Doc Hollywood (1991)

PG-13 | 114 mins | Comedy, Romance | 2 August 1991

Cinematographer:

Michael Chapman

Production Designer:

Lawrence Miller

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures
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HISTORY

       Although Screen International suggested that filming would begin in summer 1990, a 20 Nov 1990 HR production chart confirmed that principal photography began 7 Nov 1990 in Gainesville, FL. Production notes in AMPAS library files clarify that the small towns of Micanopy and McIntosh, south of Gainesville, were the actual locations used by filmmakers, with Florida “standing in” for South Carolina. A 22 Mar 1991 HR news item indicated that the Florida locations underwent a $12 million “transformation” to become the fictional town of "Grady." Filmmakers spent six weeks shooting in Florida, before returning to Los Angeles, CA, for an additional three weeks. Location filming took place in Hollywood and Beverly Hills. Interior scenes were completed at Warner Bros. Studios. The film’s total budget was $20 million, according to a 22 Aug 1991 HR article.
       On 16 Jul 1991, DV announced that a benefit preview screening would be held 31 Jul 1991 at the AMPAS Samuel Goldwyn Theater to support the Ocean Park Community Center drop-in clinic in Santa Monica, CA. An 18 Jul 1991 LAT news brief reported that the official premiere would be held 25 Jul 1991 at Edwards Newport Center, a multiplex in Newport Beach, CA, to raise funds for the emergency care unit at Hoag Hospital. Three weeks after the film’s 2 Aug 1991 nationwide release, a 22 Aug 1991 HR article indicated that Doc Hollywood had grossed $26.3 million at the box-office.
       End credits include the following acknowledgements: “The producers wish to thank: The People and Town of Micanopy, Florida; Gainesville Area Chamber of ... More Less

