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Before filming began, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles was already a thriving franchise. The 29 Feb 1988 DV described it as “a successful children’s concept that includes a full toy line, comic books, tv programming, games and a full line of merchandising.” The first animated home video, subtitled Heroes in a Half-Shell, “blitzed the homevid market, selling $200,000 units,” according to the 16 Dec 1988 DV. One of the film’s production companies, Golden Harvest, led by executive producer Raymond Chow Ting-hsing (billed in credits as Raymond Chow), was a Hong Kong-based operation whose previous stars were Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan.
       Principal photography began 7 Jul 1989 in Wilmington, NC, the 11 Aug 1989 DV noted. Two-and-a-half months later, the 27 Sep 1989 DV described the film as having been “recently” completed. The 4 Aug 1989 HR noted that the budget was $12 million, but a twenty-fifth anniversary retrospective in the 2 Apr 2015 HR placed the cost closer to $13.5 million. The original producer-distributor, Twentieth Century Fox, withdrew at the last moment, and New Line Cinema and Garden Harvest stepped in ten days before filming began. The movie’s New York City scenes were shot during the production’s last five days. Though Golden Harvest suggested they shoot in Hong Kong, filming was restricted to NC and NY.
       The turtles’ foam-rubber latex costumes, designed by Jim Henson’s Creature Shop in London, England, weighed seventy pounds. For close-ups, the faces contained radio-controlled motors that controlled the mouths, eye movements, and eyebrows. Josh Pais (“Raphael”) is the only actor who both portrayed and supplied the voice for ... More Less

Before filming began, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles was already a thriving franchise. The 29 Feb 1988 DV described it as “a successful children’s concept that includes a full toy line, comic books, tv programming, games and a full line of merchandising.” The first animated home video, subtitled Heroes in a Half-Shell, “blitzed the homevid market, selling $200,000 units,” according to the 16 Dec 1988 DV. One of the film’s production companies, Golden Harvest, led by executive producer Raymond Chow Ting-hsing (billed in credits as Raymond Chow), was a Hong Kong-based operation whose previous stars were Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan.
       Principal photography began 7 Jul 1989 in Wilmington, NC, the 11 Aug 1989 DV noted. Two-and-a-half months later, the 27 Sep 1989 DV described the film as having been “recently” completed. The 4 Aug 1989 HR noted that the budget was $12 million, but a twenty-fifth anniversary retrospective in the 2 Apr 2015 HR placed the cost closer to $13.5 million. The original producer-distributor, Twentieth Century Fox, withdrew at the last moment, and New Line Cinema and Garden Harvest stepped in ten days before filming began. The movie’s New York City scenes were shot during the production’s last five days. Though Golden Harvest suggested they shoot in Hong Kong, filming was restricted to NC and NY.
       The turtles’ foam-rubber latex costumes, designed by Jim Henson’s Creature Shop in London, England, weighed seventy pounds. For close-ups, the faces contained radio-controlled motors that controlled the mouths, eye movements, and eyebrows. Josh Pais (“Raphael”) is the only actor who both portrayed and supplied the voice for one of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. He also appeared as a passenger in a taxi cab that nearly ran over his Raphael character. “Splinter,” the ninja master rat, is not listed in cast credits because he was an animatronic “puppet,” the 30 Mar 1990 HR reported.
       The film premiered 24 Mar 1990 in Universal City, CA, as a fund-raiser for local children’s centers, as stated in the 27 Mar 1990 LAT. Reviewers generally found the film likeable, but dimly photographed and uneven, and the 22 Feb 1989 DV decried its “overtones of racism in its use of Oriental villains.” Upon release, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles “shattered box office records, with a $25.4-million weekend opening,” the 4 Apr 1990 Var announced. The 23 Mar 2013 South China Morning Post reported that the film “grossed more than US $200 million worldwide.” The 2 Apr 2015 HR claimed that it “broke the record for the highest-grossing independent film of all time.”
       Director Steve Barron and producer Simon Fields, who were fired in Nov 1989, sued Golden Harvest Films Inc. and Raymond Chow for $5 million, alleging they were not paid their fair share of net profits, according to the 11 Oct 1990 LAT. . Co-producer Graham Cottle also sued for nonpayment of his percentage of profits, the 15 Oct 1990 Var added.
