Five Corners (1988)

R | 92 mins | Comedy-drama, Mystery | 22 January 1988

Director:

Tony Bill

Cinematographer:

Fred Murphy

Editor:

Andy Blumenthal

Production Designer:

Adrianne Lobel

Production Company:

Handmade Films
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HISTORY

The 9 Nov 1985 Screen International reported that principal photography was set to begin on 3 Mar 1986. However, after that date passed, the 21 Mar 1986 Daily News announced a Jul 1986 start date. Production finally got underway two months later, on 8 Sep 1986 in New York City, as noted in the 14 Oct 1986 HR production chart. Production notes in AMPAS library files report that the majority of filming occurred in and around Astoria Park in Queens. Additional Manhattan locations include: an abandoned police precinct; the Toy Center Building; the Market Diner; the Canal Street subway station; and Vazak's Bar. Filming was completed at the end of Oct 1986 after forty-four days. The 15 Oct 1986 Var noted a $5 million budget.
       According to the 14 Oct 1987 LAHExam, writer John Patrick Shanley had asked critics John Simon and Mel Gussow, as well as other “prominent drama critics,” to appear in the picture as the character “Mr. Glascow.” However, the role was played by actor-stuntman Jerry Hewitt.
       The 20 May 1987 Var review noted that the picture was shown on 13 May 1987 in Cannes, France, as a part of the Cannes Film Market.
       An article in the 13 Nov 1986 DV announced a summer 1987 release date. However, by the summer of 1987, the 13 Aug 1987 LAT reported the release was set for Sep 1987, and the 14 Oct 1987 LAHExam noted an anticipated opening in Nov 1987. After several delays, the picture finally opened on 22 Jan ... More Less

The 9 Nov 1985 Screen International reported that principal photography was set to begin on 3 Mar 1986. However, after that date passed, the 21 Mar 1986 Daily News announced a Jul 1986 start date. Production finally got underway two months later, on 8 Sep 1986 in New York City, as noted in the 14 Oct 1986 HR production chart. Production notes in AMPAS library files report that the majority of filming occurred in and around Astoria Park in Queens. Additional Manhattan locations include: an abandoned police precinct; the Toy Center Building; the Market Diner; the Canal Street subway station; and Vazak's Bar. Filming was completed at the end of Oct 1986 after forty-four days. The 15 Oct 1986 Var noted a $5 million budget.
       According to the 14 Oct 1987 LAHExam, writer John Patrick Shanley had asked critics John Simon and Mel Gussow, as well as other “prominent drama critics,” to appear in the picture as the character “Mr. Glascow.” However, the role was played by actor-stuntman Jerry Hewitt.
       The 20 May 1987 Var review noted that the picture was shown on 13 May 1987 in Cannes, France, as a part of the Cannes Film Market.
       An article in the 13 Nov 1986 DV announced a summer 1987 release date. However, by the summer of 1987, the 13 Aug 1987 LAT reported the release was set for Sep 1987, and the 14 Oct 1987 LAHExam noted an anticipated opening in Nov 1987. After several delays, the picture finally opened on 22 Jan 1988, according to the NYT review from the same date.
       End credits state: “Special thanks to: The Mayor’s Office of The City of New York; the Movie and Television Unit of the New York City Police Department; Yonkers Raceway; Doug Buttleman and Yamaha International; Henry Glover; Martin Nugiel; Michael Ochs; Taggart Driving School; Hy Weiss; Vince Zabaly; Jo Campagna; Jack Gilford; Irving Ong; Sarah Wheaton; Matt Saver; Ken Meyer; and all at 26 Cadogan Square.” End credits also state: “Many thanks to the penguins in this film. They were treated most respectfully and no harm came to them in their work.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily News
21 Mar 1986.
---
Daily Variety
13 Nov 1986
p. 1, 14.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Oct 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 1987
p. 3, 17.
LAHExam
14 Oct 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
2 Jan 1987
Calendar, p. 1, 8.
Los Angeles Times
13 Aug 1987
Calendar, p. 5.
Los Angeles Times
22 Jan 1988
Calendar, p. 12.
New York Times
22 Jan 1988
Section C, p. 18.
Screen International
9 Sep 1985.
---
Screen International
27 Sep 1986
pp. 14-15.
Variety
15 Oct 1986
p. 16.
Variety
20 May 1987
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Handmade Films Presents
A Tony Bill Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Asst unit prod mgr
Addl 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Gaffer
Best boy
Elec
Key grip
Best boy
Dolly grip
Rigging gaffer
Rigging grip
Steadicam op
Cam op
Cam op
Steadicam asst
Cam asst
Cam asst
Cam equip by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst to the prod des
Story board artist
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Set dresser
Prop master
Prop asst
Const coord
Master scenic artist
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Ward asst
MUSIC
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Score prod by
Score prod by
Score eng by
Asst eng
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Post prod facilities
Sd services
Foley sd eff
Foley sd eff
Syncher
Sd transfers by
Sd transfers by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff asst
Opticals & titles by
Optical line up
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod auditor
Loc coord
Scr supv
Asst to Tony Bill
Asst to the prod
Prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Promotions coord
Asst loc coord
Asst prod accountant
Transportation coord
Asst transportation coord
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Los Angeles casting
Extras casting
Extras casting
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Period cars by
Period car coord
Craftservices
Parking coord
Parking coord
Dog handler
Penguins supplied by
Penguin handler
Loc equip by
Catering by
Pub consultants
STAND INS
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
SONGS
“In My Life,” words and music by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, © 1965 Northern Songs, used by permission, performed by The Beatles, ℗
1965 original song recording made by EMI Records Ltd.
“The Times They Are A-Changin’,” words and music by Bob Dylan, published by Warner Bros., music performed by Bob Dylan, master courtesy by Bob Dylan and CBS Records
+
SONGS
“In My Life,” words and music by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, © 1965 Northern Songs, used by permission, performed by The Beatles, ℗
1965 original song recording made by EMI Records Ltd.
“The Times They Are A-Changin’,” words and music by Bob Dylan, published by Warner Bros., music performed by Bob Dylan, master courtesy by Bob Dylan and CBS Records
“Lakmé,” by Delibes, performed by L’Orchestre National de l'Opera de Monte Carlo, conducted by Richard Bonynge, with Joan Sutherland, recording courtesy of Decca Record Company Limited, catalogue number set 488
“Let The Little Girl Dance,” words and music by Glover – Spencer, performed by Billy Bland, master courtesy of Old Town Record Corp.
“Uh Uh Uh,” words and music by Robbie Robertson, performed by The Canadian Squires, courtesy of Henry Glover
“Funky Soul,” words and music by Richard Thomas, performed by Richard Thomas, courtesy of Henry Glover
“Leave Me Alone,” words and music by Robbie Robertson, performed by The Canadian Squires, courtesy of Henry Glover.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 January 1988
Premiere Information:
Cannes Film Marchket: 13 May 1987
Los Angeles and New York openings: 22 January 1988
Production Date:
8 September--late October 1986
Copyright Claimant:
Paragon Entertainment Corporation
Copyright Date:
1 July 1996
Copyright Number:
PA0000831086
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
92
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28571
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1964, high school Algebra teacher Mr. Glascow is killed in the “Five Corners” neighborhood of the Bronx, New York City, when he is shot in the back with an arrow. As police detectives Sullivan and Mazola investigate the murder, Heinz Sabantino is released from prison after serving time for the attempted rape of woman named Linda. He returns to the neighborhood and moves in with his mother. The following morning, Linda’s boyfriend, James, tells her that Heinz is back and offers to protect her. Linda dismisses James, reminding him that their friend, Harry Fitzgerald, was the one who saved her after James was severely beaten by Heinz. Linda seeks out Harry to ask for his protection again, but he has since become a pacifist and forgiven Heinz. He assures Linda that she can telephone him if she needs help. However, he plans to leave for Mississippi shortly to register African American voters in Mississippi. Meanwhile, neighborhood toughs Castro and Willie spend the day with two girls, Melanie and Brita, after school is cancelled because of Mr. Glascow’s death. Sometime later, Heinz Sabantino telephones Linda and asks her to meet him in the park. After agreeing, Linda telephones Harry to ask him to escort her. When he is not home, she leaves a message with his mother, and goes to the park alone. Before approaching Heinz, she picks up a large stick to use as protection. Heinz greets Linda and gives her two penguins he stole from the zoo. Linda insists the birds be returned, and her rejection angers Heinz, prompting him to grab Linda’s stick and bludgeon one of ... +


