Delirious (1991)

PG | 110 mins | Comedy, Fantasy | 9 August 1991

Cinematographer:

Robert Stevens

Production Designer:

Angelo Graham

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
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HISTORY

The cameo appearance by Robert Wagner is not listed in onscreen credits. Known for starring as “Jonathan Hart” on the prime time soap opera, Hart to Hart (ABC, 25 Aug 1979—31 Jul 1984), Wagner plays himself in Delirious, albeit as an actor performing the role of daytime soap opera character.
       On 16 Mar 1990, Back Stage announced that second unit filming began 14 Mar 1990 in New York City. After one week in New York, cast and crew returned to Los Angeles, CA, for principal photography. Production notes in AMPAS library files indicate that filming took place at two luxury estates in Montecito, CA, near Santa Barbara. Additional exterior shots were photographed in Pasadena, CA, at the residence known as “Wayne Manor” from the television series Batman (ABC, 12 Jan 1966—14 Mar 1968). Other Southern California locations included: Griffith Park and Elysian Park in Los Angeles; the Angeles Crest Highway in the San Gabriel Mountains; Malibu State Park; Greer Ranch in Murrieta; the Walt Disney Company’s Golden Oak Ranch; and Brookfield Farms in Thousand Oaks. A 7 Jun 1990 DV news item announced that principal photography was complete.
       Although various contemporary sources anticipated a Dec 1990 release, the merger of Pathé Communications and MGM/UA in Nov 1990 delayed the picture’s opening. Articles in the 19 and 27 Feb 1991 HR described the studio’s financial condition as “precarious” and noted that the release of Delirious, which had already been pushed to 8 Mar 1991, would be further delayed until $7 million could be found for prints and advertising. However, MGM insisted that the “costs were ... More Less

