Career Opportunities (1991)

PG-13 | 83 mins | Comedy | 29 March 1991

Director:

Bryan Gordon

Writer:

John Hughes

Cinematographer:

Don McAlpine

Production Designer:

Paul Sylbert

Production Company:

Hughes Entertainment
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HISTORY

The 17 Sep 1989 LAT announced the picture as director Bryan Gordon’s theatrical feature debut. On 13 Nov 1989, DV reported the start of principal photography that day in Atlanta, GA. The 17 Nov 1989 HR estimated a seven-week production schedule.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, filmmaker John Hughes, along with Bryan Gordon and producer A. Hunt Lowry, chose the rural town of Monroe, GA, following a nationwide search for a suitable location. For the department store set, Target Corporation provided a newly-renovated store near Atlanta, GA. The crew created another department store set within the existing store, and included a “Garden of Eden,” designed for the emotional scene between characters “Jim Dodge” and “Josie McClellan.” Because production continued through the Christmas shopping season, filming inside the store was only allowed after business hours, and lasted until morning. Some store employees remained after hours, and several were chosen to be background actors, while others restocked departments utilized by the production crew.
       The 15 May 1990 HR noted that Carolco acquired foreign distribution rights for the picture at the 1990 Cannes Film Festival.
       Career Opportunities opened in late Mar 1991 to lukewarm reviews, several of which cited its similarities to previous John Hughes films.
       End credits include the following statements: “Special thanks to Richard Kraft, Debra Neil, Jessie Nelson”; “Filmed with the assistance of: Target Stores; Larry Jordan and the Employees of Target #378; Norm Bielowicz and Greg Torre and the Georgia Film and Videotape Office; People of Monroe, GA; Angela Meadows and the Walton County Chamber ... More Less

