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HISTORY

The picture is a sequel to the 1985 film, Cocoon (see entry). An article in the 6 Aug 1988 LAT reported producer Richard D. Zanuck stating that after the box-office success of Cocoon, Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp. decided to exercise their legal option to film a sequel, and would do so with or without Zanuck’s involvement and Cocoon’s other producers, Lili Fini Zanuck and David Brown. The article listed the picture’s budget as $17.5 million, the same amount as 1985’s Cocoon.
       Although a 16 Mar 1987 People brief reported actor Jack Gilford saying “producers approached me about starting up shooting in May in Los Angeles and St. Petersburg, [FL],” the 29 Mar 1988 HR production chart, referring to the film by the title, Cocoon II: The Return, stated principal photography began on 21 Mar 1988 in San Francisco, CA, and Miami, FL. Production notes in AMPAS library files list additional Florida locations: Miami Seaquarium; Douglas Park, Morningside Park and Peacock Park of Miami; Rosensteil School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Coral Gables’ Miracle Mile neighborhood, Baptist Hospital, and Matheson Hammock Park and Marina; as well as No Name Harbor in Key Biscayne. Filming in Miami was completed on 3 Jun 1988, after which production “moved to ILM [Industrial Light & Magic] for the special effects work.” Though the films were made for the same of money, producer Richard D. Zanuck stated in the 6 Aug 1988 LAT that “the actors came fairly inexpensively and the effects cost a fortune” for Cocoon, while “the ... More Less

The picture is a sequel to the 1985 film, Cocoon (see entry). An article in the 6 Aug 1988 LAT reported producer Richard D. Zanuck stating that after the box-office success of Cocoon, Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp. decided to exercise their legal option to film a sequel, and would do so with or without Zanuck’s involvement and Cocoon’s other producers, Lili Fini Zanuck and David Brown. The article listed the picture’s budget as $17.5 million, the same amount as 1985’s Cocoon.
       Although a 16 Mar 1987 People brief reported actor Jack Gilford saying “producers approached me about starting up shooting in May in Los Angeles and St. Petersburg, [FL],” the 29 Mar 1988 HR production chart, referring to the film by the title, Cocoon II: The Return, stated principal photography began on 21 Mar 1988 in San Francisco, CA, and Miami, FL. Production notes in AMPAS library files list additional Florida locations: Miami Seaquarium; Douglas Park, Morningside Park and Peacock Park of Miami; Rosensteil School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Coral Gables’ Miracle Mile neighborhood, Baptist Hospital, and Matheson Hammock Park and Marina; as well as No Name Harbor in Key Biscayne. Filming in Miami was completed on 3 Jun 1988, after which production “moved to ILM [Industrial Light & Magic] for the special effects work.” Though the films were made for the same of money, producer Richard D. Zanuck stated in the 6 Aug 1988 LAT that “the actors came fairly inexpensively and the effects cost a fortune” for Cocoon, while “the effects-having already been researched and developed-were relatively inexpensive and the actors cost a fortune” for the sequel.
       According to reports in the 29 Feb 1988 People and 11 Mar 1988 NYT, actor Brian Dennehy was unavailable to reprise his role from Cocoon (1985) due to participation in a theatrical production of “The Cherry Orchard” in New York during filming. However, a 21 Apr 1988 DV news item stated Dennehy was “able to segue to the Florida location” for the picture. The Dec 1988 AmCin stated that after principal photography was completed in Florida, Dennehy was filmed in Los Angeles, CA, and blue-screened into the appropriate scenes. Although Dennehy appears onscreen, he is not credited as a cast member.
       The 9 Nov 1988 Var reported the film would hold a premiere on 15 Nov 1988 in Washington, D.C., benefitting the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The 9 Nov 1988 LAT and 16 Nov 1988 HR listed the film also premiering on 16 Nov 1988 in Beverly Hills, CA, at the AMPAS Samuel Goldwyn Theater as a benefit for the Institute for Cancer and Blood Research. The film opened on 23 Nov 1988, as reported in the NYT review of the same date. According to the 29 Nov 1988 LAT, the picture took in $7.7 million during its first week of release in 986 theaters.
       A 27 Nov 1988 LAT article and 12 Dec 1988 People news brief noted that writer David Saperstein, whose 1985 novel Cocoon was the basis of the first picture, had provided Twentieth Century Fox with an outline regarding a sequel. However, the studio did not use Saperstein’s proposed outline. In 1988, Saperstein published his sequel, Metamorphosis: the Cocoon Story Continues. The LAT stated Saperstein planned to publish a third book in the 1990s, but modern sources list the final book of the trilogy as Butterfly: Tomorrow’s Children, published in 2014. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Dec 1988
p. 72.
Daily Variety
21 Apr 1988
p. 3.
Daily Variety
9 May 1988
p. 14, 23.