       Opening credits give the following acknowledgments: “Special thanks to Renay and Mark Freedman and Surge Licensing, Inc.” End credits contain the following acknowledgments: "'Aesop's Fables: Tortoise Beats Hare,' Jay Ward Productions, courtesy of Peter Piech--Film Tel International Corp." and “Special thanks to: Cheryl and Jim Prindle--Mirage Studios; the people and the City of Wilmington, North Carolina; Mayor's Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting, New York--Patricia Reed Scott, Director; Lt. John D. Gasperin, New York City Police Department, Movie-TV Unit; David Gunn--New York Metropolitan Transit Authority; Brady Distributors, Inc.; British Knights Shoes; Burger King; Domino's Pizza; Rodney Gordon; Honda Martial Arts; The Huffy Bicycles Company; The JVC Corporation of America; Konami Video; Macho Products, Ltd.; The Omni Park Central, NYC; Pepsi Cola--Wilmington, North Carolina; Shinbi; Trash and Vaudeville.” End credits also provide the following information: “Filmed at the North Carolina Film Studios, Wilmington, N.C. and on location in North Carolina and New York City.” Also, “The characters, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Leonardo, Raphael, Michaelangelo, Donatello, Splinter, April and The Shredder, are registered copyright ©1984 Mirage Studios and are trademarks owned and licensed by Mirage Studios.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Feb 1988
p. 26.
Daily Variety
16 Dec 1988
p. 20.
Daily Variety
11 Aug 1989.
p. 14.
Daily Variety
27 Sep 1989
p. 3.
Daily Variety
29 Mar 1990
p. 2, 9.
Daily Variety
10 Oct 1990
p. 3.
Daily Variety
29 May 1992
p. 30.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Mar 1990
p. 12, 64.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 2015.
---
Los Angeles Times
27 Mar 1990
Calendar, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
30 Mar 1990
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
11 Oct 1990
Calendar, p. 2.
New York Times
30 Mar 1990
p. 8.
South China Morning Post
23 Mar 2013.
---
Variety
28 Mar 1990
pp. 22-23.
Variety
4 Apr 1990
p. 5.
Variety
15 Oct 1990
p. 6.
WSJ
8 Jun 1990.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Golden Harvest Presents
A Limelight Production
In association with Gary Propper
A Steve Barron film
A Golden Harvest Presentation
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
Prod mgr, New York unit
PRODUCERS
Prod
Prod
Co-prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Cable man/Communications
Key grip
Best boy
Dolly grip
Rigging grip supv
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Gaffer (Wilmington)
Gaffer (New York)
Best boy/Generator op
Best boy/Generator op (New York)
Rigging gaffer
Rigging gaffer
Elec
Video tech
Video tech asst
Puppeteer video asst
Still photog
Dir of photog/Op, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
Best boy, 2d unit
Best boy, 2d unit
Elec, 2d unit
Elec, 2d unit
1st asst cam, New York unit
2d asst cam, New York unit
Steadicam op, New York unit
Asst steadicam, New York unit
Key grip, New York unit
Dolly grip, New York unit
Best boy grip, New York unit
Grip, New York unit
Grip, New York unit
Elec, New York unit
Elec, New York unit
Elec, New York unit
Elec, New York unit
Translights by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
April's sketches
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Ed apprentice
Ed apprentice
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Prop master
Const coord
Set des
On-set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Const foreman
Const asst
Lead carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Lead scenic artist
Standby scenic artist
Scenic artist
Set sign painter
Painter
Painter
Plaster foreman
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Prop master, 2d unit
Prop master, New York unit
Asst prop, New York unit
Asst prop, New York unit
Asst prop, New York unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Ward shop supv
Ward asst
Ward asst
Cost crafts
Seamstress
Ward supv, New York unit
MUSIC
Mus rec supv
Mus supv
Mus supv
Mus coord
Scoring eng/Mixer
Orch rec
Mus ed asst
SOUND
Sd eff
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
ADR mixer
ADR supv
ADR ed
Dolby Stereo consultant
Loc sd mixer
Boom man
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Sd/Video tech, 2d unit
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Asst spec eff
SPFX prod asst
Creative supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Project supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Project coord, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Project coord, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Visual supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Computer and electronic supv, Jim Henson's Creatur
Computer and electronic fabrication and maintenanc
Mechanical des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanical des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanical des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanical des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanical fabrication, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanical fabrication, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanical fabrication, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mould supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mould maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mould maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mould maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Foam lab supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Foam lab tech Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Suit des, fabrication and maintenance, Jim Henson'
Suit des, fabrication and maintenance, Jim Henson'
Suit des, fabrication and maintenance, Jim Henson'
Suit des, fabrication and maintenance, Jim Henson'
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Make-up artist
Addl make-up
Hair stylist
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
Hair/Make-up artist, New York unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Exec in charge of prod
Prod supv
Scr supv
Prod exec
Asst to prods and dir
Prod assoc
Prod comptroller
Prod accountant
Prod office supv
Prod coord
Prod secy
Loc scout
Asst to Simon Fields
Asst to Steve Barron (U.K.)