The 17 Sep 1989 LAT announced the picture as director Bryan Gordon’s theatrical feature debut. On 13 Nov 1989, DV reported the start of principal photography that day in Atlanta, GA. The 17 Nov 1989 HR estimated a seven-week production schedule.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, filmmaker John Hughes, along with Bryan Gordon and producer A. Hunt Lowry, chose the rural town of Monroe, GA, following a nationwide search for a suitable location. For the department store set, Target Corporation provided a newly-renovated store near Atlanta, GA. The crew created another department store set within the existing store, and included a “Garden of Eden,” designed for the emotional scene between characters “Jim Dodge” and “Josie McClellan.” Because production continued through the Christmas shopping season, filming inside the store was only allowed after business hours, and lasted until morning. Some store employees remained after hours, and several were chosen to be background actors, while others restocked departments utilized by the production crew.
       The 15 May 1990 HR noted that Carolco acquired foreign distribution rights for the picture at the 1990 Cannes Film Festival.
       Career Opportunities opened in late Mar 1991 to lukewarm reviews, several of which cited its similarities to previous John Hughes films.
       End credits include the following statements: “Special thanks to Richard Kraft, Debra Neil, Jessie Nelson”; “Filmed with the assistance of: Target Stores; Larry Jordan and the Employees of Target #378; Norm Bielowicz and Greg Torre and the Georgia Film and Videotape Office; People of Monroe, GA; Angela Meadows and the Walton County Chamber of Commerce; City of Monroe Mayor’s Office; City of Monroe Police Department; City of Monroe Fire Department.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
13 Nov 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Nov 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 May 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Apr 1991
p. 5, 14.
Los Angeles Times
17 Sep 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
1 Apr 1991
p. 1.
New York Times
31 Mar 1991
p. 38.
Variety
8 Apr 1991
p. 68.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Hughes Entertainment presents
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Prod mgr, Los Angeles crew
Prod dir, Los Angeles crew
1st asst dir, Los Angeles crew
2d asst dir, Los Angeles crew
DGA trainee, Los Angeles crew
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st cam asst
2d asst cam
Still photog
2d unit cam op
Steadicam op
Best boy elec
Best boy elec
Elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Video tech
Video tech
Video asst
Dir of photog, Los Angeles crew
Cam op, Los Angeles crew
Cam op, Los Angeles crew
1st asst cam, Los Angeles crew
1st asst cam, Los Angeles crew
2d asst cam, Los Angeles crew
2d asst cam, Los Angeles crew
Still photog, Los Angeles crew
Steadicam op, Los Angeles crew
Gaffer, Los Angeles crew
Best boy elec, Los Angeles crew
Elec, Los Angeles crew
Elec, Los Angeles crew
Elec, Los Angeles crew
2d dolly grip, Los Angeles crew
Grip, Los Angeles crew
Grip, Los Angeles crew
Video asst, Los Angeles crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept prod asst
Prod illustrator, Los Angeles crew
Illustrator
Asst to the prod des
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
Addl ed, Los Angeles crew
1st asst ed, Los Angeles crew
1st asst ed, Los Angeles crew
Apprentice ed, Los Angeles crew
Apprentice ed, Los Angeles crew
Apprentice ed, Los Angeles crew
Post prod supv, Los Angeles crew
Post prod supv, Los Angeles crew
Negative cut by, Los Angeles crew
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Asst props
Asst to prod des
Const coord
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Sign painter
Head painter
Painter
Painter
Prop master, Los Angeles crew
Swing gang, Los Angeles crew
Swing gang, Los Angeles crew
Const coord, Los Angeles crew
Const foreman, Los Angeles crew
Labor foreman, Los Angeles crew
Laborer, Los Angeles crew
Painter, Los Angeles crew
Painter, Los Angeles crew
Carpenter
Painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Ward asst
Ward asst, Los Angeles crew
Seamstress
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus supv
Mus ed, Los Angeles crew
Supv mus ed, Los Angeles crew
Mus coord/The Soundtrack Co., Los Angeles crew
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd mixer
Boom man
Utility sd man
Utility sd man
Boom op, Los Angeles crew
Utility sd, Los Angeles crew
Sd ed, Los Angeles crew
Supv sd ed, Los Angeles crew
Supv sd ed, Los Angeles crew
Supv foley ed Los Angeles crew
Supv ADR ed, Los Angeles crew
Sd ed, Los Angeles crew
Sd ed, Los Angeles crew
Sd ed, Los Angeles crew
Sd ed, Los Angeles crew
Sd ed, Los Angeles crew
Asst sd ed, Los Angeles crew
Asst sd ed, Los Angeles crew
Asst sd ed, Los Angeles crew
Foley mixer, Los Angeles crew
Foley rec, Los Angeles crew
Foley artist, Los Angeles crew
Foley artist, Los Angeles crew
Foley artist, Los Angeles crew
ADR mixer, Los Angeles crew
ADR rec, Los Angeles crew
Re-rec mixer, Los Angeles crew
Re-rec mixer, Los Angeles crew
Re-rec mixer, Los Angeles crew
Dubbing rec, Los Angeles crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Main title des
SPFX coord
SPFX coord
SPFX asst
SPFX coord, Los Angeles crew
Opticals, Los Angeles crew
Title opticals, Los Angeles crew
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Key hairstylist