The cameo appearance by Robert Wagner is not listed in onscreen credits. Known for starring as “Jonathan Hart” on the prime time soap opera, Hart to Hart (ABC, 25 Aug 1979—31 Jul 1984), Wagner plays himself in Delirious, albeit as an actor performing the role of daytime soap opera character.
       On 16 Mar 1990, Back Stage announced that second unit filming began 14 Mar 1990 in New York City. After one week in New York, cast and crew returned to Los Angeles, CA, for principal photography. Production notes in AMPAS library files indicate that filming took place at two luxury estates in Montecito, CA, near Santa Barbara. Additional exterior shots were photographed in Pasadena, CA, at the residence known as “Wayne Manor” from the television series Batman (ABC, 12 Jan 1966—14 Mar 1968). Other Southern California locations included: Griffith Park and Elysian Park in Los Angeles; the Angeles Crest Highway in the San Gabriel Mountains; Malibu State Park; Greer Ranch in Murrieta; the Walt Disney Company’s Golden Oak Ranch; and Brookfield Farms in Thousand Oaks. A 7 Jun 1990 DV news item announced that principal photography was complete.
       Although various contemporary sources anticipated a Dec 1990 release, the merger of Pathé Communications and MGM/UA in Nov 1990 delayed the picture’s opening. Articles in the 19 and 27 Feb 1991 HR described the studio’s financial condition as “precarious” and noted that the release of Delirious, which had already been pushed to 8 Mar 1991, would be further delayed until $7 million could be found for prints and advertising. However, MGM insisted that the “costs were covered,” and that the picture would open in August 1991.
       Critical reception was resoundingly negative, with a 17 Jun 1991 HR review faulting the film’s “stereotypical characters and busy plotting,” and a 9 Aug 1991 LAT review describing the picture as “a real bona fide stinker.”
       End credits include the following acknowledgements: “Special Thanks to: Bob Crane; Jennie Lew Tugend; Donald Trump – Wollman Rink Ice Capades; The City of New York, The Mayor’s Office for Film, Theater & Broadcasting; The Parks Department of the City of New York; The New York Zoological Society’s Central Park Zoo; and Louis Vuitton.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Back Stage
16 Mar 1990.
---
Daily Variety
20 Mar 1990.
---
Daily Variety
17 Apr 1990.
---
Daily Variety
7 Jun 1990.
---
Daily Variety
17 Jul 1991
p. 2, 14.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Feb 1991
p. 1, 104.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 1991
p. 10, 15.
Los Angeles Times
9 Aug 1991
Calendar, p. 8.
New York Times
9 Aug 1991
Section C, p. 12.
Variety
5 Aug 1991
p. 93.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer presents
a Richard Donner production
a Tom Mankiewicz film
in association with Star Partners III, Ltd.
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, New York crew
2d 2d asst dir, New York crew
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Best boy
Process compositing by
Gyrosphere op
Gyrosphere asst
Key grip
2d grip
Dolly grip
2d dolly grip
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Cam op, New York crew
Still photog, New York crew
Gaffer, New York crew
Key grip, New York crew
Cranes and dollies by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod illustrator
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Assoc ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter, Kona Cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Set des
Set des
Const coord
General foreman
Labor foreman
Labor foreman
Paint/Signs supv
Greensman
Prop master
Asst prop master
Set dec
Mansion consultant
Set dec, New York crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Costumer for Mr. Candy
Set costumer
Set costumer
Selected party cost courtesy of
Ward asst, New York crew
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
Mus supv
Mus ed
Scoring mixer
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd mixer
Sd mixer, New York crew
Dolby consultant
Foley by
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR voice casting
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Co-supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff coord
Opticals
DANCE
Spec choreog by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Eff makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting assoc
Extras casting, Cenex Casting
Extras casting, Cenex Casting
Extras casting
Musicians casting
Musicians casting
Loc mgr
Santa Barbara consultant
Helicopter pilot
Prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst to Mr. Donner
Asst to Mr. Claybourne
Asst to Mr. Cohen and Mr. Freeman
Asst to Mr. Mankiewicz
Asst coord
Prod asst
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Horse trainer
Horse wrangler
Horse wrangler
Exotic animals, Animal Actors
Exotic animals
Scr supv, 2d unit
Prod coord, New York crew
Extras casting, New York crew
Loc mgr, New York crew
Transportation coord, New York unit
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Asst coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Delirious," written by Prince Nelson, performed by Prince, published by Controversy Music, admin. by WB Music Corp. (ASCAP), courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, Inc. by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"It's A Man's, Man's, Man's World," written by James Brown and Betty Newsome, performed by James Brown, published by Dynatone Music, admin. by Unichappell Music Co., Inc. (BMI)/Clamike Music Co. (BMI) admin. by Mietus Copyright Mngt., courtesy of PolyGram Special Products, a division of PolyGram Records, Inc.
"Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2 In C-Sharp Minor," written by Franz Liszt, performed by Leonard Pennario, courtesy of Angel/EMI, a division of Capitol Records, Inc. by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
+
SONGS
"Delirious," written by Prince Nelson, performed by Prince, published by Controversy Music, admin. by WB Music Corp. (ASCAP), courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, Inc. by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"It's A Man's, Man's, Man's World," written by James Brown and Betty Newsome, performed by James Brown, published by Dynatone Music, admin. by Unichappell Music Co., Inc. (BMI)/Clamike Music Co. (BMI) admin. by Mietus Copyright Mngt., courtesy of PolyGram Special Products, a division of PolyGram Records, Inc.
"Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2 In C-Sharp Minor," written by Franz Liszt, performed by Leonard Pennario, courtesy of Angel/EMI, a division of Capitol Records, Inc. by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Toy Parade"/"Leave It To Beaver" Theme, written by D. Kahn, M. Lenard, M. Greene from the album "Television's Greatest Hits--Vol. I," published by Marien Music Co. (ASCAP), courtesy of TeeVee Toons, Inc.
"Sweet Lorraine," written by Mitchell Parish and Cliff Burwell, published by Mills Music, Inc. (ASCAP)
"Beyond Our Wildest Dreams," written by Jim Peterick and Cliff Eidelman, performed by John Melnick, published by Easy Action Music (ASCAP) and U/A Music, Inc. (ASCAP).
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
9 August 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 9 August 1991
Production Date:
14 March--early June 1990
Copyright Claimant:
MGM-Pathe Communications Company
Copyright Date:
1 October 1991
Copyright Number:
PA538833
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
110
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30794
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, Jack Gable grows irate waiting for the cable television repairman to arrive. When the signal is finally restored, he turns on Beyond Our Dreams, a daytime soap opera, explaining to the repairman that he writes for the show. Later that morning, Jack goes to the production office for a meeting. There, he stumbles into Louise, a demure actress who intends to audition for the role of “Janet Dubois.” After insisting that “Janet” is no longer part of the story, Jack storms into Lou and Arlene Sherwood’s office. The two executives distract him by reminding him to “kill off” the character of “Rachel Hedison,” played by the temperamental Laura Claybourne. Jack, who has a crush on the beautiful actress, refuses. Lou pats him on the shoulder and tells Jack that everything will work out. After Jack leaves, Arlene calls writer Arnie Fetterman, who assures her that the “Janet Dubois” scenes are complete, and that he is working on writing “Rachel” out of the show. After Beyond Our Dreams wraps for the day, an infatuated Jack asks Laura Claybourne what she thinks of the future storylines he created for her, but the self-absorbed actress is unhappy with how he turned her rich heiress character into a working girl. Jack returns home and packs for a weekend trip to Vermont. Laura Claybourne calls, seeking Jack’s attention. When he tells her he is about to leave, she invites herself along. Jack is thrilled, until she changes her mind at the last minute. En route to Vermont, Jack gets into a car accident, awakening in the hospital on ... +


