Dudes (1988)

R | 97 mins | Adventure, Comedy | 24 June 1988

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HISTORY

An article in the 11 Sep 1987 BAM reported that director Penelope Spheeris first read the script for Dudes in Mar 1986, but producers Herb Jaffe and Miguel Tejada-Flores wanted director Ridley Scott for the project. However, Spheeris was hired after the producers and Scott could not agree on the picture’s “vision.”
       The 3 Sep 1986 Var production chart stated that principal photography began on 14 Aug 1986, with locations in Arizona, and Los Angeles, CA. Production notes in AMPAS library files note that filming in Arizona lasted four weeks, and additional locations included New Mexico and Utah.
       Although the 15 Jan 1987 DV reported that the film was scheduled for an Apr 1987 release, a brief in the 19 Jul 1987 LAT noted the release had been moved to Sep 1987. Four months later, an 8 Nov 1987 LAT news item reported the picture’s opening was rescheduled yet again to early Dec 1987, then to Jan 1988. The film opened in limited release in New York on 24 Jun 1988, as stated in the NYT review published on that date.
       According to the 28 Oct 1987 Var, Heron Communications filed a lawsuit against Vista Organization regarding home video rights to the picture and nine additional Vista-produced films. Heron claimed Vista was “attempting to renege on its commitment” due to a possible merger with Carolco Pictures. However, Vista chair Seymour Malamed was reported as saying there was never an agreement between Vista and Heron. At the time this record was written, the outcome of this suit ... More Less

An article in the 11 Sep 1987 BAM reported that director Penelope Spheeris first read the script for Dudes in Mar 1986, but producers Herb Jaffe and Miguel Tejada-Flores wanted director Ridley Scott for the project. However, Spheeris was hired after the producers and Scott could not agree on the picture’s “vision.”
       The 3 Sep 1986 Var production chart stated that principal photography began on 14 Aug 1986, with locations in Arizona, and Los Angeles, CA. Production notes in AMPAS library files note that filming in Arizona lasted four weeks, and additional locations included New Mexico and Utah.
       Although the 15 Jan 1987 DV reported that the film was scheduled for an Apr 1987 release, a brief in the 19 Jul 1987 LAT noted the release had been moved to Sep 1987. Four months later, an 8 Nov 1987 LAT news item reported the picture’s opening was rescheduled yet again to early Dec 1987, then to Jan 1988. The film opened in limited release in New York on 24 Jun 1988, as stated in the NYT review published on that date.
       According to the 28 Oct 1987 Var, Heron Communications filed a lawsuit against Vista Organization regarding home video rights to the picture and nine additional Vista-produced films. Heron claimed Vista was “attempting to renege on its commitment” due to a possible merger with Carolco Pictures. However, Vista chair Seymour Malamed was reported as saying there was never an agreement between Vista and Heron. At the time this record was written, the outcome of this suit could not be determined.
       End credits state: “Special Thanks To Bill Kirkpatrick at the Arizona Film Commission.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
BAM
11 Sep 1987
p. 10, 12.
Daily Variety
15 Jan 1987
p. 61.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jul 1988
p. 3, 11.
Los Angeles Times
19 Jul 1987
Calendar, p. 20.
Los Angeles Times
8 Nov 1987
Calendar, p. 93.
Los Angeles Times
1 Jul 1988
Calendar, p. 8.
New York Times
24 Jun 1988
Section C, p. 9.
Variety
3 Sep 1986
p. 6.
Variety
23 Sep 1987
p. 28.
