Tune in Tomorrow... (1990)

PG-13 | 105 mins | Romance, Screwball comedy | 26 October 1990

Full page view
HISTORY

Actor Henry Gibson, portraying radio announcer “Big John Coot,” reads opening credits, including names of twenty-two actors. Title cards introduce two scenes at the beginning of the film: “Detroit – 1951” and “New Orleans - 6 months later.” Written credits do not appear until the end. They contain the following information: “This film was shot entirely on location in Wilmington, North Carolina, New Orleans, Louisiana, and Paris, France.”
       The “soap opera” Kings of the Garden District is a story within the story. The film actors who portray WXBU radio actors voicing the characters in the program are different than the film actors who portray the soap opera characters as seen on the screen. For example, the fictional character “Richard Quince” is voiced on radio by Leonard Pando, but seen by the audience as Peter Gallagher.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, as well as the 25 Aug 1989 DV, Tune in Tomorrow… began principal photography 15 Aug 1989 at the Carolco Studio in Wilmington, NC, where the WXBU radio studio and a New Orleans café were built. An outdoor scene of the “Quince” family’s wedding was also filmed at the Orton Plantation south of Wilmington. However, Hurricane Hugo, one of the most powerful hurricanes on record, interrupted filming and blew down many of the sets. Rather than rebuild, producers moved the film to New Orleans, LA, where some scenes had already been scheduled. The 2 Nov 1989 HR noted that filming was completed.
       The budget was set at $11 million, according to the 15 Sep 1989 DV.
       The 21 Oct 1990 NYT noted ... More Less

Actor Henry Gibson, portraying radio announcer “Big John Coot,” reads opening credits, including names of twenty-two actors. Title cards introduce two scenes at the beginning of the film: “Detroit – 1951” and “New Orleans - 6 months later.” Written credits do not appear until the end. They contain the following information: “This film was shot entirely on location in Wilmington, North Carolina, New Orleans, Louisiana, and Paris, France.”
       The “soap opera” Kings of the Garden District is a story within the story. The film actors who portray WXBU radio actors voicing the characters in the program are different than the film actors who portray the soap opera characters as seen on the screen. For example, the fictional character “Richard Quince” is voiced on radio by Leonard Pando, but seen by the audience as Peter Gallagher.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, as well as the 25 Aug 1989 DV, Tune in Tomorrow… began principal photography 15 Aug 1989 at the Carolco Studio in Wilmington, NC, where the WXBU radio studio and a New Orleans café were built. An outdoor scene of the “Quince” family’s wedding was also filmed at the Orton Plantation south of Wilmington. However, Hurricane Hugo, one of the most powerful hurricanes on record, interrupted filming and blew down many of the sets. Rather than rebuild, producers moved the film to New Orleans, LA, where some scenes had already been scheduled. The 2 Nov 1989 HR noted that filming was completed.
       The budget was set at $11 million, according to the 15 Sep 1989 DV.
       The 21 Oct 1990 NYT noted that the cast rehearsed for two weeks in the Wilmington, NC, studio before filming began. Choreographer Quinny Sacks worked with Keanu Reeves and Barbara Hershey an hour each day, instructing them on “the intricacies of the jitterbug,” in order to turn the actors from “stumbling neophytes” into an “erotic twosome.”
       The 26 Oct 1990 NYT review notes that Mario Vargas Llosa’s novel, Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter, took place in Lima, Peru, and that the character of “Pedro Carmichael,” played by Peter Falk in the film, was originally a Bolivian named “Pedro Camacho” who hated Argentines, not Albanians. The 14 Aug 1990 DV noted that the title was briefly Tune in Tomorrow …for the Scandalous Adventures of Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter. The film was released outside the U.S. under the novel’s original title. Explaining why producers changed the title for American audiences, director Jon Amiel told the 2 Nov 1990 Edmonton Journal, “When we showed the film to 2,000 people in a test market situation, we were shocked to find out that only three people had ever heard of the novel,…and none of them had ever read it.” Also, according to the 28 Oct 1990 Orange County Register, distributor Cinecom wanted to promote “the movie’s slapstick comedy over its romantic elements” in order to attract young men rather than older women. However, upon the film’s release, the 26 Nov 1990 Var deemed it “a sophisticated romantic comedy more attuned to specialized audiences than the company’s target of young males.”