Asst prod accountant
Casting dir, Action Casting of the Southeast, Inc.
Asst casting dir, Action Casting of the Southeast,
Asst casting dir--N.Y.
Voice casting
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Unit pub
New York martial arts trainer
Physio-therapist
Medic
Craft service
Craft service
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Office prod asst
Scr supv, 2d unit
Prod asst, 2d unit
Prod supv, New York unit
New York loc mgr, New York unit
Asst loc mgr, New York unit
Asst prod office coord, New York unit
Set prod asst, New York unit
Set prod asst, New York unit
Set prod asst, New York unit
Set prod asst, New York unit
Set prod asst, New York unit
Office prod asst, New York unit
Parking coord, New York unit
Transportation capt, New York unit
Loc consultant, New York unit
STAND INS
Raphael, The voice
Michaelangelo, The voice
Leonardo, The voice
Splinter, The voice
The Shredder, The voice
Tatsu, The voice
and
Donatello, The voice
as Donatello
Stunt coord and martial arts choreog
Martial arts consultant
Asst martial arts consultant
Turtle stunt double
Turtle stunt double
Turtle stunt double
Turtle stunt double
Turtle stunt double
and
Turtle stunt double
as Donatello
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
ANIMATION
Animatronic characters by
Chief puppeteer
Raphael, Animatronic puppeteer
Michaelangelo, Animatronic puppeteer
Donatello, Animatronic puppeteer
Leonardo, Animatronic puppeteer
Splinter, Animatronic puppeteer
Splinter, Animatronic puppeteer
Splinter, Animatronic puppeteer
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird, exclusively licensed by Surge Licensing, Inc.
SONGS
“Tequila,” written by Chuck Rio, Mask Publishing, Inc. (BMI) and Duck Soup Music (BMI), recorded by The Champs, courtesy of Mask, Inc.
“Family,” written by Monty Seward, ©1990 EMI April Music, Inc./Monty Seward Publishing Co., performed by RIFF, courtesy of SBK Records
“This Is What We Do,” written by M.C. Hammer, ©1990 Bust It Music/EMI Blackwood Music, Inc., performed by M.C. Hammer, courtesy of Capitol Records
+
SONGS
“Tequila,” written by Chuck Rio, Mask Publishing, Inc. (BMI) and Duck Soup Music (BMI), recorded by The Champs, courtesy of Mask, Inc.
“Family,” written by Monty Seward, ©1990 EMI April Music, Inc./Monty Seward Publishing Co., performed by RIFF, courtesy of SBK Records
“This Is What We Do,” written by M.C. Hammer, ©1990 Bust It Music/EMI Blackwood Music, Inc., performed by M.C. Hammer, courtesy of Capitol Records
“Every Heart Needs A Home,” written by Paul Peterson, Carl Sturken and Evan Rogers, ©1990 EMI Musikverlag GmbH/St. Paul Music (administered by EMI April Music, Inc.)/MCA Music Publishing/Bayjun Beat Music, performed by St. Paul, courtesy of Atlantic Records
“Let The Walls Come Down,” written by Johnny Kemp and Rhett Lawrence, ©1990 EMI April Music, Inc./Mochrie Music/BMG Songs/Rhettrhyme Music, performed by Johnny Kemp, courtesy of Columbia Records
“Spin That Wheel,” written by Ya Kid K – Kovall/El Sati, ©1989 BMC Publishing and Bogam Publishing, administered by Colgems-EMI Music, Inc., performed by HI Tek 3, courtesy of ARS Records
“9.95,” written by Dan Hartman and Charlie Midnight, ©1990 EMI April Music, Inc./Constant Evaluation Music, Inc./EMI Blackwood Music, Inc./Janiceps Music, performed by Spunkadelic, courtesy of SBK Records
“T-U-R-T-L-E Power!” written by James P. Alpern and Richard A. Usher, Jr., ©1990 EMI Blackwood Music, Inc., performed by Partners in Kryme, courtesy of SBK Records.
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 March 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 24 March 1990
Los Angeles opening: 30 March 1990
New York opening: 30 March 1990
Production Date:
7 July - mid September 1989
Copyright Claimant:
Northshore Investments, Ltd.