In New York City, Jack Gable grows irate waiting for the cable television repairman to arrive. When the signal is finally restored, he turns on Beyond Our Dreams, a daytime soap opera, explaining to the repairman that he writes for the show. Later that morning, Jack goes to the production office for a meeting. There, he stumbles into Louise, a demure actress who intends to audition for the role of “Janet Dubois.” After insisting that “Janet” is no longer part of the story, Jack storms into Lou and Arlene Sherwood’s office. The two executives distract him by reminding him to “kill off” the character of “Rachel Hedison,” played by the temperamental Laura Claybourne. Jack, who has a crush on the beautiful actress, refuses. Lou pats him on the shoulder and tells Jack that everything will work out. After Jack leaves, Arlene calls writer Arnie Fetterman, who assures her that the “Janet Dubois” scenes are complete, and that he is working on writing “Rachel” out of the show. After Beyond Our Dreams wraps for the day, an infatuated Jack asks Laura Claybourne what she thinks of the future storylines he created for her, but the self-absorbed actress is unhappy with how he turned her rich heiress character into a working girl. Jack returns home and packs for a weekend trip to Vermont. Laura Claybourne calls, seeking Jack’s attention. When he tells her he is about to leave, she invites herself along. Jack is thrilled, until she changes her mind at the last minute. En route to Vermont, Jack gets into a car accident, awakening in the hospital on Beyond Our Dreams. The doctor introduces himself as “Paul Kirkwood,” amusing Jack, who presumes that the actor, Dennis Graham, is playing a trick on him. However, when the writer goes to the window, he is shocked to see the town of “Ashford Falls” bustling with activity. Jack deduces that he is dead and living in hell. When the nurse threatens to give him a shot, Jack plays along and insists he is feeling better. Leaving the hospital, he encounters “Janet Dubois,” who recognizes him as Wall Street tycoon “Jack Gates,” a character created by Jack, but who has yet to be introduced on the show. Across the street, a man with an eye patch observes Jack and Janet, before driving away to a mansion. There, he proudly informs his father, billionaire Carter Hedison, that Jack Gates is in town. Carter Hedison dismisses his son, Ty, as a dreamer, and asks Ty’s yuppie brother, Blake, to investigate. Meanwhile, Jack tries to make sense of his situation. Janet informs him that he is in Ashford Falls to purchase her father’s pharmaceutical formula, which Carter Hedison also hopes to acquire. Jack insists he is a writer, not a businessman, provoking Janet to retort that he should write his life as he sees it, rather than argue with her. She storms out, and Jack decides to test her advice. He types a scene on his typewriter, and realizes that whatever he writes comes true. After encountering a dismissive “Rachel Hedison” downtown, Jack decides to use his newfound power to make her fall in love with him. That afternoon, Rachel goes horseback riding with her boyfriend, Dr. Kirkwood. Suddenly, her horse breaks into a gallop. Just as she is about to careen over a cliff, Jack rescues her. He does not reveal his identify, and Rachel swoons as he rides away. That night, Carter Hedison and his three children—Rachel, Ty, and Blake—discuss making a fortune from a new fat-burning pill. Blake notes that their scheme will be ruined if Jack Gates acquires the drug formula. Later, Janet Dubois calls Jack and informs him that someone broke into her father’s laboratory. She accuses him of working for the Hedisons, but Jack protests. Just then, she realizes someone is still in the lab. Hearing her screams, Jack quickly types a rescue mission featuring himself as the hero. Afterward, the love-struck Janet invites Jack to have dinner with her. A few days later, the Hedison family hosts a benefit auction in the town square. Jack stuns everyone when he drives up in a flashy sports car. Against her father’s wishes, Rachel leaves with Jack, who tries to impress her by driving recklessly at high speed while blindfolded. That night, Janet grows despondent while waiting for Jack to arrive for dinner. Someone knocks on the door and introduces himself as “Jack Gates,” but he is not the Jack she knows. The two confront Jack at his hotel. The writer recognizes the stranger as Robert Wagner, a prime time soap opera star. Unknown to the trio, Ty Hedison lurks outside with a gun, stalking Jack Gates. However, he misfires, and Robert Wagner is killed. Jack grabs his typewriter, reviving Robert Wagner and sending him away on a trip. Out of concern for Janet, Jack writes her a new storyline in which she is a research scientist in Africa. In the days that follow, Jack sequesters himself in his hotel room, where he drinks alcohol and writes preposterous scenes in hope of winning Rachel’s affection. During a party at the Hedison mansion, Jack plays a virtuosic piano piece, saves a choking man’s life, and performs a dance routine with Rachel. Much to his surprise, Janet Dubois returns to Ashford Falls. She makes an elegant appearance at the party, before learning that she, not Rachel, is Carter Hedison’s daughter. Chaos ensues as the Hedison family turns on each other. When Janet is accidentally shot by Blake Hedison, Jack admits his feelings for her. As she is rushed to the hospital, Blake informs Jack that Dr. Kirkwood plans to botch the surgery. The writer returns to his hotel room, but before he can write a new scene, Robert Wagner walks in and shoots him. Jack awakens in a hospital bed on the set of Beyond Our Dreams. Actors Laura Claybourne and Dennis Graham comfort him, but he accuses them of being insincere, before realizing he is back in New York City. The next day, Jack confronts the Sherwoods and insists they allow him free reign in writing the character of “Janet.” Arlene chokes on her sandwich, and Jack forces her to agree to his terms before rescuing her with the Heimlich maneuver. After arranging for Louise to be cast as “Janet,” Jack writes “Rachel” off the show and looks forward to creating new narratives for the residents of “Ashford Falls.” +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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