       Although Screen International suggested that filming would begin in summer 1990, a 20 Nov 1990 HR production chart confirmed that principal photography began 7 Nov 1990 in Gainesville, FL. Production notes in AMPAS library files clarify that the small towns of Micanopy and McIntosh, south of Gainesville, were the actual locations used by filmmakers, with Florida “standing in” for South Carolina. A 22 Mar 1991 HR news item indicated that the Florida locations underwent a $12 million “transformation” to become the fictional town of "Grady." Filmmakers spent six weeks shooting in Florida, before returning to Los Angeles, CA, for an additional three weeks. Location filming took place in Hollywood and Beverly Hills. Interior scenes were completed at Warner Bros. Studios. The film’s total budget was $20 million, according to a 22 Aug 1991 HR article.
       On 16 Jul 1991, DV announced that a benefit preview screening would be held 31 Jul 1991 at the AMPAS Samuel Goldwyn Theater to support the Ocean Park Community Center drop-in clinic in Santa Monica, CA. An 18 Jul 1991 LAT news brief reported that the official premiere would be held 25 Jul 1991 at Edwards Newport Center, a multiplex in Newport Beach, CA, to raise funds for the emergency care unit at Hoag Hospital. Three weeks after the film’s 2 Aug 1991 nationwide release, a 22 Aug 1991 HR article indicated that Doc Hollywood had grossed $26.3 million at the box-office.
       End credits include the following acknowledgements: “The producers wish to thank: The People and Town of Micanopy, Florida; Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce – Paula Bowlan, Motion Picture and Film Coordinator; The Florida State Film Commission – Wilton Plymel, Development Representative; Film Commission Ocala, Florida – Sue Sargeant-Latham, Film Coordinator; The Florida Department of Natural Resources – Florida Park Service; University of Florida – John V. Lombardi, President; City of Richmond, Virginia – Walter T. Kenney, Mayor; Metro Richmond Film Commission; Hanover County, Virginia; Department of Surgery – The Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York – Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center.”
       Doc Hollywood is based on Dr. Neil B. Shulman’s 1979 novel, What? Dead … Again?, a semi-autobiographical account of his experiences as a doctor in rural Georgia in the 1970s. Shulman was not involved in adapting his book into a screenplay, but did serve as the film’s associate producer. On 17 Mar 1990, Screen International noted that writer Kevin Wade was re-writing Jeffrey Price and Peter S. Seaman’s Doc Hollywood script. Nearly eight months later, a 2 Nov 1990 DV news item listed Daniel Pyne as one of the screenwriters, along with Seaman and Price. In the interim, the story’s location had been changed from Georgia to South Carolina. Ultimately, Pyne received screenwriting credit, but Kevin Wade did not. According to DV’s 29 Jul 1991 review, “the project spent years in development under many writers at Warner Bros.” A 30 Jul 1991 LAT article acknowledged the capricious nature of the project, but attributed its stops and starts to Michael J. Fox’s wavering interest in making the movie, rather than to script revisions.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
2 Nov 1990.
---
Daily Variety
16 Jul 1991.
---
Daily Variety
29 Jul 1991
p. 3, 7.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Nov 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Mar 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 1991
p. 8, 22.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Aug 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
11 Mar 1990.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Jul 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 Jul 1991
Section F, p. 1, 9.
Los Angeles Times
2 Aug 1991
Calendar, p. 1.
New York Times
2 Aug 1991
Section C, p. 8.
Screen International
17 Mar 1990.
---
Variety
5 Aug 1991
p. 92.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. Presents
A Film by Michael Caton-Jones
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam (Florida)
Still photog
Video op
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Key grip
2d grip
2d grip
2d grip
Dolly grip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept asst
Art dept asst (Florida)
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Negative cutting by
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Master scenic artist
Master scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist (Florida)
Scenic artist (Florida)
Leadman
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Greensman
Greensman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Men's costumer
Women's costumer
MUSIC
Mus ed
SOUND
Prod mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles by