Copyright Date:
13 April 1990
Copyright Number:
PA464503
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo® in selected theaters
Color
Prints
Prints by De Luxe©
Duration(in mins):
93
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30181
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

New York City television reporter April O'Neil covers a wave of robberies, and as she leaves the station at night, young thugs attack her. Lights on the street suddenly go dark. By the time police arrive, the delinquents have been tied up and April sits stunned. Seeing a dagger laying on the pavement, she slides it into her purse. In a sewer beneath the city, four teenage mutant ninja turtles—Raphael, Michaelangelo, Donatello, and Leonardo—“high-five” each other to celebrate their vigilante mission as they return to their underground lair. They inform “Master Splinter,” a four-foot-high rat, that all went well, but Splinter is concerned whether any humans saw them. When Raphael wants to go back and retrieve his sai, a Japanese dagger, Splinter tells him to forget it. Michaelangelo orders pizza on a pay telephone. They skateboard through the sewer to a street grate, where a pizza deliveryman makes the exchange of money for food through the bars. Raphael dons a Fedora hat and trench coat and ventures out to see a movie. Seeing a purse snatching, he knocks down the two juvenile delinquents and tosses the purse back to its owner. As the gangsters run into a park, Casey Jones, a young crime fighter wearing a hockey mask, gives chase and delivers a beating with his hockey stick. When Raphael interrupts and allows the teenagers to escape, Jones hits Raphael with a cricket bat and runs. The next morning, Charles Pennington, April O’Neil’s boss, visits her Greenwich Village apartment to discuss assigning her a guard at night. Accompanying Charles is his troubled teenage son, Danny Pennington, who steals money ... +


New York City television reporter April O'Neil covers a wave of robberies, and as she leaves the station at night, young thugs attack her. Lights on the street suddenly go dark. By the time police arrive, the delinquents have been tied up and April sits stunned. Seeing a dagger laying on the pavement, she slides it into her purse. In a sewer beneath the city, four teenage mutant ninja turtles—Raphael, Michaelangelo, Donatello, and Leonardo—“high-five” each other to celebrate their vigilante mission as they return to their underground lair. They inform “Master Splinter,” a four-foot-high rat, that all went well, but Splinter is concerned whether any humans saw them. When Raphael wants to go back and retrieve his sai, a Japanese dagger, Splinter tells him to forget it. Michaelangelo orders pizza on a pay telephone. They skateboard through the sewer to a street grate, where a pizza deliveryman makes the exchange of money for food through the bars. Raphael dons a Fedora hat and trench coat and ventures out to see a movie. Seeing a purse snatching, he knocks down the two juvenile delinquents and tosses the purse back to its owner. As the gangsters run into a park, Casey Jones, a young crime fighter wearing a hockey mask, gives chase and delivers a beating with his hockey stick. When Raphael interrupts and allows the teenagers to escape, Jones hits Raphael with a cricket bat and runs. The next morning, Charles Pennington, April O’Neil’s boss, visits her Greenwich Village apartment to discuss assigning her a guard at night. Accompanying Charles is his troubled teenage son, Danny Pennington, who steals money from April’s billfold. Later, April asks Police Chief Sterns on television what he is doing to stop “The Foot” gang’s crime wave, but the chief denies that such an the organization exists. Watching the program, the turtles recognize April as the victim they saved, and Raphael develops a crush on her; elsewhere, another viewer, “The Shredder,” leader of The Foot, smashes the television screen and orders his minions to seek revenge. When April leaves the police station, a protective Raphael follows her into the subway. Several masked Japanese ninjas from The Foot accost her, and as April pulls out the dagger, they knock it away and slug her. Raphael retrieves his lost sai, beats up the ninjas, and carries the unconscious April to the lair. A member of The Foot follows to discover where he lives. When April awakens, she screams at the strange-looking creatures, but Splinter calms her by explaining their origins: Fifteen years ago, Splinter was the pet rat of Japanese ninja master Yoshi. From his cage, Splinter mimicked Yoshi’s movements and learned the secret art of ninja. Arriving on his own in New York City, Splinter wandered the sewers until he found four baby turtles crawling around an oozing canister of radioactive material. He gathered up the turtles for safekeeping, and soon realized that the radiation had mutated all of them, including himself. Splinter and the turtles grew physically and intellectually. Splinter gave them names of Renaissance painters and taught them everything he had learned from Yoshi. Now that April is an ally, Splinter tells the turtles to accompany her back to her apartment. She invites them in for pizza, and by the time they return home, the lair has