       The 22 Aug 1990 Toronto Star announced the film’s “world premiere” closing night of the Toronto Film Festival 15 Sep 1990. Audiences at the Deauville American Film Festival in France picked it as their favorite American film of 1990, the 12 Sep 1990 Globe and Mail reported.
       Acknowledgments include the following: “The producers wish to thank the City of Wilmington, North Carolina; The Cafe Atlantique; The North Carolina Film Commission; The Louisiana Film Commission; Earl; All Acts of God; North Carolina State Parks; Orton Plantation; The Sprunt Family; Billy Banks; Stephanie Samuel; John Toomey; Liz Schoenberg.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Sep 1989
p. 24
Daily Variety
14 Aug 1989
p. 2
Daily Variety
25 Aug 1989
p. 16
Daily Variety
31 Aug 1990
p. 2, 13
Edmonton Journal [Alberta, Canada]
2 Nov 1990
Section C, p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jul 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Aug 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Nov 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Sep 1990
p. 6, 14
LAHExam
19 Sep 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
21 May 1989
Calendar, p. 30
Los Angeles Times
2 Nov 1990
Calendar, p. 8
New York Times
21 Oct 1990
Section A, p. 15
New York Times
26 Oct 1990
p. 8
Orange County Register
28 Oct 1990
Section L, p. 10
Publishers Weekly
4 Feb 1983.
---
The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
12 Sep 1990
Section C, p. 6
Toronto Star
22 Aug 1990
Section B, p. 1
Variety
3 Sep 1990
pp. 75-76
Variety
26 Nov 1990
p. 73
WSJ
6 Nov 1987
p. 1
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
and
as Big John Coot
Soap opera players:
The Wynton Marsalis Band:
The Neville Brothers:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Cinecom Entertainment Group presents
In association with Odyssey/Cinecom International
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Cam loader
Still photog
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Elec
Generator op
Rigging gaffer
Rigging elec
Best boy grip
Grip
2d cam op, New Orleans
2d cam asst, New Orleans
Gaffer, New Orleans
Best boy, New Orleans
Elec, New Orleans
Elec, New Orleans
Elec, New Orleans
Elec, New Orleans
Generator op, New Orleans
Key grip, New Orleans
Dolly grip, New Orleans
Grip, New Orleans
Grip, New Orleans
Grip, New Orleans
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Story board artist
Prod des, New Orleans
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
1st asst ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
2d asst ed
Apprentice ed
Post prod supv
Negative matching
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Stand by props
Props asst
Set dressing leadman
Set dressing buyer
Stand by dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Const coord
Const foreman
Const purchaser
Const runner
Lead carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Scenic chargeman
Lead painter
Stand by painter
Sign painter
Leadman, New Orleans
Set dresser, New Orleans
Swing gang, New Orleans
Prop master, New Orleans
Props asst, New Orleans
Lead carpenter, New Orleans
Scenic artist, New Orleans
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Set costumer
Asst set costumer
Asst costumer
Set costumer, New Orleans
Wardrobe asst, New Orleans
Wardrobe asst, New Orleans
Wardrobe asst, New Orleans
MUSIC
Mus comp by
Mus supv
Mus project mgr
Mus prod
Mus orch
Mus contractor
Mus rec eng
Mus rec eng
Mus archivist
Wynton Marsalis appears courtesy of
[Clarinetist] Addl featured musician for Wynton Ma
[Percussionist] Addl featured musician for Wynton
[Saxophonist] Addl featured musician for Wynton Ma
[Tuba player, baritone saxophonist] Addl featured
[Organist], Addl featured musician for Wynton Mars
[Baritone saxophonist] Addl featured musician for
AMG management
The Neville Brothers appear courtesy of
Bill Graham Management
Shirley Horn appears courtesy of
Mus mixing studio
SOUND
Sd mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Asst sd ed
Asst ADR ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff photog
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Key make up artist
Make up artist
Addl make up
Addl make up
Key hair stylist
Hair stylist
Addl hair
Addl hair
Addl hair
Make up, New Orleans
Make up, New Orleans
Hair, New Orleans
Hair, New Orleans
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Loc asst
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Accounting asst
Accounting asst
Post prod services
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Picture car mechanic
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Casting assoc
Extras casting
Extras casting associate
Unit pub
Prod counsel
Dialect coach
Dialect coach
Asst to the prod
Asst to the prod
Ket set prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Caterer, Sunrise Catering
Caterer, Sunrise Catering
Craft service
Craft service
Animal wrangler
Prod secy, New Orleans
Loc scout, New Orleans
Picture car coord, New Orleans
Transportation coord, New Orleans
Transportation capt, New Orleans
Extras casting, New Orleans
Prod asst, New Orleans
Prod asst, New Orleans
Prod asst, New Orleans
Prod asst, New Orleans
Caterer, New Orleans
Caterer, Location Catering Services, New Orleans
Dailies adv
Prod financing furnished by
Completion bond furnished by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter by Mario Vargas Llosa (New York, 1982).