Titles by
Spec eff supv
Opticals
Process photog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Mr. Fox's makeup artist
Addl makeup
Hairstylist
Mr. Fox's hairstylist
Addl hairstylist
Addl hairstylist (Florida)
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Asst to Mr. Caton-Jones
Prods' asst
Asst to Mr. Fox
Prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Asst prod office coord (Florida)
Prod accountant
Asst auditor
Asst auditor
Staff asst
Staff asst (Florida)
Prod assoc
Animal trainer
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr (Florida)
Extras casting
Loc casting (Florida)
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt (Florida)
Craft service
Craft service (Florida)
First aid
First aid (Florida)
First aid (Florida)
Surgical consultant
Surgical consultant
Surgical consultant
Surgical consultant
Medical advisor
Medical advisor
Fitness consultant
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book What? ... Dead Again? by Neil B. Shulman, M.D. (Baton Rouge, 1979).
SONGS
"The One And Only," written by Nik Kershaw, performed by Chesney Hawkes, courtesy of Chrysalis Records Ltd.
"The Millwood Stomp," composed by Carter Burwell
"Crazy," written by Willie Nelson, performed by Patsy Cline, courtesy of MCA Records
+
SONGS
"The One And Only," written by Nik Kershaw, performed by Chesney Hawkes, courtesy of Chrysalis Records Ltd.
"The Millwood Stomp," composed by Carter Burwell
"Crazy," written by Willie Nelson, performed by Patsy Cline, courtesy of MCA Records
"Pomone Waltz," performed by Albert Sandler, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Buck's Nouvelle Jole Blon," written by Stanley Dural, Jr., performed by Buckwheat Zydeco, courtesy of Black Top Records Inc.
"Le Vieux Boeuf Et Le Vieux Charriot," performed by Aubrey DeVille, courtesy of Rounder Records Corp.
"La Robe De Rosalie," performed by Adam and Cyprien Landreneau, courtesy of Rounder Records Corp.
"Les Piniers," performed by Adam and Cyprien Landreneau, courtesy of Rounder Records Corp.
"Gettin' Up The Stairs," performed by Clyde Davenport, courtesy of Rebel Records
"Standing In The Need Of Prayer," performed by The Stanley Brothers and The Clinch Mountain Boys, courtesy of Rebel Records
"Bailero" (from Canteloube's "Songs Of The Auvergne"), performed by Netania Devrath, courtesy of Vanguard Classics, a division of the Omega Record Group, Inc.
"Concerto For Jew's Harp, Mandora And Orchestra In E Major," written by Johann Georg Albrechtsberger, performed by Munich Chamber Orchestra, courtesy of Orfeo International Music GmbH
"Kije's Wedding" (from "Lieutenant Kije"), written by Sergei Prokovief
"Polegnala E Todora," written by Philip Koutev.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 August 1991
Premiere Information:
Newport Beach premiere: 25 July 1991
Los Angeles and New York openings: 2 August 1991
Production Date:
began 7 November 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
6 November 1991
Copyright Number:
PA541086
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
114
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31196
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Dr. Ben Stone works his last shift in the chaotic emergency room at Washington Presbyterian Hospital, looking forward to the straightforward surgeries and generous compensation that await at a cosmetic surgery clinic in Beverly Hills, California, where he has an interview. The next morning, he leaves Washington, D.C. in his vintage Porsche Speedster. When he encounters road construction, he drives on the shoulder toward an exit, laughing as he passes stopped traffic. However, the maneuver leads him into rural South Carolina. Coming around a bend, Ben veers to avoid two cows, plowing into the underbrush and into a white picket fence. He volunteers to write a check to repair the fence, but the owner, Judge Evans, rejects the offer, sentencing Ben to thirty-two hours of community service at Grady Memorial Hospital. When Ben worries about making it to Los Angeles in time for his interview, the town mechanic assures him he will fix the sports car. Ben takes a taxi to the hospital, where the stern Nurse Packer shows him to an operating room, indicating he can sleep there. A short while later, Ben is awakened by Nick Nicholson, the mayor of Grady, who insists on finding him better accommodations. At a cabin in the woods, three elderly women welcome Ben with food and moonshine. Sitting by the fire, they gossip with the newcomer until he falls asleep. In the morning, Ben stumbles outside to the pond at the edge of the property, stunned when a naked woman emerges from the water and walks brazenly past him. Later, Ben asks Mayor Nicholson to pardon him, but the mayor laughs and announces his intention to convince Ben to remain in ... +


