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HISTORY

Actor Louis Gossett, Jr. had initially been considered for a co-starring role, according to the 2 Jun 1990 Screen International.
       Principal photography began on 5 Jul 1990, as reported in the 17 Jul 1990 HR production chart, which referred to the film by its working title, Autobahn. The 12 Jul 1990 DV announced an eight-week shooting schedule, with locations in Los Angeles, CA, and East Germany. The 31 Jul 1990 HR stated that Vlade Divac, a Yugoslavian basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers, would make a cameo appearance in the film.
       According to the 24 Nov 1990 Screen International, the week of production in East Germany began within days of the country’s official “reunification” with its western counterpart, requiring the crew to reconstruct guard towers that had recently been removed from the border.
       Announcing the title change to Driving Me Crazy, the 23 Oct 1990 HR reported that filming had completed. The picture was the first of three planned features starring German television personality Thomas Gottschalk, for the Motion Picture Corporation of America (MPCA). Openings were planned for May 1991 in Germany, and June 1991 in the U.S.
       On 6 May 1991, Var reported that the picture would screen at the 1991 Cannes Film Festival market.
       The film was released in Germany as Trabbi Goes To Hollywood, according to a review in the 17 Jun 1991 Var. The Los Angeles premiere of Driving Me Crazy was scheduled for 15 Nov 1991, as indicated in ... More Less

Actor Louis Gossett, Jr. had initially been considered for a co-starring role, according to the 2 Jun 1990 Screen International.
       Principal photography began on 5 Jul 1990, as reported in the 17 Jul 1990 HR production chart, which referred to the film by its working title, Autobahn. The 12 Jul 1990 DV announced an eight-week shooting schedule, with locations in Los Angeles, CA, and East Germany. The 31 Jul 1990 HR stated that Vlade Divac, a Yugoslavian basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers, would make a cameo appearance in the film.
       According to the 24 Nov 1990 Screen International, the week of production in East Germany began within days of the country’s official “reunification” with its western counterpart, requiring the crew to reconstruct guard towers that had recently been removed from the border.
       Announcing the title change to Driving Me Crazy, the 23 Oct 1990 HR reported that filming had completed. The picture was the first of three planned features starring German television personality Thomas Gottschalk, for the Motion Picture Corporation of America (MPCA). Openings were planned for May 1991 in Germany, and June 1991 in the U.S.
       On 6 May 1991, Var reported that the picture would screen at the 1991 Cannes Film Festival market.
       The film was released in Germany as Trabbi Goes To Hollywood, according to a review in the 17 Jun 1991 Var. The Los Angeles premiere of Driving Me Crazy was scheduled for 15 Nov 1991, as indicated in an advertisement from that day’s Reader.
       End credits include the following statements: Hotel accommodations provided by Hotel Bayerischer HOF, Robert A. Leitgeb”; “Special thanks to: Adidas, Pat Campbell, Paul Culberg, Andreas Falscher, Dwayne Meltzer, Sigrid Narjes, Bernie Orenstein, Michelle Pazer, Bill Perrault, Lea Pressman, David Pierce, David Rennie, Gina Resnick, Pam Rhode, Peter Schlessel, James Tauber, Saul Turteltaub, Manfred Wenzel, Henry Winkler, Jim Wynorski, the mayors & citizens of Kulmbach and Thurnau, Germany”; “Transportation to and from Germany provided by LTU International Airways, Peter Herbst.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
12 Jul 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jul 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 1990
p. 13, 54.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Nov 1991
pp. 11-12.
LA Reader
15 Nov 1991
p. 16.
Los Angeles Times
15 Nov 1991
p. 8.