SONGS
"Chewin' Fat," written by Wynton Marsalis, performed by Wynton Marsalis and His Band, featuring Johnny Adams
"Wedding Samba," written by Abraham Ellstein, Allan Small, Joseph Liebowitz, performed by Don Jacobi and The College Allstars, courtesy of PolyGram Special Products, a Division of PolyGram Records, Inc., Duchess Music Corporation (BMI)
"Sunsetting In The Bayou," written by Wynton Marsalis, performed by Wynton Marsalis and His Band
+
SONGS
"Chewin' Fat," written by Wynton Marsalis, performed by Wynton Marsalis and His Band, featuring Johnny Adams
"Wedding Samba," written by Abraham Ellstein, Allan Small, Joseph Liebowitz, performed by Don Jacobi and The College Allstars, courtesy of PolyGram Special Products, a Division of PolyGram Records, Inc., Duchess Music Corporation (BMI)
"Sunsetting In The Bayou," written by Wynton Marsalis, performed by Wynton Marsalis and His Band
"Mama Leona," written by Wynton Marsalis, performed by Wynton Marsalis and His Band
"I Can't Get Started," written by Vernon Duke & Ira Gershwin, performed by Wynton Marsalis and His Band, featuring Shirley Horn, Chappell & Co. ASCAP
"Uptown Top Table Tap," written by Wynton Marsalis, performed by Wynton Marsalis and His Band
"Second Second Line (Hot Hoppin'), written by Wynton Marsalis, performed by Wynton Marsalis and His Band
"Crescent City Crawl," written by Wynton Marsalis, performed by Wynton Marsalis and His Band
"New Orleans My Home (Going Back To New Orleans)," written by Ellis Walsh, performed by The Neville Brothers, courtesy of A & M Records, Inc., Cherie Corp. (BMI)
"It's A Good Day," written by Peggy Lee & Dave Barbour, performed by Peggy Lee, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with Cema Special Markets, Michael H. Goldsen, Inc. ASCAP
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter
Tune in Tommorrow ... For the Scandalous Adventures of Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter
Release Date:
26 October 1990
Premiere Information:
Toronto Film Festival premiere: 15 September 1990
Los Angeles opening: 26 October 1990
New York opening: week of 26 October 1990
Production Date:
15 August - late October 1989
Copyright Claimant:
Cinecom Entertainment Group, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 March 1993
Copyright Number:
PA618954
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses & Panaflex Camera by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
105
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30700
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On May 10, 1951, at radio station WEQT in Detroit, Michigan, producer Victor receives a telephone threat that a bomb is set to detonate in the studio. Everyone runs except a writer, who keeps typing. After the bomb explodes, a dark figure walks away. Six months later, at WXBU in New Orleans, Louisiana, general manager Sam O’Grady informs news writer Martin Loader that he hired a well-known dramatic writer, Pedro Carmichael, to take over the radio station’s failing soap opera, Kings of the Garden District, a saga of the wealthy Quince family. Martin drives to the train depot to pick up his Aunt Julia, who is returning home after years in New York City. Julia confesses to Martin that she dislikes men, but needs to find another rich husband as soon as possible. He leaves her with his Uncle Luke and Aunt Olga Loader’s house. Later, at a welcome home party, Julia wards off several men by telling them she has a movie date with Martin, her young nephew. At WXBU, Martin objects to Pedro Carmichael hogging the newsroom typewriter, and when the older man provokes a fight, Martin knocks him down. Sam O’Grady threatens to fire Martin, but Carmichael defends the young man and claims they are friends. Carmichael spices up the daily soap opera: Elmore Dubuque’s marriage to Elena Quince breaks the heart of her brother, Richard Quince, who tells Uncle Albert Quince that he loves Elena not as a sister, but a woman. Listeners all over New Orleans are spellbound. Carmichael invites Martin to a café, but when the young ... +