Variety
28 Oct 1987
p. 40.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
The Vista Organization, Ltd. Presents
A Penelope Spheeris Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
3d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Line prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d unit dir of photog
Addl 1st asst
Addl 1st asst
Still photog
Asst still photog
Chief lighting tech
Chief lighting tech
Elec best boy
Elec best boy
Elec best boy
Key grip
Best boy
Grip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Art dept asst
Sketch illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Assoc ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set const (Los Angeles)
Const coord (Arizona)
Set dec
Leadman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Asst prop master
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst des
Key costumer
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus exec prod
Asst mus supv
Asst mus supv
Mus supv for MCA Records
MCA mus coord
SOUND
Sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley rec
Re-rec
Re-rec
Dubbing rec
Ultra Stereo consultant
Post prod sd
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Pyrotechnician
Spec eff lead
Spec eff asst
Opt line-up
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Asst makeup/hair
Asst makeup/hair
Asst makeup/hair
Asst makeup/hair
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod coord
Loc mgr (Los Angeles)
Loc mgr (Arizona)
Casting asst
Extra casting
Scr supv
Prod auditor
Asst prod auditor
Post prod accountant
Prod secy
Prod secy
Asst to Penelope Spheeris
Post prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Promotions
First aid
Craft service (Los Angeles)
Craft service (Arizona)
Caterer
Wrangler
Animal trainer
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
STAND INS
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Telecine colorist
Processing by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Urban Struggle,” performed by The Vandals, music by Jan Sakert, lyrics by Stevo, published by Vandalco (ASCAP)
“Jesus Came Driving Along,” performed by The Leather Nun, composed by Bengt “Aron” Aronsson, courtesy of Wire Records, published by Red Herring Music
“Number Off The Bathroom Wall,” performed by Faster Pussycat, composed by Taime Molvik, courtesy of Electra/Asylum Records by arrangement with Warner Special Products, published by Gypsy Fetish Music (ASCAP)
+
SONGS
“Urban Struggle,” performed by The Vandals, music by Jan Sakert, lyrics by Stevo, published by Vandalco (ASCAP)
“Jesus Came Driving Along,” performed by The Leather Nun, composed by Bengt “Aron” Aronsson, courtesy of Wire Records, published by Red Herring Music
“Number Off The Bathroom Wall,” performed by Faster Pussycat, composed by Taime Molvik, courtesy of Electra/Asylum Records by arrangement with Warner Special Products, published by Gypsy Fetish Music (ASCAP)
“Dirty Pool,” performed by The Little Kings, composed by Gore Verbinski and Bernie Bernstein, produced by Charlie Sexton
“Lost Highway,” performed by The Little Kings, composed by John Thum, produced by Charlie Sexton, published by Ed’s Music, administered by BUG
“Guitarget,” performed by Four Big Guitars From Texas, composed by Ray Benson, courtesy of Amazing Records/Bug Music, published by Paw Paw Music (BMI), administered by Bug
“Yard Dog,” performed by The Tail Gators, composed by Wesley Ferrier, courtesy of Wrestler Records, published by Tek Music (BMI)
“Mountain Song,” performed by Jane’s Addiction, lyrics by Perry Farrell, music by Jane’s Addiction, courtesy of Triple X Entertainment, published by I’ll Hit You Back Music (BMI)
“Rock ‘N’ Roll Till The Cows Come Home,” performed by The Tail Gators, composed by Don Leady, courtesy of Wrestler Records/Bug Music, published by Le Ray Music/Bug Music (BMI), administered by Bug
“Show No Mercy,” performed by W.A.S.P., composed by Blackie Lawless, courtesy of Music For Nations, published by Zomba Enterprises, Inc.
“Vengeance Is Mine,” performed by Simon Steele & The Claw, composed by Simon Steele, published by Steele Music (BMI)
“Rock ‘N’ Roll Outlaw,” performed by Keel, composed by Gary Anderson, Michael Cocks & Peter Wells, courtesy of MCA Records, published by J. Albert & Sons U.S.A. Inc. (BMI)
“Dead Dog Man,” performed by The Little Kings, composed by Gore Verbinski, produced by Charlie Sexton
“Blue Suede Shoes,” performed by Robert Gordon & Chris Spedding, composed by Carl Perkins, published by Right Song Music, Inc. (BMI), administered by Unichappell Music, Inc.
