Clean and Sober (1988)

R | 124 mins | Drama | 10 August 1988

Director:

Glenn Gordon Caron

Writer:

Tod Carroll

Producers:

Tony Ganz, Deborah Blum

Cinematographer:

Jan Kiesser

Editor:

Richard Chew

Production Designer:

Joel Schiller

Production Company:

Imagine Entertainment
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HISTORY

According to a 5 Oct 1988 LAT article, Tom Hanks was originally cast as “Daryl Poynter,” but dropped out early in development. As reported in the 9 Aug 1988 LAT, first-time feature film director Glenn Gordon Caron then approached actor Michael Keaton based on his debut performance in Imagine Entertainment’s Night Shift (1982, see entry). The choice was met with skepticism from Warner Bros. executives and Keaton, who was then only known to audiences as a comedic actor. Believing the character too unlikeable, Keaton initially turned down the project, but later decided that making a “risky” move was right for his career. A 23 Jul 1987 LAT article indicated that Meg Ryan was cast opposite Keaton in the role of a recovering alcoholic, but she does not appear in the final film.
       Although a 7 Aug 1987 Var item suggested that production was expected to take place in New Jersey, the 2 Oct 1987 Var stated that principal photography began 18 Sep 1987, with locations in Los Angeles, CA, and Philadelphia, PA. According to a story in the 16 Sep 1987 issue of Focus, production was housed at the Holiday Inn Center City in Philadelphia’s central business district.
       An 11 Aug 1988 LAT article stated that Glenn Gordon Caron’s first cut was 145 minutes in duration. The director, who was well known for “profligacy” on his television series, Moonlighting (ABC, 3 Mar 1985—14 May 1989), was forced to edit the film to a more commercial length under pressure from Warner Bros. chairman Bob Daley.
       While several critics still objected ... More Less

According to a 5 Oct 1988 LAT article, Tom Hanks was originally cast as “Daryl Poynter,” but dropped out early in development. As reported in the 9 Aug 1988 LAT, first-time feature film director Glenn Gordon Caron then approached actor Michael Keaton based on his debut performance in Imagine Entertainment’s Night Shift (1982, see entry). The choice was met with skepticism from Warner Bros. executives and Keaton, who was then only known to audiences as a comedic actor. Believing the character too unlikeable, Keaton initially turned down the project, but later decided that making a “risky” move was right for his career. A 23 Jul 1987 LAT article indicated that Meg Ryan was cast opposite Keaton in the role of a recovering alcoholic, but she does not appear in the final film.
       Although a 7 Aug 1987 Var item suggested that production was expected to take place in New Jersey, the 2 Oct 1987 Var stated that principal photography began 18 Sep 1987, with locations in Los Angeles, CA, and Philadelphia, PA. According to a story in the 16 Sep 1987 issue of Focus, production was housed at the Holiday Inn Center City in Philadelphia’s central business district.
       An 11 Aug 1988 LAT article stated that Glenn Gordon Caron’s first cut was 145 minutes in duration. The director, who was well known for “profligacy” on his television series, Moonlighting (ABC, 3 Mar 1985—14 May 1989), was forced to edit the film to a more commercial length under pressure from Warner Bros. chairman Bob Daley.
       While several critics still objected to the final 124-minute running time, Michael Keaton and Kathy Baker were consistently praised for their performances.
       According to the 17 Aug 1988 LAT, the film took in $2.2 million from 675 theaters its opening weekend.
       End credits include “Special Thanks” to: “The States of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware; The Philadelphia Film Office, Office of the City Representative; Archives of ‘76 for The First Thanksgiving Painting by J. L. G. Ferris; Riverhouse Drug Rehabilitation Clinic, Philadelphia.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Focus (Philadelphia)
16 Sep 1987
p. 84.
Los Angeles Times
23 Jul 1987
Section E, p. 1, 8.
Los Angeles Times
9 Aug 1988
Section H, p. 1, 6.
Los Angeles Times
10 Aug 1988
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
11 Aug 1988
Section G, p 1, 8-9.
Los Angeles Times
17 Aug 1988
Section G, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
5 Oct 1988
Section H, p. 1, 3-4.
New York Times
10 Aug 1988
Section C, p. 17.
Variety
7 Aug 1987.
---
Variety
2 Oct 1987.
---
Variety
10 Aug 1988
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. Presents
An Imagine Entertainment Production
A Glenn Gordon Caron Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Philadelphia cam op
Philadelphia cam op
Philadelphia 1st asst cam
Philadelphia 1st asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Addl lighting tech
Key grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Standby painter
Lead person
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men`s ward
Women's ward
MUSIC
Supv mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Tech adv
For the ASAP Family Treatment Program
Prod accountant
Prod secy
Philadelphia prod office coord
Asst to Mr. Caron
Asst to Mr. Caron
Asst to Mr. Ganz & Ms. Blum
Asst to Mr. Daniel
Asst to Mr. Keaton
Office asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Craft service
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt personnel
Stunt personnel
Stunt personnel
Stunt personnel
Stunt personnel
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Tighten Up," written by Billy Buttier and Archie Bell, performed by Archie Bell and The Drells, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"My Boyfriend's Back," written by Robert Feldman, Gerald Goldstein and Richard Gottehrer, performed by The Angels, courtesy of PolyGram Special Projects, a division of PolyGram Records, Inc.
"If You Wanna Be Happy," written by Frank Guida, Carmela Guida and Joseph Royster, performed by Jimmy Soul, courtesy of Frank Guida--S.P.Q.R. Record Co.
+
SONGS
"Tighten Up," written by Billy Buttier and Archie Bell, performed by Archie Bell and The Drells, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"My Boyfriend's Back," written by Robert Feldman, Gerald Goldstein and Richard Gottehrer, performed by The Angels, courtesy of PolyGram Special Projects, a division of PolyGram Records, Inc.
"If You Wanna Be Happy," written by Frank Guida, Carmela Guida and Joseph Royster, performed by Jimmy Soul, courtesy of Frank Guida--S.P.Q.R. Record Co.
"Since I Fell For You," written by Buddy Johnson, performed by Lenny Welch, courtesy of Barnaby Records, Inc.
"Come Softly To Me," written by Gary Troxel, Gretchen Christopher and Barbara Ellis, performed by The Fleetwoods, courtesy of EMI-Manhattan Records, a division of Capitol Records, Inc., under license from Capitol Special Markets
"Hello Stranger," written by Barbara Lewis, performed by Barbara Lewis, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Domino," written by Van Morrison, performed by Van Morrison, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 August 1988
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 10 Aug 1988
Production Date:
began 18 Sep 1987
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
14 September 1988
Copyright Number:
PA383400
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
124
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29282
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