On May 10, 1951, at radio station WEQT in Detroit, Michigan, producer Victor receives a telephone threat that a bomb is set to detonate in the studio. Everyone runs except a writer, who keeps typing. After the bomb explodes, a dark figure walks away. Six months later, at WXBU in New Orleans, Louisiana, general manager Sam O’Grady informs news writer Martin Loader that he hired a well-known dramatic writer, Pedro Carmichael, to take over the radio station’s failing soap opera, Kings of the Garden District, a saga of the wealthy Quince family. Martin drives to the train depot to pick up his Aunt Julia, who is returning home after years in New York City. Julia confesses to Martin that she dislikes men, but needs to find another rich husband as soon as possible. He leaves her with his Uncle Luke and Aunt Olga Loader’s house. Later, at a welcome home party, Julia wards off several men by telling them she has a movie date with Martin, her young nephew. At WXBU, Martin objects to Pedro Carmichael hogging the newsroom typewriter, and when the older man provokes a fight, Martin knocks him down. Sam O’Grady threatens to fire Martin, but Carmichael defends the young man and claims they are friends. Carmichael spices up the daily soap opera: Elmore Dubuque’s marriage to Elena Quince breaks the heart of her brother, Richard Quince, who tells Uncle Albert Quince that he loves Elena not as a sister, but a woman. Listeners all over New Orleans are spellbound. Carmichael invites Martin to a café, but when the young man claims he would “kind of like” to be a fiction writer, Carmichael mocks him for not being serious enough. Martin later meets Aunt Julia for dinner, but she is with Brent Maconnochie, a wealthy but stodgy bachelor. Martin asks Julia to dance, and chides her for dating dull men, but she likes dull men because they behave themselves. In the soap opera, Elena Quince Dubuque confesses to Uncle Albert that she is pregnant with her brother Richard’s baby. Martin Loader takes flowers to Julia and kisses her. When she reminds him that she is his aunt, Martin reminds Julia in turn that she is not his blood relative, but rather the sister of his Uncle Luke Loader’s wife. Furthermore, the fact that Julia is thirty-six and Martin only twenty-one does not faze him. Julia agrees to accompany him that evening to a jazz club. The next day, they fish on the Gulf of Mexico, and Martin declares he is going to write a book called My Aunt Julia. At the radio station, Carmichael gives the actors a pep talk about putting more emotion into their work. He pulls aside the middle-aged Leonard Pando, the voice of young “Richard Quince,” and suggests he relax by masturbating before the program. In the soap opera, the broken-hearted Richard Quince elects to live as a monk at Father Serafim’s leper colony. Meanwhile, his father, vermin extermination king Robert E. Quince, confesses to Father Serafim that when he was a child looking after his infant sister, she was killed by rats, and that is why he dedicated his life to eradicating vermin, as well as Albanians. Elena Quince visits her brother at the leper colony, and despite Richard’s vow of chastity, they proclaim their love. In the studio, actor Leonard Pando’s vocal performance is more emotional than ever as he pulls the equally middle-aged actress portraying Elena to the floor, requiring Carmichael to follow them with the microphone. Afterward, a glowing Leonard thanks Carmichael for the advice. After seeing An American in Paris at a movie theater, Martin takes Julia to a soda shop and confesses his dream to live in Paris, but Ernest Hemingway’s Paris, not Hollywood’s. Imagining a magic moment at a Parisian café, he includes Julia in his reverie and she is briefly carried away. However, she snaps out of it and brings Martin back to reality. Pedro Carmichael joins them, but Julia has to rush off. The old writer congratulates Martin on his taste in women. As they leave, several Albanians accost Carmichael because of his constant allusions to Albanians as goat farmers and worse on Kings of the Garden District. The Albanians hurry away as a police siren approaches. The next day, Albanians picket the radio station. Sid O’Grady, the other half of general manager Sam O’Grady’s split personality, tells Martin he is getting complaints from the Albanian community, but the soap opera’s audience has increased 183%, so what can he do? When Martin suggests that Carmichael “go easy” on Albanians, the writer insists that audiences need to hate somebody because it adds to the “impact of reality.” Carmichael invites Martin and Julia to his house for dinner that evening, and when they arrive, the host is dressed as a maid and wears a wig. He gives a dramatic display of dusting that, he claims, is supposed to show years of drudgery raising nine children. After serving wine, Carmichael shows them