Key makeup artist, Los Angeles crew
Key hairstylist, Los Angeles crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod coord
Assoc prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Loc asst
Unit pub
Casting assoc
Asst to Hunt Lowry
Asst to John Hughes
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Office prod asst
Office prod asst
First aid paramedic
Projectionist
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Transportation co-capt
Craft service
Atlanta
Prod coord, Los Angeles crew
Assoc prod coord, Los Angeles crew
Prod accountant
Scr supv, Los Angeles crew
Loc mgr, Los Angeles crew
Animal wrangler, Los Angeles crew
Transportation coord, Los Angeles crew
Transportation captain, Los Angeles crew
Catering by, Los Angeles crew
Craft service, Los Angeles crew
Target stores contact, Los Angeles crew
Target tech adv, Los Angeles crew
Asst prod coord, Los Angeles crew
Asst to Bryan Gordon
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
STAND INS
Voiceover
Voiceover
Voiceover
Voiceover
Voiceover
Voiceover
Voiceover
Voiceover
Voiceover
Voiceover
Voiceover
Voiceover
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Timer, Los Angeles crew
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“I Wanna Stay Home,” written by A. Sturmer, performed by Jelly Fish, courtesy of Charisma Records America, Inc.
“Smoke Gets In Your Eyes,” written by Jerome Kern, performed by Lawrence Welk, courtesy of Ranwood Records, a Welk Music Group Co., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“The Jeopardy! Theme,” written by Merv Griffin, courtesy of Jeopardy Productions, Inc.
+
SONGS
“I Wanna Stay Home,” written by A. Sturmer, performed by Jelly Fish, courtesy of Charisma Records America, Inc.
“Smoke Gets In Your Eyes,” written by Jerome Kern, performed by Lawrence Welk, courtesy of Ranwood Records, a Welk Music Group Co., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“The Jeopardy! Theme,” written by Merv Griffin, courtesy of Jeopardy Productions, Inc.
“King Kong Five,” written and performed by Mano Negra, courtesy of Virgin France
“The Good, The Bad And The Ugly,” written by Ennio Morricone, from the motion picture soundtrack, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capital Records, Inc., by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
“Cruel, Crazy, Beautiful World,” written by performed by Johnny Clegg, courtesy of Capital Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
“Better World,” written by Michael West, performed by Rebel MC, courtesy of Desire Records
“Nel Blu Di Pinto Di Blu,” written by Mitchell Parrish, arranged by Alf Clausen for “Moonlighting,” courtesy of ABC Circle Films
“Nothing On My Mind,” written by Tim Brinkhurst, performed by Soho, courtesy of Atco Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Don’t Quit,” written by Jimmy “Senya” Haynes, performed by Caron Wheeler, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capital Records, Inc., by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
“Where Are You Baby,” written and performed by Betty Boo, courtesy of Reprise Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Go! (Club Mix),” written by Ash/Campling/K. Haskins, performed by Tones On Tail, courtesy of RCA Records
“Tiny Little Heart Attack,” written by Sverre Wiik, Harald Wiik, performed by Money Talks, courtesy of Curb Records.
+
COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
29 March 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 29 March 1991
Production Date:
13 November 1989--early January 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
6 May 1991
Copyright Number:
PA518819
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
83
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30893
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At an animal shelter in Monroe, Illinois, Jim Dodge delivers a monologue about his imagined exploits to a group of dogs, prompting his boss, Hubie Marshall, to fire him. Afterward, Jim explains his unemployment to three younger boys, claiming he invented the “artificial cow heart,” but now seeks a new enterprise after selling his animal hospital to pay delinquent taxes. While Jim begs a former employer for work, his father, Bud Dodge, appears in his cement mixer and berates the young man for losing yet another job. In the morning, Bud drives Jim to a low-price department store to apply for a janitorial position. Bud warns that if Jim fails to secure this job, he will be sent to St. Louis, Missouri, to work in a relative’s garden supply store. Jim enters the office of manager C. D. Marsh, who mistakes the young man for a prospective operations chief, offering him a generous salary and benefits package. Realizing his error, Marsh hires Jim as “night clean-up boy” at meager wages with no benefits. Meanwhile, millionaire Roger Roy McClellan confers with state officials Bob Bosenbeck and Dave Hockner about building an automotive plant. McClellan's daughter, Josie, enters and intentionally embarrasses her father by behaving in a seductive manner toward the officials. She spends the afternoon shoplifting at the store where Jim Dodge works, while Jim hires a limousine to drive him to work, imagining himself as the store’s future owner. As the store is about to close, Jim is greeted by the shotgun-toting custodian, who dispenses detailed instructions, then locks him inside until 7:00 the next morning. Once Jim ... +


