Internal Affairs (1990)

R | 115 mins | Drama | 12 January 1990

Director:

Mike Figgis

Writer:

Henry Bean

Producer:

Frank Mancuso, Jr.

Cinematographer:

John Alonzo

Editor:

Robert Estrin

Production Designer:

Waldemar Kalinowski

Production Company:

Out of Town Films
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HISTORY

The 12 Apr 1989 Var reported that principal photography began 3 Apr 1989 in Los Angeles, CA. According to the 22 Nov 1989 Var, Canadian executive producers Pierre David and René Malo estimated that the budget was $15 million Canadian. Star Richard Gere, a pacifist and Buddhist, was quoted in the 4 Jan 1990 issue of The Gazette (Montreal, Canada), saying that the original screenplay was much bloodier than the final film because he “proposed” that the story rely less on violence and more on his character’s “psychological manipulation.”
       According to the 15 May 1989 and 30 May 1989 editions of DV, the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (I.A.T.S.E.) pulled the camera crew off the set twice in two weeks because Out of Town Films failed to sign a union contract. The problems began 2 May 1989 when the Teamsters Local 399 complained that non-union drivers were receiving substandard pay. The following day, I.A.T.S.E. pulled Camera Local 659’s eight-man crew off the set. I.A.T.S.E. eventually resolved its problems with the production, but Teamsters continued picketing Out of Town Film’s offices at Raleigh Studios in Hollywood. The 27 Jun 1990 Var reported that Teamsters complained to the trustees of the Motion Picture Industry Pension & Health Plan that Paramount Pictures, distributor of Internal Affairs, had created the non-union Out of Town Films as a “sham” company to circumvent union contracts. Paramount and the production company claimed the deal was “strictly a finance-distribution arrangement” allowed by the I.A.T.S.E. contract and the Teamsters’ Act. The allegations were eventually dropped
       The 12 May 1989 LAHExam noted that Richard ... More Less

