They All Come Out (1939)

68-70 mins | Drama | 14 July 1939

Director:

Jacques Tourneur

Producer:

Jack Chertok

Cinematographers:

Paul C. Vogel, Clyde De Vinna

Production Designer:

Elmer Sheeley

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The following dedication appeared in the opening credits of this film: "Dedicated to the United States Department of Justice, whose coöperation made this picture possible." In addition, the opening credits contain a statement claiming that this was the first film to feature "scenes actually photographed in our federal prisons." This claim is inaccurate, however, as there were other films prior to They All Come Out that used actual footage of federal prisons. According to Var and HR pre-release news items, M-G-M originally intended the film to be a four-reel documentary on the federal prison system. The picture was to have been a special short in Metro's "Crime Doesn't Pay" series, which was produced cooperatively with the Justice Department. Director Jacques Tourneur and cameraman Clyde DeVinna reportedly began filming prison scenes over a period of two months in the latter part of 1938. They All Come Out was eventually expanded to a feature-length film when M-G-M decided to add the plot of Joe and Kitty's romance. The film marked producer Jack Chertok's first feature film assignment. According to a contemporary source, some scenes were filmed on location at the Beverly Hills branch of the Bank of America; the U.S. Hospital for Defective Delinquents at Springfield, OH; the Women's Reformatory at Alderton, WV; the Federal Prison at Atlanta; the Chillicothe Ohio Reformatory; and at Alcatraz Prison. A contemporary NYT article notes that "a government policy against publicizing narcotic addiction, together with the Hays office, eliminated the Leavenworth annex from the ... More Less

The following dedication appeared in the opening credits of this film: "Dedicated to the United States Department of Justice, whose coöperation made this picture possible." In addition, the opening credits contain a statement claiming that this was the first film to feature "scenes actually photographed in our federal prisons." This claim is inaccurate, however, as there were other films prior to They All Come Out that used actual footage of federal prisons. According to Var and HR pre-release news items, M-G-M originally intended the film to be a four-reel documentary on the federal prison system. The picture was to have been a special short in Metro's "Crime Doesn't Pay" series, which was produced cooperatively with the Justice Department. Director Jacques Tourneur and cameraman Clyde DeVinna reportedly began filming prison scenes over a period of two months in the latter part of 1938. They All Come Out was eventually expanded to a feature-length film when M-G-M decided to add the plot of Joe and Kitty's romance. The film marked producer Jack Chertok's first feature film assignment. According to a contemporary source, some scenes were filmed on location at the Beverly Hills branch of the Bank of America; the U.S. Hospital for Defective Delinquents at Springfield, OH; the Women's Reformatory at Alderton, WV; the Federal Prison at Atlanta; the Chillicothe Ohio Reformatory; and at Alcatraz Prison. A contemporary NYT article notes that "a government policy against publicizing narcotic addiction, together with the Hays office, eliminated the Leavenworth annex from the story." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
30 Jun 39
p. 3.
Film Daily
4 Aug 39
p. 22.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jun 39
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jul 39
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
7 Jul 39
p. 7.
Motion Picture Herald
24 Jun 39
p. 47.
New York Times
10-Jan-39
---
New York Times
5-Feb-39
---
New York Times
3 Aug 39
p. 15.
Variety
10-Jan-39
---
Variety
5 Jul 39
p. 14.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Edward Chandler
Director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Orig story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
SOUND
Rec dir
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 July 1939
Production Date:
9 January--10 June 1939
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
11 July 1939
Copyright Number:
LP9068
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
68-70
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4796
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Former U.S. Attorney General Homer S. Cummings and James V. Bennett, Director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, relate the story of Clyde "Reno" Madigan and his gang to illustrate the rehabilitative potential of the prison system. Reno, a hardened, unregenerate criminal, heads a gang composed of George "Bugs" Jacklin, a soft-hearted and soft-headed thief; Albert "Groper" Crane, a psychotic gunman who suffers from delusions that women are hiding in his pocket; and Kitty Carson, Reno's moll. While casing a job in Birmingham one day, Kitty meets Joe Z. Cameron, a penniless drifter embittered by his treatment by the police, and she recruits him to drive the getaway car. After a daring hold-up of the bank, the gang takes refuge in an auto camp, while Reno and Joe bury the loot. Returning from their chore, Reno and Joe become embroiled in a shootout with the police, in which Kitty is wounded. Joe insists upon rescuing the wounded Kitty, and after leaving her with an old friend, the gang drives off. They are soon apprehended at the Alabama state line, however, and are sentenced to prison in Atlanta. In Atlanta, Reno tells Joe that he will split the bank loot with him upon their release. Meanwhile, Kitty, who has been turned in by her doctor, is sentenced to a women's prison, where she begins to learn the trade of a beautician. In Atlanta, prison authorities attempt to plot the rest of the gang's rehabilitation. They decide that Bugs's reformation lies in being united with his estranged wife and child. Joe, who has no criminal record, is sent to the Chillicothe, ... +


Former U.S. Attorney General Homer S. Cummings and James V. Bennett, Director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, relate the story of Clyde "Reno" Madigan and his gang to illustrate the rehabilitative potential of the prison system. Reno, a hardened, unregenerate criminal, heads a gang composed of George "Bugs" Jacklin, a soft-hearted and soft-headed thief; Albert "Groper" Crane, a psychotic gunman who suffers from delusions that women are hiding in his pocket; and Kitty Carson, Reno's moll. While casing a job in Birmingham one day, Kitty meets Joe Z. Cameron, a penniless drifter embittered by his treatment by the police, and she recruits him to drive the getaway car. After a daring hold-up of the bank, the gang takes refuge in an auto camp, while Reno and Joe bury the loot. Returning from their chore, Reno and Joe become embroiled in a shootout with the police, in which Kitty is wounded. Joe insists upon rescuing the wounded Kitty, and after leaving her with an old friend, the gang drives off. They are soon apprehended at the Alabama state line, however, and are sentenced to prison in Atlanta. In Atlanta, Reno tells Joe that he will split the bank loot with him upon their release. Meanwhile, Kitty, who has been turned in by her doctor, is sentenced to a women's prison, where she begins to learn the trade of a beautician. In Atlanta, prison authorities attempt to plot the rest of the gang's rehabilitation. They decide that Bugs's reformation lies in being united with his estranged wife and child. Joe, who has no criminal record, is sent to the Chillicothe, Ohio Industrial Reformatory, a prison for first offenders, where his injured arm is repaired and he is taught the trade of welding. Groper, suffering from persecution mania, is transferred to the Hospital for Defective Delinquents, where he is treated with occupational therapy. From their respective prisons, Kitty and Joe begin to correspond with each other, and Kitty is later paroled to work in a Cincinnati beauty shop. Reno is the only member of the gang that remains unregenerate, and is sentenced to Alcatraz after an attempted prison break. Before he leaves, he instructs his cellmate, Vonnie, to recover the money from Joe. After his release from jail, Vonnie visits Kitty and discovers that Joe is working for a welding company in Cleveland and forces Kitty to accompany him there. When Vonnie orders Joe at gunpoint to open his employer's safe, Joe attacks Vonnie with his blow torch and disables him. Kitty, fearing that she will be arrested for breaking her parole, tries to flee, but when the police arrive, they arrest Vonnie and praise the rehabilitation of Joe and Kitty, who decide to serve out the rest of their probation together in Cleveland. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.