Screen International
2 Jun 1990.
---
Screen International
24 Nov 1990.
---
Variety
6 May 1991.
---
Variety
17 Jun 1991
p. 69.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Motion Picture Corporation of America Presents
A Brad Krevoy/Steven Stabler Production
A Jon Turteltaub Film
A Motion Picture Corporation of America Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Dir, 2d unit
Prod mgr, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Co-prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
3rd asst cam
Gaffer
Best boy elec
3rd elec
Key grip
Dolly grip
Elec swing
Best boy grip
Still photog
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Clapper/loader, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Elec, 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod des, 2d unit
Draftsperson
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Assoc ed
Post-prod supv
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative conforming by
Negative conforming, Magic Film and Video Works
Negative conforming, Magic Film and Video Works
SET DECORATORS
Set dresser
Set dresser
Scenic
Scenic
Prop builder
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Lead swing
Swing
Swing
Prop master
Asst prop master
Prop intern
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Cost asst
Cost des, 2d unit
Ward, 2d unit
MUSIC
Phonogram mus coord
Phonogram mus coord
Phonogram mus coord
Mus courtesy of
Cologne, Germany
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
2d boom op
Sd mixer, 2d unit
Boom op, 2d unit
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Digital transfer eng
Digital transfer eng
ADR programmer
ADR rec
Foley rec
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff coord
Optical eff by
Titles by
MAKEUP
Key makeup/Hair
Makeup/Hair for Mr. Williams
Asst makeup
Makeup, 2d unit
Makeup, 2d unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Casting dir
Driver
Loc mgr
Scr supv
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Asst to the dir
Asst to Mr. Gottschalk
Prod accountant
Distribution liaison
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Intern
Intern
Security
Catering and craft service
Prod supv (Germany), 2d unit
Prod supv (Germany), 2d unit
Prod coord, 2d unit
Loc mgr, 2d unit
Scr supv, 2d unit
Transportation capt, 2d unit
P.A., 2d unit
Banking services provided by
Banking services provided by, California United Ba
Banking services provided by, California United Ba
Legal services provided by
Legal services provided by, Keck, Mahin and Cate
Bookkeeping services provided by
Accounting services provided by, Cannon and Compan
Accounting services provided by
Completion guarantee provided by
Completion guarantee provided by, Film Finances
Completion guarantee provided by, Film Finances
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord, 2d unit
Stunt driver, 2d unit
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
Beethoven: “Symphony #5, Opus 68 ‘Pastorale’,” conducted by Bernard Haitink, Philips Classics
Steve Thomson: “Blazing Heart,” by Balin/Thomson, published by Balin Music/Polygram Songs/Voxon Music, produced by Joey Balin
Beethoven: “Symphony #2, Opus 35,” conducted by Bernard Haitink, Philips Classics
+
SONGS
Beethoven: “Symphony #5, Opus 68 ‘Pastorale’,” conducted by Bernard Haitink, Philips Classics
Steve Thomson: “Blazing Heart,” by Balin/Thomson, published by Balin Music/Polygram Songs/Voxon Music, produced by Joey Balin
Beethoven: “Symphony #2, Opus 35,” conducted by Bernard Haitink, Philips Classics
Frumpy: “What It Is,” by Frumpy/Muller, published by Polygram Songs, produced by Carsten Bohn/Ronald Prent
Mozart: “Dies Irae” and “Introitus” from Requiem KV626, conducted by Peter Schreier, Philips Classics
Ulf Kreuger: “Dr. No,” by Ulf Kreuger, published by Edition Dagobert/Warner Chappell, produced by Lorenz Westphal/Klaus Voorman
Nadieh: “Words,” by Nadieh/Balin, published by EMI/Balin Music, Polygram Songs, produced by Joey Balin
Elton John: “I'm Still Standing,” by John/Taupin, published by Big Pig Music Ltd., produced by Chris Thomas
Nina Hagan: “Super Freak Family,” by Hagan/Liesegang, published by Axel Schwartzberg, produced by Zeus B. Held
Warlock: “I Rule The Ruins,” by Balin/Pesch, published by Schacht Music, produced by Joey Balin
Al Corley: “Real Life,” by Corley/Balin/Merendino, published by Warner Chappell/Balin Music/Polygram Songs, produced by Joey Balin
Z-Boy: “Slow Ride” by Joey Balin, published by Balin Music/Polygram Songs, produced by Joey Balin
Ulf Krueger: “Autofahr’n,” by Ulf Krueger, published by Edition Dagobert/Warner Chappell, produced by Lorenz Westphal/Klaus Voorman
Yello: “Stalakdrama,” by Blank/Meier, published by Neue Welt Musikverlag, produced by Yello
Frumpy: “One World,” by Frumpy/Muller/We Men, published by Polygram Songs, produced by Carsten Bohn/Ronald Prent
David Knopfler: “Lonely is the Night,” by David Knopfler, published by Dormant Music Ltd., Warner Chappell, produced by David Knopfler
Nadja Petrick: “Jumpin' So High,” by Nadja Petrick, published by Warner Chappell, produced by Joey Balin
Joey Balin: “That's What She Said,” by Joey Balin, published by Balin Music/Polygram Songs, produced by Joey Balin
Rainbirds: “On The Balcony,” by Katharina Franck, published by Intro Music, produced by Udo Arnt
Stephan Eicher: “Come On Home,” by Stephan Eicher, published by Unicorn, produced by Joseph Baldassare
Soundtrack available on Phonogram (Polygram) records, tapes, and C.D.s.