been torn apart and Splinter is gone. They go back to spend the night at April’s. In the morning, Chief Sterns telephones Charles Pennington to inform him that his son, Danny, was arrested for theft. Charles picks up the boy from jail, then goes to April’s apartment and orders her to drop The Foot story. The turtles hide, but Danny sees one under a table. As they leave, Charles berates his son for being a thief, and Danny runs away to a warehouse where The Foot’s Master Tatsu trains teenage runaways in martial arts. At the sound of a gong, the youth gather to await Shredder, a Japanese ninja who arrives wearing ancient Japanese armor. Shredder bestows a Foot mask on a young fighter as a sign of honor, and reminds the teenagers, including Danny, that the clan is now their family because the outside world rejected them. He warns of a new enemy, four “freaks of nature” that have interfered with clan business and must be punished. Danny raises his hand and informs Shredder where to find them. Nearby, Splinter is held captive in chains. Meanwhile, April explains to a television news anchor that local Japanese-Americans told her the New York crime wave reminds them of a group of thieves in Japan called The Foot, but despite her attempts to inform Chief Sterns, he refuses to take her seriously. In the next room, Charles Pennington gets a screaming telephone call from the chief, demanding that April be silenced. Meanwhile, at April’s apartment, the turtles argue and Raphael goes to the roof to be alone. Casey Jones spots him from another roof. Dozens of ninjas from The Foot surround Raphael and toss him through a skylight into April’s apartment. As the fight continues, April’s floor collapses under the weight, dropping everyone into a shop on the first floor. Casey Jones arrives in his hockey mask and joins the fray. A fire starts, and April leads the turtles and Casey through a trap door. As the building burns, Danny Pennington watches with a sorrowful look. Back at the warehouse, Shredder beats Splinter, demanding to know who the turtles are, and Tatsu takes out his rage on the teenagers. Regretful of his decision to join The Foot, Danny visits Splinter. The rat makes an emotional connection with the misunderstood young man and assures him that his father does not hate him. Meanwhile, April, Casey, and the turtles escape New York City in her van and regroup in her family’s old farmhouse. April is concerned about the turtles and their loss of Splinter. One day, during meditation, Leonardo makes a psychic connection to Splinter and runs to the others to announce their master is alive. That night, their campfire flares, and Splinter’s spirit arises from the flames. He compliments them on realizing that the ultimate mastery is of the mind, not the body, and encourages them to persevere together. The turtles, Casey, and April return to the city in the old pickup truck, park at a manhole cover, and go into the sewers. At the lair, they find Danny Pennington, who has run away from The Foot. Feeling claustrophobic, Casey goes above ground to sleep in the truck. As Danny sleeps that night, he hears Splinter’s voice assuring him that fathers love their sons. He awakens and leaves the lair, and Casey follows. Danny sneaks into the warehouse, finds Splinter, and laments that he no longer has a family. Splinter commiserates by telling the teenager about his own lost family. His master, Yoshi, was one of Japan’s finest shadow warriors, whose only equal was Oruku Sakai. They were also rivals for the love of the same woman, Tang Shin. When she wedded Toshi and ran away with him to America, Sakai followed. He killed Tang Shin, and then Yoshi, and in the struggle Splinter’s cage broke open, allowing him to escape. Danny asks what happened to Oruku Sakai. Splinter does not know, but informs Danny that he is wearing Sakai’s symbol on his Foot Clan headband. Danny rips off the headband and throws it down. Just then, Shredder enters, demands to know what Danny is doing there, and sees the headband on the floor. He tells Tatsu to round up the others for an attack on the turtles, and orders him to kill the rat. However, Casey Jones, dressed in a black Foot mask, has infiltrated the warehouse and found Danny, who leads him to Splinter. As they free Splinter from his chains, Tatsu and the delinquents surround them. Casey knocks Tatsu unconscious with a golf club, and he and Splinter convince the teenagers to leave The Foot because Shredder is exploiting them. Elsewhere, a fight between The Foot and the ninja turtles ensues on a building roof, and the turtles vanquish their foes. When Splinter arrives, reveals that he was Master Yoshi’s pet rat, and exposes Sakai’s murderous crimes, Shredder attacks him, but he is tossed off the roof into a trash compactor that Casey Jones has backed up against the building below. Casey punches a button and crushes him. Police arrive with Charles Pennington. Danny returns April’s money and apologizes to his father. Charles offers April higher pay and a corner office. The youths inform Chief Sterns where to find the stolen goods from the crime wave, and Casey and April reconcile with a kiss. The turtles celebrate with Splinter.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.