The 12 Apr 1989 Var reported that principal photography began 3 Apr 1989 in Los Angeles, CA. According to the 22 Nov 1989 Var, Canadian executive producers Pierre David and René Malo estimated that the budget was $15 million Canadian. Star Richard Gere, a pacifist and Buddhist, was quoted in the 4 Jan 1990 issue of The Gazette (Montreal, Canada), saying that the original screenplay was much bloodier than the final film because he “proposed” that the story rely less on violence and more on his character’s “psychological manipulation.”
       According to the 15 May 1989 and 30 May 1989 editions of DV, the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (I.A.T.S.E.) pulled the camera crew off the set twice in two weeks because Out of Town Films failed to sign a union contract. The problems began 2 May 1989 when the Teamsters Local 399 complained that non-union drivers were receiving substandard pay. The following day, I.A.T.S.E. pulled Camera Local 659’s eight-man crew off the set. I.A.T.S.E. eventually resolved its problems with the production, but Teamsters continued picketing Out of Town Film’s offices at Raleigh Studios in Hollywood. The 27 Jun 1990 Var reported that Teamsters complained to the trustees of the Motion Picture Industry Pension & Health Plan that Paramount Pictures, distributor of Internal Affairs, had created the non-union Out of Town Films as a “sham” company to circumvent union contracts. Paramount and the production company claimed the deal was “strictly a finance-distribution arrangement” allowed by the I.A.T.S.E. contract and the Teamsters’ Act. The allegations were eventually dropped
       The 12 May 1989 LAHExam noted that Richard Gere and Nancy Travis’s “steamy love scenes” were filmed 10 May 1989 in a twelfth-floor suite of the Roosevelt Hotel in Hollywood.
       The 4 Jan 1990 HR reported that Internal Affairs would open 12 Jan 1990 on 900 screens. It received mixed reviews.
       End credits contain the following acknowledgment: “The producers wish to thank: video displays by Video Image.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Mar 1990.
---
Daily Variety
15 May 1989
p. 1, 6
Daily Variety
30 May 1989
p. 1, 18
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jan 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jan 1990
p. 4, 47
LAHExam
12 May 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
12 Jan 1990
Section F, p. 12
New York Times
12 Jan 1990
p. 10
The Gazette (Montreal)
4 Jan 1990
Section F, p. 2
Variety
12 Apr 1989
p, 32
Variety
8 Nov 1989
p. 70
Variety
22 Nov 1989
p. 46
Variety
17 Jan 1990
p. 26
Variety
27 Jun 1990
p. 30
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures presents
a Frank Mancuso, Jr. production in association with Pierre David
a Mike Figgis film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Unit prod mgr, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Co-exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
Video art by
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
1st company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Dir of photo, 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Art dept coord
Story board illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Addl ed by
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Scenic artist
Set dresser
Set dresser
Lead person
Lead person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Asst propmaster
Const coord
Lead carpenter
Lead carpenter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst to cost des
Cost supv
Costumer
MUSIC
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Mus rec consultant
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Cableperson
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
ADR group coord
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Titles and opt eff
Title des
MAKEUP
Make-up artist
Asst make-up artist
Make-up eff
Hairstylist
Asst hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod supv
Scr supv
Exec asst to Frank Mancuso, Jr.
Asst to Mike Figgis
Casting asst
First aid
Prod coord
Prod secy
Asst to Pierre David
Prod auditor
Asst auditor
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Aquamarine," written and performed by Scott Reeder
"Anazia's Dance," written & performed by Ray Obiedo, courtesy of Windham Hill Productions, Inc.
"Keep On Pushin'," by Humberto Lopez & Reginald Barrett, performed by Humberto Lopez, Reginald Barrett & Patricia Brown
+
SONGS
"Aquamarine," written and performed by Scott Reeder
"Anazia's Dance," written & performed by Ray Obiedo, courtesy of Windham Hill Productions, Inc.
"Keep On Pushin'," by Humberto Lopez & Reginald Barrett, performed by Humberto Lopez, Reginald Barrett & Patricia Brown
"Cartoon Rock," by Winston Sharples
"Lo Que Me Gusta De Ti," by Hugo Molinares, performed by Fernando Lavoy, courtesy of Don Mateo Records.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 January 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 12 Jan 1990
Production Date:
3 Apr--Jun 1989
Copyright Claimant:
Out of Town Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
14 March 1990
Copyright Number:
PA455289
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed With Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
115
Length(in feet):
10,338
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29892
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) officer Dorian Fletcher shoots an unarmed man during a drug raid. When fellow officer Dennis Peck places a knife in the victim’s hand, Fletcher is relieved, but also shocked by Peck’s illegal behavior. Meanwhile, in the LAPD Internal Affairs Division (IAD), Chief Healy welcomes Raymond “Ray” Avilla to the unit and introduces him to Amy Wallace, his new partner and training officer. Amy is investigating a complaint that Van Stretch, an officer who trained with Ray at the police academy, planted drugs in a suspect’s car. Meanwhile, Van Stretch accuses his wife, Penny, of cheating and hits her. Dennis Peck, who is Stretch's partner, arrives at their house, pulls Stretch outside, and insists that he pull himself together. Later, in the police locker room, Peck arranges for fellow officers to “moonlight” as security guards at a shopping mall. When Ray Avilla and Amy Wallace visit division headquarters, Stretch is happy to see his academy buddy, until Peck warns him that Ray is working for Internal Affairs and has come to interrogate him. Amy informs Stretch that the man he arrested has admitted owning the cocaine found in his pocket, but it does not match the bag of cocaine Stretch found in his car. Ray suspects that Stretch is doing drugs, but Stretch denies it. They set another appointment for the following week. Ray Avilla attends a party at a video arts gallery where his wife, Kathleen, works, but feels uneasy with the well-heeled and artistic crowd. Kathleen appears equally uneasy as she asks Ray about his new female partner. Elsewhere, Peck invites Stretch to stay in a guest room at the house he shares ... +


Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) officer Dorian Fletcher shoots an unarmed man during a drug raid. When fellow officer Dennis Peck places a knife in the victim’s hand, Fletcher is relieved, but also shocked by Peck’s illegal behavior. Meanwhile, in the LAPD Internal Affairs Division (IAD), Chief Healy welcomes Raymond “Ray” Avilla to the unit and introduces him to Amy Wallace, his new partner and training officer. Amy is investigating a complaint that Van Stretch, an officer who trained with Ray at the police academy, planted drugs in a suspect’s car. Meanwhile, Van Stretch accuses his wife, Penny, of cheating and hits her. Dennis Peck, who is Stretch's partner, arrives at their house, pulls Stretch outside, and insists that he pull himself together. Later, in the police locker room, Peck arranges for fellow officers to “moonlight” as security guards at a shopping mall. When Ray Avilla and Amy Wallace visit division headquarters, Stretch is happy to see his academy buddy, until Peck warns him that Ray is working for Internal Affairs and has come to interrogate him. Amy informs Stretch that the man he arrested has admitted owning the cocaine found in his pocket, but it does not match the bag of cocaine Stretch found in his car. Ray suspects that Stretch is doing drugs, but Stretch denies it. They set another appointment for the following week. Ray Avilla attends a party at a video arts gallery where his wife, Kathleen, works, but feels uneasy with the well-heeled and artistic crowd. Kathleen appears equally uneasy as she asks Ray about his new female partner. Elsewhere, Peck invites Stretch to stay in a guest room at the house he shares with his fourth wife, Heather, and several kids. The following day, Ray and Amy visit the bank where Penny Stretch works as a loan officer. When they mention her bruised eye, Penny admits her husband struck her while he was drinking, but accuses Ray of trying to "nail" him to enhance his own career in IAD. Ray asks if she is seeing another man, and Penny orders them out of her office. In the parking lot, Ray notices Amy Wallace admiring a sexy woman walking by. As Penny leaves the bank in a Mercedes-Benz convertible, Amy mentions that the policeman’s wife was also wearing an expensive Rolex watch. Meanwhile, Peck interferes with Dorian Fletcher arresting a prostitute. Claiming the woman is his informant, Peck reminds Dorian he got him an outside security job to make extra money. As he scuffles with Dorian and releases the prostitute, two nearby policemen take note. Amy and Ray report to their boss, Lieutenant Grieb, that Stretch has a drug problem, and Grieb gives them three days to make their case. When Ray wonders why a veteran, decorated policeman like Peck is still in uniform and not a detective, Grieb defends him as a great cop who prefers the streets. Later, at a hamburger shack, Ray asks Peck if Penny might be his partner’s problem, but Peck advises Ray to "stay away from wives." When Ray asks if Peck follows his own advice, the cop answers that all wives look outside marriage for sex, just like men do. Meanwhile, Amy Wallace discovers that, in addition to Stretch’s policeman’s pay and his wife’s salary, he makes money moonlighting as a security guard at the mall, but even with three incomes, the Stretches could not afford their suburban house and expensive cars. Elsewhere, Peck visits Rudy Mohr, head of mall security, to suggest a new officer who needs work. Mohr responds that Peck’s cops are unreliable and taking drugs. Giving Peck an envelope, Mohr suggests he talk to Steven and Tova Arrocas about a new assignment. Ray Avilla interviews Dorian Fletcher about his scuffle with Peck, but Dorian claims he let the prostitute go only because he made an improper arrest. He does admit that Peck got him the mall security job. Ray initiates an investigation into Peck's position as “paid consultant” for ex-convict Rudy Mohr at the mall. Searching through employee records, Ray and Amy discover that Peck found moonlighting jobs for at least forty percent of the cops in his division. Meanwhile, Peck meets Steven and Tova Arrocas at a restaurant. Steven Arrocas hires Peck to kill his parents, whose old-style business practices are destroying the company he hopes to inherit. As Peck discusses terms with Steven, he strokes Tova Arrocas’s thigh under the table. The next day, Ray and Amy