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Autobahn
Trabbi Goes to Hollywood
Release Date:
15 November 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 15 November 1991
Production Date:
5 July--October 1990
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded in Ultra-Stereo®
Color
Duration(in mins):
89
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31104
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the East German village of Engelswald, mechanic Gunther Schmidt converts a decrepit Trabant automobile, known as a “Trabbi,” into a high-performance vehicle powered by starchy vegetables. Following the reunification of Germany, Mayor Klein informs the townspeople that they need to raise $15 million to buy the land in and around the village. American businessman John McCready proposes purchasing the land for his company, promising the villagers full employment and a variety of retail stores. Gunther intends to sell his invention at an international automobile show in Los Angeles, California, and offers his barn as collateral for a loan from McCready to finance the trip. After Gunther arrives in Los Angeles, a criminal named Vince overhears him describing the Trabbi and steals it. Gunther enlists the help of parking attendant Max, a former car thief, promising him $1 million when the Trabbi is sold. The mechanic spends the night at the home of a neighbor’s niece, Frederika Hochstein, who has shortened her name to “Ricki Stein.” By morning, Gunther realizes he is infatuated with Ricki and gladly accepts her offer of dinner that evening. Later, while searching for his car, Gunther befriends a gangster named Omar, who directs him to Vince at the Eight Ball Bar. When Gunther and Max confront Vince, he warns that he is working for crime lord Mr. B, who sent Max to prison years earlier as revenge for leaving his employ. They chase Vince toward the exit, disrupting a pool game between a pair of brutes named Cubey and Bluto. Gunther and Max escape the ensuing brawl, and tackle Vince, who admits to ... +


In the East German village of Engelswald, mechanic Gunther Schmidt converts a decrepit Trabant automobile, known as a “Trabbi,” into a high-performance vehicle powered by starchy vegetables. Following the reunification of Germany, Mayor Klein informs the townspeople that they need to raise $15 million to buy the land in and around the village. American businessman John McCready proposes purchasing the land for his company, promising the villagers full employment and a variety of retail stores. Gunther intends to sell his invention at an international automobile show in Los Angeles, California, and offers his barn as collateral for a loan from McCready to finance the trip. After Gunther arrives in Los Angeles, a criminal named Vince overhears him describing the Trabbi and steals it. Gunther enlists the help of parking attendant Max, a former car thief, promising him $1 million when the Trabbi is sold. The mechanic spends the night at the home of a neighbor’s niece, Frederika Hochstein, who has shortened her name to “Ricki Stein.” By morning, Gunther realizes he is infatuated with Ricki and gladly accepts her offer of dinner that evening. Later, while searching for his car, Gunther befriends a gangster named Omar, who directs him to Vince at the Eight Ball Bar. When Gunther and Max confront Vince, he warns that he is working for crime lord Mr. B, who sent Max to prison years earlier as revenge for leaving his employ. They chase Vince toward the exit, disrupting a pool game between a pair of brutes named Cubey and Bluto. Gunther and Max escape the ensuing brawl, and tackle Vince, who admits to delivering the car to Mr. B for an auction the following day. After a failed attempt to break into Mr. B’s home, Max fears for his life and ends his partnership with Gunther. The mechanic is further disappointed when Ricki disregards their dinner plans for a date with her psychic advisor, Taj. Gunther walks along Hollywood Boulevard, and assumes that the stars on the sidewalk are gravemarkers. While sitting at a bar, he is accosted by Cubey, whom he challenges to a drinking contest. After several pints of beer, Cubey listens sympathetically as Gunther laments the loss of Ricki and his car. The next day, Gunther visits John McCready’s corporate offices in Los Angeles to relinquish the deed to his barn. He discovers a scale model of the pollution-spewing factory McCready plans for Engelswald, and telephones Otto, a fellow villager, warning him of the tycoon’s intentions. When Gunther returns to Ricki’s apartment, she apologizes for her rude behavior, and joins him in infiltrating Mr. B’s auction. Although they are discovered by Vince, Max intervenes and holds the criminals at gunpoint while Gunther binds them together. Max takes over the auction and sells the Trabbi for $16 million to an executive named Mr. Goodwyn. Afterward, Mr. B and Vince break free and take Ricki hostage. Following an exchange of gunfire, Gunther and Max escape in the Trabbi, with Mr. B and Goodwyn in pursuit. The chase ends with Mr. B holding Ricki at gunpoint on the roadside. Unable to convince Mr. Goodwyn that he is the inventor, Gunther destroys the Trabbi by driving it over an embankment. He survives the resulting explosion, and assures Mr. Goodwyn that he can build a replica. Goodwyn awards the $16 million to Gunther and threatens Mr. B with legal action. Gunther and Ricki kiss, while Max collects the money. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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