“Amazing Grace,” performed by Steve Vai
“Waltz Across Texas,” performed by Ernest Tubb, composed by Talmadge Tubb, published by Ernest Tubb Music (BMI)
“If You Love Somebody, Set Them Free,” composed by Sting, published by Magnetic Publishing, Ltd./Regatta Music, Ltd. (BMI)
“Time Forgot You,” performed by Legal Weapon, composed by Kat Arthur & Brian Hansen, courtesy of MCA Records, published by Weapon Music (BMI)
“Cocaine & Whiskey,” performed by Ned Sublette, composted by Ned Sublette, published by Ned Sublette (ASCAP)
“Mexican Radio,” composed by Wall of Voodoo, published by Illegal Songs, Inc. (BMI).
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 June 1988
Premiere Information:
Screening at Toronto Festival of Festivals: 1987
New York opening: 24 June 1988
Los Angeles opening: 1 July 1988
Production Date:
began 14 August 1986
Copyright Claimant:
The Vista Organization Partnership, L.P.
Copyright Date:
23 November 1987
Copyright Number:
PA0000357381
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded by Ultra-Stereo®
Color
Prints
Prints by De Luxe®
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, punk rockers Grant, “Biscuit” and Milo decide to move to Los Angeles, California. As their road trip takes them through the West, they are waved to the side of the road by “Daredelvis,” an Elvis Presley-impersonating rodeo clown. After Grant and Biscuit help Daredelvis move his trailer out of a ditch, they continue their journey. In the evening, they set up camp near an outcrop of rocks in the desert. However, a gang driving black trucks and motorcycles invades the campsite. Gang leader “Missoula” orders his men, Blix, Wes and Red, to steal all the money they can find. Milo pleads for Missoula to leave them alone, but Wes aims his pistol and takes Milo’s leather jacket. Red claims they are going too far, and Milo, Grant and Biscuit flee up the rock ledge. Milo falls and Missoula shoots Milo in the head. Throughout the night, the two survivors hike until Grant sees a vision of a cowboy on horseback. Leading Biscuit, Grant follows the cowboy, but awakens in the morning on a local’s front porch. Contacting the town sheriff, Grant reports Milo’s murder by Missoula. However, the sheriff informs him that there has been no crime because Milo’s body cannot be found. The sheriff orders Grant and Biscuit to leave town, and tells Grant that if they looked like “normal folks,” Milo might still be alive. While driving, Grant decides he and Biscuit need to find Missoula on their own. Biscuit refuses, but Grant convinces him they need to avenge Milo’s death. Heading north, they stop ... +


In New York City, punk rockers Grant, “Biscuit” and Milo decide to move to Los Angeles, California. As their road trip takes them through the West, they are waved to the side of the road by “Daredelvis,” an Elvis Presley-impersonating rodeo clown. After Grant and Biscuit help Daredelvis move his trailer out of a ditch, they continue their journey. In the evening, they set up camp near an outcrop of rocks in the desert. However, a gang driving black trucks and motorcycles invades the campsite. Gang leader “Missoula” orders his men, Blix, Wes and Red, to steal all the money they can find. Milo pleads for Missoula to leave them alone, but Wes aims his pistol and takes Milo’s leather jacket. Red claims they are going too far, and Milo, Grant and Biscuit flee up the rock ledge. Milo falls and Missoula shoots Milo in the head. Throughout the night, the two survivors hike until Grant sees a vision of a cowboy on horseback. Leading Biscuit, Grant follows the cowboy, but awakens in the morning on a local’s front porch. Contacting the town sheriff, Grant reports Milo’s murder by Missoula. However, the sheriff informs him that there has been no crime because Milo’s body cannot be found. The sheriff orders Grant and Biscuit to leave town, and tells Grant that if they looked like “normal folks,” Milo might still be alive. While driving, Grant decides he and Biscuit need to find Missoula on their own. Biscuit refuses, but