report to Lt. Grieb and Captain Riordon that Peck is in business with a felon and has too much financial influence over other officers. Grieb gets angry at their attack on a “good cop,” and Riordan insists they need more evidence for a complaint. Later, Ray and Amy inform Stretch they have evidence of a “pattern of illegal activity” and demand he confess and testify against Peck or face indictment. Stretch’s lawyer turns down their offer. When Stretch tells his partner what happened, Peck searches him for a hidden microphone and explains why they have to stick together. Later, Peck approaches Ray Avilla outside the City Building and talks about working hard to support his eight children and four wives. Sowing seeds of doubt, Peck confesses to having an affair with Ray’s wife, Kathleen. Ray hits him and hurries to talk to Kathleen, who complains that his new work schedule has wrecked their sex life. Elsewhere, as Penny is having sex with Peck, her husband telephones and admits he is thinking about confessing to IAD. Peck arranges his partner’s murder that night. As Stretch checks on an abandoned vehicle, he is wounded by a shotgun blast. When the would-be killer steps outside the vehicle to join Peck, the cop shoots him in the head, then notifies headquarters. Demetrio, a second man in the vehicle, slips into the driver's seat and escapes. Van is still alive, but as police and an ambulance approach, Peck asphyxiates him. When Amy and Ray arrive at the scene, they realize Peck arranged the killing. Ray visits “Cousin Gregory” at a Latino nightclub and asks him to spread the word he is looking for a Latino driver involved in Stretch’s killing. Hoping to get Dorian Fletcher’s cooperation, Ray arranges for him to be assigned to the case as a plainclothes detective. Cousin Gregory informs Ray that Demetrio, the man he wants, will be making a drug deal tomorrow. Meanwhile, Peck’s wife, Heather, sees on television that an old couple has been murdered execution style. She connects the name Arrocas to a note her husband made on a pad. The next day, Ray, Amy, and Dorian lay in wait for Demetrio, but a SWAT team arrives unexpectedly and sets off a shootout. Dorian Fletcher and Demetrio are killed, but before he dies, Demetrio tells Ray that Peck hired his partner to kill Stretch. Following Peck, Ray sees him meet his wife, Kathleen Avilla, at a coffee shop. Kathleen is innocent, but Peck, realizing her husband is following him, makes touching gestures to create the impression they are having an affair. He explains to Kathleen that he is worried about her husband’s behavior. Later, in a City Building elevator, Peck blindsides Ray, knocks him down, and brags about having sex with his wife. Ray hurries to the gallery, where Kathleen is hosting a party for donors. He confronts her in front of everyone, knocks her down, and storms out. After drinking himself into a stupor at Cousin Gregory’s club, he stumbles home in the morning to pack his clothes. Kathleen pleads her innocence and tells Ray that Peck set them both up. They make love. Amy, meanwhile, discovers that Peck’s four wives own several million dollars’ worth of real estate, and that Penny wrote the mortgages. Threatening Penny with money laundering, tax evasion, and fraud, Ray and Amy offer immunity if she testifies against Peck, but Penny insists the mortgages are legal. Peck asks his wife, Heather, if police have contacted her about their real estate holdings and warns her to say nothing. Later, Peck hears his previous wife crying to Heather that she is being investigated. Realizing his scheme is unraveling, Peck drives to the Arrocas mansion and shoots the husband and wife. Elsewhere, Heather meets Ray and Amy to make a deal to save her kids and her home. Heather also admits that her husband was involved in a contract killing. Ray and Amy go to the Arrocas home and find Steven and Tova dead, but Peck shoots Amy before escaping. Ray accompanies her to the hospital. Sitting in the waiting room, he realizes Peck will go after Kathleen. Ray speeds home and gets the jump on Peck before he can hurt Kathleen. Peck attacks Ray with a knife, accusing the Internal Affairs officer of being a “selfish Yuppie” who does not appreciate what it takes to support eight children. Ray shoots him dead. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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