie agrees to let him tag along, in order to point the men out, so he can get the money back. As they talk, Eddie realizes Homer is not very smart. He tells her he was hit in the head with a baseball when he was a boy. They discover they have both worked as dishwashers. Feeling sorry for banging Homer’s head against the car, Eddie buys him breakfast, but her constant use of profanity angers another customer. Eddie attacks the customer, and as Homer tries to pull her ... +


In a tiny Arizona town, slow-witted Homer Lanza packs his suitcase, tries on several hats before deciding upon a hunting cap, and hitchhikes on a deserted road. Two men in a car rob him of $87, drive off with his suitcase, and dump it farther up the road. Stopping at a convenience store, Homer steals several candy bars, and even though the proprietress catches him, she takes pity and lets him have them. Homer promises to send her $3 as soon as he gets to Oregon. That night, he climbs into the back of an old Lincoln automobile sitting in a junk yard, and in the morning is surprised to find that the front seat is occupied by Edwina “Eddie” Cervi, a young African American woman. When Homer apologizes and tells her he thought her car was a “wreck,” Eddie becomes enraged and slams Homer’s head against the car door. Homer lies half delirious on the ground as she riffles through his suitcase. Homer tells her he had $87 to get to Oregon, where his father is dying in a hospital, but two men in a red Ford stole it. Eddie agrees to let him tag along, in order to point the men out, so he can get the money back. As they talk, Eddie realizes Homer is not very smart. He tells her he was hit in the head with a baseball when he was a boy. They discover they have both worked as dishwashers. Feeling sorry for banging Homer’s head against the car, Eddie buys him breakfast, but her constant use of profanity angers another customer. Eddie attacks the customer, and as Homer tries to pull her away, she hits him. When the cashier discovers that Eddie’s credit card is stolen, she and Homer make a dash for her car and drive away. Homer asks Eddie why she hit him, despite their friendship, and Eddie replies that she is not his friend. They arrive in Nevada and stop at a roadside restroom. As a military jet flies over, Eddie hallucinates and mutters. Eddie becomes hysterical when Homer offers her a spare toothbrush, exclaiming that there are worse things to worry about than plaque on her teeth. Homer grips her in a bear hug until she calms down. Back on the road, Homer brags about his prowess as a great boxer and lover, but Eddie bets he has never been “laid.” She drives Homer to a roadside brothel, where her cousin, Esther, works, and asks Esther, an obese black woman, to “take care” of Homer. Asked to pay $30, Eddie tells Esther and her partner, Belle, she will return with the money. Eddie robs a nearby convenience store and shoots the cashier in the shoulder when she thinks he is going to grab a gun. Meanwhile, after Esther takes care of Homer, she warns him that Eddie is “no good.” Eddie returns, pays $30, and rushes Homer to the car. That night they stay in a cheap motel. Watching an evangelist on television, they argue about religion. Eddie blasphemes, and Homer tries to stop her in order to prevent God from striking them down. After Eddie suffers another “episode,” she admits she has a “walnut-sized” tumor in her brain and not much time to live. She has pills, but never takes them because they turn her into a “zombie.” Homer and Eddie clutch hands and fall asleep. The next morning, snow is on the ground and Eddie pelts Homer with snowballs. He claims he is afraid to drive because he had an accident while racing in the “Indianapolis 500,” but she makes him get behind the wheel, then stomps on his foot to spin the car on the snowy highway. Later, Eddie sees a red Ford at a roadside produce store. Homer is certain it is not the Ford of the men who robbed him, but Eddie waits nearby with her gun. When a young couple comes out of the store, Homer warns them not to go to their car, but they ignore him. Eddie robs the man. Later, Eddie puts a stolen California license plate on the Lincoln. As they change a flat tire, Homer says his parents sent him to a special hospital back east when he was still a boy, and he rarely saw them as he grew up. Eddie was raised in Oakland, California. She never knew her father and has not seen her mother in ten years. When they arrive in Oakland, Homer is intimidated by the chaos and loud black people on the street. Eddie takes him to a bar, where she asks patron Maggie Sinclair where she can find her mother. Maggie directs her to a local cemetery. Eddie finds her mother sitting next to a tombstone, engraved with her name “Linda Cirvi.” Also engraved is the date of her hoped-for death, June 18, 1989, which Linda declares is a good day because June 18 is also her birthday. Eddie tells her mother she broke out of the hospital because the doctors cured her tumors. Linda orders her daughter to leave, but Eddie rests her head on her mother’s shoulder and wants to talk. Linda becomes angry and chases her off. Homer promises Linda he will look after Eddie for her. The following day, Eddie complains that trouble has followed her since she was a child, and reminds Homer that she is a fugitive from a mental hospital. To cheer her up, Homer makes faces, lifts her in his arms, and dances with her. That night, at a gas station, a cashier catches her shoplifting, and she shoots him. Seeing the man lying on the floor, Homer tells Eddie he does not want to go any farther with her. Eddie replies that he has to stay because he promised her mother he would take care of her. Also, he is her best friend and she does not want to lose him. When Homer insists that Eddie ask God for forgiveness, they stop at a Catholic Church and Eddie writes down a list of sins. When she confesses to a priest that she has killed three people in her life, he asks her to turn herself in, but Eddie refuses to go back to “the loony bin.” She and Homer arrive in Oregon City, Oregon, where she thinks she sees Jesus Christ walking around a corner carrying a cross. Homer directs her to the large, upper-middle-class Lanza house. Nobody is home, so Eddie breaks a window in the door. Homer runs upstairs to his bedroom, but there is no sign that a boy ever lived there. The family maid returns home with groceries, sees Eddie at the piano, and telephones police. Homer comes downstairs and convinces the maid that he is the owners’ son by showing her an old family photograph. The maid tells him his father died two days before, and his mother is at his wake at the funeral home. Homer drops to the floor and sits dumbstruck, until Eddie and the maid help him to his feet. As Eddie drives Homer to the funeral home, they are slowed by a parade. Again, Eddie sees Jesus walk out of sight around a corner carrying a cross. Homer enters the funeral home, walks past his mother, and stands at his father’s casket. He asks his father to forgive him for being late, but acknowledges that his parents probably did not want to see him. Homer confesses that the baseball hit him while he was looking for his father in the stands. Mrs. Lanza, ashamed to see her retarded son, asks him to spend the night at the house and begs him not to hate her. Homer turns down the offer because she does not really want him. Outside, Homer is recognized by a local policeman, Tommy Dearly, who recalls playing on the opposing team on the day he was hit by the baseball. At a party that evening, Homer introduces Eddie to a couple of old friends, including Jesse, whose family owns a restaurant. Jesse hires Homer as dishwasher. Homer wants to get Eddie a job, too, but she slips away. Eddie gives all her money and Homer’s suitcase to a policeman and asks him to give it to Homer, then drives away. A block or two away, she stops at a store for aspirin, but has no money. Searching her pockets, she inadvertently shows her gun. The cashier insists on emptying his cash register and giving her money, even though she did not ask for it. When Eddie turns around, he pulls a gun and shoots her. She stumbles outside as Homer runs toward her. He sits on the curb with her. A man dressed as Jesus, wearing a crown of thorns and carrying a cross, walks by and looks down at them. Eddie drops her head and dies. Homer tells her, “I’m sorry,” over and over.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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