Dr. Ben Stone works his last shift in the chaotic emergency room at Washington Presbyterian Hospital, looking forward to the straightforward surgeries and generous compensation that await at a cosmetic surgery clinic in Beverly Hills, California, where he has an interview. The next morning, he leaves Washington, D.C. in his vintage Porsche Speedster. When he encounters road construction, he drives on the shoulder toward an exit, laughing as he passes stopped traffic. However, the maneuver leads him into rural South Carolina. Coming around a bend, Ben veers to avoid two cows, plowing into the underbrush and into a white picket fence. He volunteers to write a check to repair the fence, but the owner, Judge Evans, rejects the offer, sentencing Ben to thirty-two hours of community service at Grady Memorial Hospital. When Ben worries about making it to Los Angeles in time for his interview, the town mechanic assures him he will fix the sports car. Ben takes a taxi to the hospital, where the stern Nurse Packer shows him to an operating room, indicating he can sleep there. A short while later, Ben is awakened by Nick Nicholson, the mayor of Grady, who insists on finding him better accommodations. At a cabin in the woods, three elderly women welcome Ben with food and moonshine. Sitting by the fire, they gossip with the newcomer until he falls asleep. In the morning, Ben stumbles outside to the pond at the edge of the property, stunned when a naked woman emerges from the water and walks brazenly past him. Later, Ben asks Mayor Nicholson to pardon him, but the mayor laughs and announces his intention to convince Ben to remain in Grady. At the hospital, Ben is surprised to see the woman from the pond. He flirts with her, but she dismisses his advances by informing him that she is “Lou,” the hospital ambulance driver. Ben notices the waiting room overflowing with patients, and dutifully sets to work. The complaints are minor, and Ben sails through the day dealing with one colorful local resident after another. At the end of his shift, a couple rush in with their young son, Zeb, who is wheezing and turning blue. Ben determines that the boy has a heart condition, and asks Nurse Packer to call a medical helicopter. The nurse instead calls Dr. Hogue, who suggests Ben give Zeb a soda. Outraged, Ben grabs the phone and yells at the physician. In anticipation of the helicopter’s arrival, they take the boy outside. Dr. Hogue drives up and admonishes Ben for scaring the parents, before opening a can of soda for Zeb to drink. The cantankerous old doctor explains to Ben that the boy ate his father’s chewing tobacco. When Zeb complained of indigestion, his parents administered a homemade antacid. However, all that was necessary to calm his stomach was a soda. After the incident, Ben walks over to the auto repair shop to check on his car. He screams at the sight of the dismantled engine, but Melvin, the mechanic, tells him not to worry. The next morning, Ben stops at the diner, where he is accosted by Nancy Lee, a young woman with aspirations to leave Grady. He excuses himself and sits with Lou, who is studying for her law school entrance exam. Their banter is cut short by the arrival of Lou’s gum-chewing suitor, Hank Gordon. Later, at the hospital, a patient returns with a pig, offering it as compensation for the doctor’s services. Ben walks the pig through town, running into Mayor Nicholson, who invites him to a dinner party. Ben stops by Lou’s house and asks her to be his date. Just then, a young girl runs up, and Lou introduces her four-year-old daughter, Emma, before accepting Ben’s invitation. After dinner at the mayor’s house, Lou turns down an amorous Ben, and he returns to his cabin, disappointed. The next day, Lou drives Ben into the backcountry to make house calls. Inspired, he muses about starting an outpatient program at the clinic in Beverly Hills. Lou mocks his affection for city life, but Ben reveals he grew up in a small town in Indiana. Having accomplished his dream of leaving, he has no desire to return. Just then, they learn that Dr. Hogue is having a heart attack. They return to the hospital, and Ben saves Dr. Hogue’s life. The next day, the town of Grady celebrates its annual squash festival. Ben learns that his car is repaired, but out of concern for Dr. Hogue, he calls the Beverly Hills clinic and tells them he cannot be there in time for his interview. However, at the carnival that night, Judge Evans informs Ben that he need not complete the rest of his community service. Under a shower of fireworks, Ben and Lou kiss. She suggests they spend the night together, but he is confused about his feelings. He returns home, surprised to see Hank Gordon sitting by the fire. The two men philosophize about life, and Ben decides to leave Grady that night. However, on his way out of town, he is flagged down by a local resident whose wife is about to give birth. As the baby is born in the back of a station wagon, a big-rig truck smashes into Ben’s car, which he left parked in the middle of the road. Ben joins the baby in crying. The next day, Lou presents Ben with a plane ticket to Los Angeles, a gift from all the residents of Grady, who send him off with warm wishes. At the cosmetic surgery clinic in Beverly Hills, Dr. Halberstrom offers Ben a job, remarking on Dr. Hogue’s impressive letter of recommendation. In the days that follow, Ben assists Dr. Halberstrom in various routine surgeries. However, he cannot stop thinking about his recent experiences in the country. At the clinic one morning, the receptionist gives him a message, commenting on the woman’s Southern accent. Ben rushes to a restaurant to meet the unidentified caller, crestfallen to see Nancy Lee, who drove his car to Los Angeles. She surmises he was hoping to see Lou. A few days later, Ben returns to Grady Memorial Hospital, where he surprises Lou with a kiss. With his pig in tow, they walk down the street, teasing each other and laughing. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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