Grant convinces him they need to avenge Milo’s death. Heading north, they stop at a roadside bazaar and learn Missoula has passed by. Seeing smoke off the side of the road, Grant pulls over and finds a black truck. Nearby, Red, one of Missoula’s men, lies bloodly on the ground. With his last breath, Red tells them that Missoula is going toward Wyoming or Montana. After Red dies, Grant and Biscuit take his firearms. Reaching Utah, Grant pulls into a service station. As Jessie, the female attendant, fills up the fuel tank, Biscuit and Grant go into a café. However, the locals do not like their punk rock look, and chase them out. They race away in their car, forgetting to pay Jessie. Frustrated, Biscuit wants to give up their search, but then sees Missoula’s truck. Biscuit tries to run Missoula off the road as Grant fires Red’s pistol. However, they lose control and crash. Jessie appears in her tow truck and offers to let them stay at her house. As Biscuit sleeps, Grant tells Jessie about Milo’s murder. Later, Jessie offers to teach Grant how to properly shoot a gun and takes him horseback riding. Camping out for the night, Jessie kisses Grant. Meanwhile, Biscuit dreams he is living in a Native American village. Suddenly, the village is attacked by the U.S. Cavalry led by Missoula. Awakening, Biscuit arms himself with a bow and arrow. When Grant and Jessie return, Biscuit insists they leave soon so as not to lose Missoula’s trail. Jessie outfits Grant and Biscuit with new clothes, guns and a new vehicle to blend in better. With Biscuit’s newly acquired tracking skills, they arrive at a small town in Wyoming. Arriving at a visiting rodeo, Grant sees Wes, one of Missoula’s gang members, wearing Milo’s leather jacket. Recognizing Daredelvis as one of the performers, Grant and Biscuit approach him for help. Daredelvis lures Wes into his trailer. At gunpoint, Grant demands Milo’s jacket and asks about Missoula. Wes removes the jacket and runs away. Grant catches him in the bullpen, but a bull attacks and gores Wes to death. Afterward, Daredelvis tells them that Missoula may be camped out at the ghost town of Lone Jack. With a bottle of Daredelvis’s specially-brewed snake juice, Grant and Biscuit leave. Finding the town deserted, Grant and Biscuit build a campfire and get drunk. Suddenly, Grant sees the cowboy from the night of Milo’s murder. The cowboy introduces himself as Witherspoon. Gesturing behind him, Grant and Biscuit see Native American warriors, and Biscuit recognizes them from his dream. In the morning, Grant and Biscuit awaken with hangovers. Donning Milo’s jacket, Grant finds a matchbook for The Buckaroo bar in Montana. Grant goes to The Buckaroo and finds Missoula and Blix drinking with their girl friends. He approaches, but neither gang member remembers him. Leaving the bar, Grant and Biscuit wait for the right moment to confront Missoula. Later, Missoula, Blix, and their girl friends go to a movie theater, and Grant and Biscuit follow. They aim their guns, but Missoula’s girl friend sees them and screams. Running out of the theater, Grant and Biscuit try to drive away, but the town sheriff stops them. Jessie receives a telephone call from the sheriff that Grant and Biscuit have been arrested. Meanwhile, Missoula and Blix kill the sheriff and his deputy to get to Grant and Biscuit. As Missoula looks for the jail keys, Jessie arrives and crashes through the wall with her tow truck. Missoula and Blix flee on horseback while Grant and Biscuit shoot at them. As Blix falls dead, Grant follows Missoula to an abandoned warehouse. Following a trail of blood, Grant tackles Missoula. Believing he is dead, Grant turns to leave, but Missoula shoots him in the arm. Grant fires and kills Missoula. Afterward, Grant goes outside and sees the cowboy Witherspoon tipping his hat. As Witherspoon rides away with the three warriors, Milo appears on horseback, waves good-bye to Grant, and disappears. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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