food in the kitchen and leaves. Martin professes his love to Julia, and she claims she does not want to hurt him. As they argue, Carmichael lurks outside, recording their conversation. He turns it into dialogue for Kings of the Garden District. When Martin goes to Aunt Olga’s house to see Julia, he discovers her with a new man, Dr. Ted Orson. Julia later telephones to explain, and when Martin hangs up, she hurries to the radio station to order him to never hang up on her again. As they argue, Carmichael takes notes outside the door. Listening to the soap opera while driving home, Martin recognizes the dialogue and hurries back to confront Carmichael. He challenges the writer’s right to commandeer his conversations, but Carmichael counters that Martin, like everyone else, gets his words and emotions from writers, and he is simply recycling them. As a peace gesture, Carmichael gives Martin two tickets to a jazz nightclub. However, Carmichael also telephones Aunt Olga and tells her that she and her husband won complimentary WXBU tickets to the club. When Uncle Luke and Aunt Olga arrive, Julia panics, grabs Martin, and scurries out the back door. Martin carries her to a romantic spot on the river and kisses her, The next day, Julia telephones Martin at the station to inform him that his parents, Donald and Frances Loader, and the rest of the family are aware of their affair and have branded her a “fallen woman.” Martin’s father, a deputy sheriff, suddenly arrives, hits him, and threatens to jail Julia on a “morals bust.” He tells his son that Luke and Olga are ready to throw her out of their house. Nearby, as Carmichael listens in, he is worried about where to take this new twist in the story. He talks Martin into asking Julia to marry him, then drives them to a remote church on the bayou. On the way, Julia warns Martin that when he reaches her current age, she will be over fifty. Regardless, Martin professes his love, so Julia offers a five-year marriage deal, which will give Martin enough time to get tired of her, but leave her young enough to find a rich older man. During the wedding ceremony, Martin realizes the preacher is Leonard Pando in costume and unmasks him. Julia runs from the church and steals Carmichael’s car. Martin jumps on Leonard Pando’s motorcycle and chases her, yelling that he had nothing to do with the ruse. As Julia packs her belongings, Olga Loader begs her to remain in New Orleans and to promise Martin’s parents she will stay away from him, but Julia is determined to leave. Later, Martin sees Julia with Dr. Orson. He tries to intervene, but Orson knocks him down and drives away with Julia. Meanwhile, Sam O’Grady informs Carmichael that his (imaginary) brother, Sid, promised local Albanians that there will be no more Albanian insults and jokes on Kings of the Garden District. As the program begins with new, inoffensive dialogue, Carmichael thanks the actors and leaves. He telephones Martin, gives him the address of Ted Orson’s townhouse, and pulls the radio station fire alarm, forcing an evacuation. Carmichael stays behind and takes over the microphone. Serving as a narrator, he uses various voices to wrap up the story. Richard Quince dresses as a doctor to attend his baby’s birth. Uncle Albert Quince confesses that he, not Richard, is the father of Elena Quince because of his affair with his brother’s wife, Margaret Quince. That means Elena and Richard are cousins, not siblings. However, more story twists reveal that Elena and Richard are not even cousins. Kings of the Garden District ends as Albanians rape a German shepherd dog outside the hospital, and Elmore Dubuque shoots Albert and Margaret. Real Albanians set the radio station afire, and Martin decides to shoot Julia and Dr. Orson. However, when Martin finds Julia sitting in Carmichael’s car, she is alone. She explains that when Martin saw her with Dr. Orson that afternoon, she was saying goodbye. Julia and Martin climb into the back seat and make love. Afterward, Martin insists they are getting married and going to France. A stolen fire truck pulls alongside and Carmichael wishes them luck. He is leaving to write for television in New York, and confesses to being half-Albanian. As Carmichael drives away, the soap opera cast stands on the back of the fire truck, waving goodbye to Martin and Julia. Later, the couple embrace on a tour boat in the reflection of Paris's Eiffel Tower. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.