Daily Variety
16 Jun 1988
p. 8.
Daily Variety
21 Nov 1988
p. 3, 27.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Mar 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Mar 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Nov 1988
p. 6, 8.
Los Angeles Times
6 Aug 1988
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
9 Nov 1988
View, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
27 Nov 1988
Calendar, p. 46.
Los Angeles Times
29 Nov 1988
Calendar, p. 2.
New York Times
11 Mar 1988
Section C, p. 8.
New York Times
23 Nov 1988
Section C, p. 15.
People
16 Mar 1987.
---
People
29 Feb 1988.
---
People
12 Dec 1988.
---
Variety
9 Nov 1988
p. 28.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring…..in alphabetical order:
Co-Starring:
[and]
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Zanuck/Brown Company Production
Produced And Released By Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Panaglide op
Underwater cam
Elec best boy
Elec
Musco light op
Key grip
Grip best boy
Dolly grip
Still photog
Video coord
Video coord
ART DIRECTORS
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Addl ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst props
Set dressing
Set dressing
Const coord
Const foreman
Const gang boss
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Standby paint foreman
Greensman
Prop maker
Head scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Painter
Painter
Student scenic painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Asst to the cost des
Costumer
Seamstress
Seamstress
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
Orch
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cable person
Post prod sd services provided by
Sd des, Sprocket Systems
Re-rec mixer, Sprocket Systems
Re-rec mixer, Sprocket Systems
Re-rec mixer, Sprocket Systems
Supv sd ed, Sprocket Systems
Supv ADR ed, Sprocket Systems
Dial ed, Sprocket Systems
Sd eff ed, Sprocket Systems
Foley ed, Sprocket Systems
Asst sd ed, Sprocket Systems
Asst sd ed, Sprocket Systems
Asst sd ed, Sprocket Systems
Asst sd ed, Sprocket Systems
Asst sd ed, Sprocket Systems
Foley artist, Sprocket Systems
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff
Visual eff
Marin County, California
Visual eff supv, Industrial Light & Magic
Opt photog supv, Industrial Light & Magic
Anim supv, Industrial Light & Magic
Eff art dir, Industrial Light & Magic
Unit prod supv, Industrial Light & Magic
Visual eff ed, Industrial Light & Magic
Cam op, Industrial Light & Magic
Prod coord, Industrial Light & Magic
Opt cam op, Industrial Light & Magic
Opt cam op, Industrial Light & Magic
Opt cam op, Industrial Light & Magic
Opt cam op, Industrial Light & Magic
Opt lineup, Industrial Light & Magic
Opt lineup, Industrial Light & Magic
Opt lineup, Industrial Light & Magic
Opt lineup, Industrial Light & Magic
Opt lineup, Industrial Light & Magic
Motion control cam op, Industrial Light & Magic
Motion control cam op, Industrial Light & Magic
Motion control cam op, Industrial Light & Magic
Motion control cam op, Industrial Light & Magic
Roto supv, Industrial Light & Magic
Roto artist, Industrial Light & Magic
Roto artist, Industrial Light & Magic
Roto artist, Industrial Light & Magic
Roto artist, Industrial Light & Magic
Roto artist, Industrial Light & Magic
Anim, Industrial Light & Magic
Anim, Industrial Light & Magic
Anim, Industrial Light & Magic
Asst eff ed, Industrial Light & Magic
Gaffer, Industrial Light & Magic
Best boy, Industrial Light & Magic
Elec, Industrial Light & Magic
Key grip, Industrial Light & Magic
Grip, Industrial Light & Magic
Grip, Industrial Light & Magic
Spec alien creatures and eff by
Cannom creature eff crew
Cannom creature eff crew
Cannom creature eff crew
Cannom creature eff crew
Cannom creature eff crew
Cannom creature eff crew
Cannom creature eff crew
Cannom creature eff crew
Titles by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Cocoons by
Marine coord
BFL tech
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Loc mgr
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Asst casting
Orig "COCOON" casting
Public relations by
Unit pub
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Tech adv
Computer equip supplied by
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Lighting equip supplied by
Asst accountant
Asst to casting dir
Craft service
Film medic
Film medic
Shop intern prod asst
Teacher/Welfare worker
Lucky 4 security
Movieland Caterers
Driver/Cook
Cook's helper
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Projectionist
STAND INS
Stunt coord/Stunts by
Stunts by
Stunts by
Stunts by
Stunts by
Stunts by
Stunts by
Stunts by
Stunts by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by David Saperstein.