One morning in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, cocaine-addicted real estate broker Daryl Poynter awakens to find that his lover, Karen Peluso, has suffered a heart attack in his bed. Police presume the infarction was drug-induced, but cannot find any illegal substances in Daryl’s home. Daryl seeks refuge with his coworker, Martin Laux, but Martin knows Daryl has embezzled $92,000 from their company’s escrow account, and turns him away. After hearing a radio advertisement for a rehabilitation program, Daryl checks himself into a clinic, hoping that the anonymity maintained in the facility will keep him safe from police. Once he completes detoxification, orderlies move him to the social rehab center to begin mandatory therapy with Craig, his assigned counselor. Over the next few days, however, Daryl frequently sneaks out of group therapy sessions, using Craig’s telephone to check the status of the funds he embezzled—most of which have been lost in a risky stock market venture. Craig eventually grows tired of Daryl’s behavior and kicks him out of the program. Hyped up, Daryl drives to his office and tears apart his desk in search of an envelope containing an emergency stash of cocaine. When the cleaning lady threatens to notify police of his intrusion, Daryl reluctantly returns to the rehab center. One evening, he accompanies the group to an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting and meets a recovering addict named Richard Dirks, who offers to be his sponsor. Later, Martin informs Daryl that Karen Peluso has died. Although Craig doubts Daryl’s desire to stay sober, he decides to allow him one free day outside the clinic. Returning to his house, Daryl telephones his usual drug dealers looking for a fix, but mistakenly calls Richard ... +


One morning in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, cocaine-addicted real estate broker Daryl Poynter awakens to find that his lover, Karen Peluso, has suffered a heart attack in his bed. Police presume the infarction was drug-induced, but cannot find any illegal substances in Daryl’s home. Daryl seeks refuge with his coworker, Martin Laux, but Martin knows Daryl has embezzled $92,000 from their company’s escrow account, and turns him away. After hearing a radio advertisement for a rehabilitation program, Daryl checks himself into a clinic, hoping that the anonymity maintained in the facility will keep him safe from police. Once he completes detoxification, orderlies move him to the social rehab center to begin mandatory therapy with Craig, his assigned counselor. Over the next few days, however, Daryl frequently sneaks out of group therapy sessions, using Craig’s telephone to check the status of the funds he embezzled—most of which have been lost in a risky stock market venture. Craig eventually grows tired of Daryl’s behavior and kicks him out of the program. Hyped up, Daryl drives to his office and tears apart his desk in search of an envelope containing an emergency stash of cocaine. When the cleaning lady threatens to notify police of his intrusion, Daryl reluctantly returns to the rehab center. One evening, he accompanies the group to an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting and meets a recovering addict named Richard Dirks, who offers to be his sponsor. Later, Martin informs Daryl that Karen Peluso has died. Although Craig doubts Daryl’s desire to stay sober, he decides to allow him one free day outside the clinic. Returning to his house, Daryl telephones his usual drug dealers looking for a fix, but mistakenly calls Richard Dirks, who suggests they meet. On the final night of the program, the “graduates” throw a party to celebrate their sobriety. Daryl dances with a steel mill worker named Charlene “Charlie” Standers and suggests they stay in touch. The next morning, Richard picks up Daryl at the clinic and purges his house of all addictive substances. Unable to readjust to life alone, Daryl drives through Charlie Standers’s neighborhood. Charlie invites him to stay for dinner, inciting an awkward encounter with her abusive boyfriend, Lenny. Daryl soon becomes preoccupied pursuing Charlie, and as the two grow closer, she reveals she once suffered a miscarriage. Wanting the best for her new life, Daryl urges her to leave Lenny, but her confidence falters, and she is unable to end the relationship. Later, Daryl goes to his boss, Kramer, and confesses his crime. Kramer and his associates fire Daryl, but promise not to report him to police so long as he repays the money. Distraught, Daryl seeks support from Charlie, who finally admits her attraction to him. After they make love, Daryl discovers a vial of cocaine in her purse. She blames Lenny for her struggle to stay sober, and decides to move in with Daryl while he searches for a new job. One night, Lenny tearfully begs Charlie’s forgiveness, and she agrees to get back together with him. However, they quickly resume fighting, and Charlie storms out. On the drive to Daryl’s house, she is fatally sideswiped by another car while reaching for cocaine. Daryl blames himself for her death, but Richard reminds him that he does not possess the power to control anyone’s addiction but his own. Sometime later, Daryl receives his thirty-day chip from Alcoholics Anonymous and admits for the first time that he is a recovering drug addict. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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