In 1964, high school Algebra teacher Mr. Glascow is killed in the “Five Corners” neighborhood of the Bronx, New York City, when he is shot in the back with an arrow. As police detectives Sullivan and Mazola investigate the murder, Heinz Sabantino is released from prison after serving time for the attempted rape of woman named Linda. He returns to the neighborhood and moves in with his mother. The following morning, Linda’s boyfriend, James, tells her that Heinz is back and offers to protect her. Linda dismisses James, reminding him that their friend, Harry Fitzgerald, was the one who saved her after James was severely beaten by Heinz. Linda seeks out Harry to ask for his protection again, but he has since become a pacifist and forgiven Heinz. He assures Linda that she can telephone him if she needs help. However, he plans to leave for Mississippi shortly to register African American voters in Mississippi. Meanwhile, neighborhood toughs Castro and Willie spend the day with two girls, Melanie and Brita, after school is cancelled because of Mr. Glascow’s death. Sometime later, Heinz Sabantino telephones Linda and asks her to meet him in the park. After agreeing, Linda telephones Harry to ask him to escort her. When he is not home, she leaves a message with his mother, and goes to the park alone. Before approaching Heinz, she picks up a large stick to use as protection. Heinz greets Linda and gives her two penguins he stole from the zoo. Linda insists the birds be returned, and her rejection angers Heinz, prompting him to grab Linda’s stick and bludgeon one of the penguins to death. Horrified, Linda takes the other penguin and flees. She seeks out her boyfriend, James, at the bar where he works and asks him to take care of the bird. After placing the penguin in water, James walks Linda to the subway station. However, Heinz appears and kidnaps her. Meanwhile, Harry learns about Linda’s meeting with Heinz and asks detectives Sullivan and Mazola to help him find her in the park. After finding the dead penguin, they return to the police station, where James arrives and tells them that Linda has been kidnapped. Harry enlists the help of his Saint Bernard, “The Buddha,” to track Linda from the scent of her sweater. The dog leads them to Heinz, who is found hotwiring a taxicab. Heinz disarms Mazola and kills the officer before driving away. Returning to his mother’s apartment, Heinz asks her to stop pretending he is a good person, and she agrees. Relieved, Heinz hugs his mother, before throwing her out the window. Harry, Sullivan, and James arrive to find Mrs. Sabantino dead on the sidewalk. As Sullivan calls for backup, James and Harry follow Heinz, who is carrying the unconscious Linda to the roof. Harry pleads with Heinz to surrender peacefully, but he refuses. When Linda regains consciousness, she runs to James, as Harry attacks Heinz. Suddenly, hooligans Castro and Willie appear, shoot Heinz in the back with an arrow, and he falls over the ledge to this death. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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