SONGS
“You Make Me Feel So Young,” written by Mack Gordon and Josef Myrow, performed by Frank Sinatra, courtesy of Capitol Records Inc. Special Markets Division
“Sweet Georgia Brown,” written by Ben Bernie, Kenneth Casey and Maceo Pinkard.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Cocoon II
Cocoon II: The Return
Release Date:
23 November 1988
Premiere Information:
Washington, D.C. premiere: 15 November 1988
Los Angeles premiere: 16 November 1988
Los Angeles and New York openings: 23 November 1988
Production Date:
21 March -- 3 June 1988
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
25 January 1989
Copyright Number:
PA399153
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® Cameras by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
116
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29302
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In St. Petersburg, Florida, senior citizen Bernie Lefkowitz sits by the grave of his late wife, Rose, saying he is lonely living at the Sunny Groves Rest Home. Elsewhere, teenager David turns off the television. However, it turns itself back on with David’s grandfather, Ben Luckett, onscreen. Ben says that he and David’s grandmother, Mary, are returning to visit Earth after leaving five years ago to live forever on the planet Antarea. David tells his mother, Susan, but she insists his grandparents were lost at sea. While arguing, the doorbell rings. Finding Ben and Mary Luckett at the door, Susan faints. At Sunny Groves, Bernie attempts to hang himself from a light fixture, but the fixture breaks. Hearing a knock at his door, Bernie opens it and is overjoyed to find his friends, Joe Finley, Joe’s wife, Alma, Bess McCarthy, and her husband, Art Selwyn, who left for Antarea with Ben and Mary. The following morning at Capt. Jack’s Glass Bottom Boat Tours and Souvenirs shop, Jack Bonner sees Kitty, an Antarean alien he met five years before. Kitty tells him seismic activity on the ocean floor is disturbing the cocoons containing Antareans previously left on Earth. Jack agrees to help Kitty and her fellow Antareans, Pillsbury and Doc, retrieve the cocoons. At the Sunrise Court motel, Joe and Art meet proprietress Ruby Feinberg. Afterward, Ben arrives in his classic Cadillac. The men come to Sunny Groves to take Bernie to the beach. However, an orderly informs Bernie he cannot leave the premises and tries to push Art out of the way. Art ... +


In St. Petersburg, Florida, senior citizen Bernie Lefkowitz sits by the grave of his late wife, Rose, saying he is lonely living at the Sunny Groves Rest Home. Elsewhere, teenager David turns off the television. However, it turns itself back on with David’s grandfather, Ben Luckett, onscreen. Ben says that he and David’s grandmother, Mary, are returning to visit Earth after leaving five years ago to live forever on the planet Antarea. David tells his mother, Susan, but she insists his grandparents were lost at sea. While arguing, the doorbell rings. Finding Ben and Mary Luckett at the door, Susan faints. At Sunny Groves, Bernie attempts to hang himself from a light fixture, but the fixture breaks. Hearing a knock at his door, Bernie opens it and is overjoyed to find his friends, Joe Finley, Joe’s wife, Alma, Bess McCarthy, and her husband, Art Selwyn, who left for Antarea with Ben and Mary. The following morning at Capt. Jack’s Glass Bottom Boat Tours and Souvenirs shop, Jack Bonner sees Kitty, an Antarean alien he met five years before. Kitty tells him seismic activity on the ocean floor is disturbing the cocoons containing Antareans previously left on Earth. Jack agrees to help Kitty and her fellow Antareans, Pillsbury and Doc, retrieve the cocoons. At the Sunrise Court motel, Joe and Art meet proprietress Ruby Feinberg. Afterward, Ben arrives in his classic Cadillac. The men come to Sunny Groves to take Bernie to the beach. However, an orderly informs Bernie he cannot leave the premises and tries to push Art out of the way. Art grabs the orderly’s arm and flips him. As Art leaves, residents of Sunny Groves applaud. Meanwhile aboard Jack’s boat, Manta IV, Kitty, Pillsbury and Doc SCUBA dive to retrieve the cocoons. Alone onboard, Jack sees a ship from the St. Petersburg Oceanographic Institute lifting a lone cocoon in a net. Afterward, Jack, Kitty, Pillsbury and Doc break into the Oceanographic Institute to locate the cocoon. Pillsbury sheds his human skin and floats into an air duct in his Antarean form. He finds the cocoon being scanned by scientists Sara, Doug, and Rebecca. As images appear, Sara notices the cocoon contains a humanoid figure. In the evening, Art, Bess, Joe, and Alma take Bernie to a supper club. While dancing, Art sees Ruby Feinberg at the bar, and thinks she would be a good match for Bernie. After Ruby joins the group, Bernie begins to enjoy himself. Liking Bernie, Ruby kisses him. However, Bernie tells her he is a married man, and leaves. The following morning, Alma goes jogging and sees a preschooler crying. Approaching the girl and her teacher, Alma places her hands on the child’s forehead and, with her powerful Antarean life-force, heals her. As the teacher takes the girl to the first aid station, Alma agrees to watch the children, and tells them about Antarea: a far off planet where no one dies or