At an animal shelter in Monroe, Illinois, Jim Dodge delivers a monologue about his imagined exploits to a group of dogs, prompting his boss, Hubie Marshall, to fire him. Afterward, Jim explains his unemployment to three younger boys, claiming he invented the “artificial cow heart,” but now seeks a new enterprise after selling his animal hospital to pay delinquent taxes. While Jim begs a former employer for work, his father, Bud Dodge, appears in his cement mixer and berates the young man for losing yet another job. In the morning, Bud drives Jim to a low-price department store to apply for a janitorial position. Bud warns that if Jim fails to secure this job, he will be sent to St. Louis, Missouri, to work in a relative’s garden supply store. Jim enters the office of manager C. D. Marsh, who mistakes the young man for a prospective operations chief, offering him a generous salary and benefits package. Realizing his error, Marsh hires Jim as “night clean-up boy” at meager wages with no benefits. Meanwhile, millionaire Roger Roy McClellan confers with state officials Bob Bosenbeck and Dave Hockner about building an automotive plant. McClellan's daughter, Josie, enters and intentionally embarrasses her father by behaving in a seductive manner toward the officials. She spends the afternoon shoplifting at the store where Jim Dodge works, while Jim hires a limousine to drive him to work, imagining himself as the store’s future owner. As the store is about to close, Jim is greeted by the shotgun-toting custodian, who dispenses detailed instructions, then locks him inside until 7:00 the next morning. Once Jim is alone, he illuminates the darkened store and quickly completes his duties, after which he amuses himself with a variety of merchandise. At the Dodge home, Bud admits to his wife, Dotty, that he should be helping Jim find a suitable career, rather than forcing him to accept menial work. While rollerskating through the store, Jim is surprised by Josie and crashes into a pantyhose display. She reveals that she was shoplifting and fell asleep inside a fitting room. When asked why the richest girl in town would shoplift, Josie explains her actions as a failed attempt to rebel against her abusive, authoritarian father. While Jim and Josie feast on reheated frozen dinners, Roger Roy McClellan searches the town for his daughter, accompanied by Officer Don of the Monroe Police Department. After dinner, Jim is upset when Josie informs him of his reputation as the “town liar,” and he asks if she agrees with the characterization. Josie confesses that she knows little about Jim, even though they attended the same schools. Jim recalls his miserable high school years, while Josie remarks on the declining quality of her life since graduation. When Jim states his preference for living with his parents, Josie accuses him of being dishonest with himself, especially where his love life is concerned. Both lament their inability to break free from their families, admitting they are afraid to be alone. Josie expresses her desire to live in Los Angeles, California. She produces $52,000 from her purse, inviting Jim to join her, and offers to compensate Jim for ignoring him all through school. He recalls a tenth-grade dance, during which students were required to change partners, and asks to finish the brief dance he had with Josie. Their ensuing attempt to make love in a pup tent is interrupted by Officer Don, knocking on the store window in search of Josie. Jim convinces the policeman he is alone, and Officer Don assures Jim that the custodian will not return before morning. As Jim and Josie race through the store on roller skates, they collide with Nestor Pyle and Gil Kinney, a pair of robbers responsible for the recent murder of a store clerk, knocking them unconscious. Jim and Josie take refuge in a fitting room, but are soon discovered. When Nestor Pyle asks their identities, Jim claims to be the liaison for a $60 million sale of illegal narcotics, and Josie is his hostage. He convinces Nestor and Gil they are surrounded by armed drug dealers, and seizes the robbers’ weapons. Upon realizing that Jim was lying, Nestor retrieves their weapons by claiming they are unloaded, then fires a shot to prove he is also lying. While being marched to the concession stand at gunpoint, Jim and Josie concoct a plan in which Josie will ally herself with the robbers and return later for Jim after she gets away. She gains Nestor’s confidence by flirting with him, then fills a shopping cart with heavy sports equipment. As Nestor and Gil struggle to load the merchandise into their car, Josie takes the wheel and drives away. When the criminals return to the store, Jim frightens them into submission with the custodian’s shotgun. As the sun rises, Josie returns with Officer Don, who finds Nestor and Gil bound to patio chairs. Jim impresses his young friends as he drives through town with Josie in her father’s Cadillac. Sometime later, Jim and Josie sit poolside in Hollywood, California, and Jim imagines himself as the community’s future owner. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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