gets sick. At Sunrise Court, Bernie arrives to meet Art and Joe and sees Ruby, who apologizes for kissing him. When Ruby offers to buy him a drink that evening, Bernie declines, but she insists. Afterward, Bernie, Joe, Ben and Art go the park for lunch. While eating, a basketball lands on their food. The young men from the basketball court come to retrieve their ball, but Bernie yells at them. Art suggests a four-against-four basketball game, and Ben wagers that the oldsters will win. The young men accept the bet. As the game progresses, the young men are stunned by the agility of Art, Joe and Ben. After Art slam-dunks the ball, Bernie is passed the ball and scores the winning basket. Elsewhere, Bess faints while shopping with Alma and Mary. At the St. Petersburg General Hospital, Bess’s doctor informs Art that she is six-weeks pregnant. While at the hospital, Joe meets with a doctor about a pain in his side, and is informed that his leukemia has returned. When Joe arrives back at Sunrise Court, Alma tells him she was offered a job at a preschool for foster children. Not wanting to dampen her good mood, Joe does not mention his cancer. At the St. Petersburg Oceanographic Institute, the cocoon is opened, revealing an Antarean alien. Dubbed “Phil,” the alien is moved to an observation room, where he shows signs of reading Sara’s thoughts. Later, Sara demonstrates Phil’s abilities for General Jefferds of the United States Air Force. Jefferds informs her boss, Dr. Baron, that Phil will be transported to a secret location. Sara overhears, and worries for Phil’s safety. Aboard the docked Manta IV, Jack gives Kitty a seashell, and reminds her that during her last visit to Earth, they had a passionate night when they “shared themselves.” Kitty tells Jack she would like to do that again, but he insists they go on a date first. Later at a French restaurant, Kitty becomes highly aroused after taking a bite of her food, and levitates while glowing. The glow leaves her body as a comet and soars throughout the restaurant. As diners run for cover, Jack and Kitty leave. Elsewhere, Ruby and Bernie go to a nightclub. As Bernie dances with Ruby, he kisses her. However, he sees a vision of his dead wife, Rose, and tells Ruby he made a mistake. Ruby tells him he needs to move on. In the morning on Manta IV, Kitty apologizes to Jack for her behavior. Jack suggests that perhaps he is not meant to find love. Wanting to ease his doubt, Kitty lulls Jack into a dream state and shows him his future wife and two daughters. Unable to see the woman’s face, Jack notices a red, heart-shaped birthmark on her neck. Later, Kitty enlists Ben, Mary, Art, Bess, Alma and Joe to rescue Phil before the Antarean ship returns at midnight. Bernie arrives, and overhearing that his friends are leaving again, storms away. Later, Alma goes to the preschool to see the children. While playing, one boy runs into the street. Just before a car strikes him, Alma pushes him and is hit instead. At the hospital, Joe is told Alma is in a coma. To save her, he places his hand over Alma’s heart and gives her his life-force. Alma awakens, and Joe tells her to take the offered job. As they embrace, Joe dies. In the evening, Ben and Mary say good-bye to David, and drive to Sunrise Court to pick up their friends and say good-bye to Bernie. However, Alma plans to remain on Earth. After Ben drives away, Bernie apologizes to Ruby. Bess and Mary board the Manta IV, while Kitty joins Ben and Art in the Cadillac. Following an institute cargo truck to a restaurant parking lot, Ben, Art and Kitty sneak into the truck bed. After the truck leaves, David appears from the Cadillac’s trunk and follows them to the institute. Once inside, Art disguises himself as a security guard, while Kitty reverts to Antarean form. When Ben locates Phil, Art shuts down the lab’s power. In the dark, Ben grabs Phil and hides. As the lights come back on, Sara and her colleagues notice Phil is missing and go searching for him. In the hallway, Art directs them to Antarean Kitty, pretending to be Phil. While the scientists follow her, Ben goes toward the rear door. However, the security gate begins to lower. David finds Ben and helps him stop the closing gate. As Ben and David run outside, Sara tries to stop them. Ben explains Phil needs to return home. Seeing Phil dying, Sara lets them escape. Reaching the shore, Ben and David join Kitty and Art. Jack arrives in an inflatable boat and they head to the Manta IV. After boarding, an Antaraen spaceship appears overhead. Walter, the leader of the past Antarean mission to Earth, materializes in human form. As the Antareans prepare the cocoons, Ben and Mary decide to stay on Earth with David. Art and the pregnant Bess decide to return to Antarea where they will be able to experience their future child growing up. After saying good-bye, the cocoons, Antareans, Art and Bess are teleported to the spaceship, which flies away. Later at the dock, David, Ben and Mary leave as Jack locks up his boat. Sara appears, saying she ran out of gasoline. Jack offers to give her a ride to the gas station. As Sara tells Jack she just quit her job, he notices a red, heart-shaped birthmark on her neck. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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