The Neverending Story II: The Next Chapter (1991)

PG | 90 mins | Children's works, Fantasy | 8 February 1991

Director:

George Miller

Writer:

Karin Howard

Producer:

Dieter Geissler

Cinematographer:

Dave Connell

Production Designers:

Bob Laing, Gotz Weidner

Production Company:

The Neverending Story Films
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HISTORY

The Neverending Story II: The Next Chapter was the sequel to the 1984 German film, Die unendliche Geschichte (The Neverending Story), which grossed over $100 million in worldwide box-office receipts. As recounted by Christine Haase in When Heimat Meets Hollywood: German Filmmakers and America, 1985 – 2005 (Camden House, 2007), the first film, directed by Wolfgang Petersen, merged German storytelling with Hollywood production sensibilities. Financed jointly by German and American companies, the English-language picture was shot primarily in Germany, with special effects by the American company Industrial Light and Magic. With a budget of $27 million, The Neverending Story was one of Germany’s most expensive productions. The movie covered only half of Michael Ende’s best-selling children’s book, suggesting that filmmakers had a sequel in mind from the start.
       Ende was extremely critical of Petersen’s interpretation of his fantasy novel, and stated in the 27 Aug 1984 issue of People magazine that he was “horrified” at how the director had “changed the whole sense of the story.” However, as later reported in a 7 Jun 1989 Var article, Ende agreed, in 1987, to an adaptation of the remainder of the story. According to correspondence in AMPAS library files, Karin Howard’s completed script for The Neverending Story II: The Next Chapter was sent to Malcolm Mowbray on 11 Jul 1988. Producer Dieter Geissler and Warner Bros. Pictures were already attached to the film, with an anticipated a budget of $25 million. However, Mowbray did not become involved with the project.
       On 27 May 1989, Screen International announced that Australian director George Miller would helm the ... More Less

The Neverending Story II: The Next Chapter was the sequel to the 1984 German film, Die unendliche Geschichte (The Neverending Story), which grossed over $100 million in worldwide box-office receipts. As recounted by Christine Haase in When Heimat Meets Hollywood: German Filmmakers and America, 1985 – 2005 (Camden House, 2007), the first film, directed by Wolfgang Petersen, merged German storytelling with Hollywood production sensibilities. Financed jointly by German and American companies, the English-language picture was shot primarily in Germany, with special effects by the American company Industrial Light and Magic. With a budget of $27 million, The Neverending Story was one of Germany’s most expensive productions. The movie covered only half of Michael Ende’s best-selling children’s book, suggesting that filmmakers had a sequel in mind from the start.
       Ende was extremely critical of Petersen’s interpretation of his fantasy novel, and stated in the 27 Aug 1984 issue of People magazine that he was “horrified” at how the director had “changed the whole sense of the story.” However, as later reported in a 7 Jun 1989 Var article, Ende agreed, in 1987, to an adaptation of the remainder of the story. According to correspondence in AMPAS library files, Karin Howard’s completed script for The Neverending Story II: The Next Chapter was sent to Malcolm Mowbray on 11 Jul 1988. Producer Dieter Geissler and Warner Bros. Pictures were already attached to the film, with an anticipated a budget of $25 million. However, Mowbray did not become involved with the project.
       On 27 May 1989, Screen International announced that Australian director George Miller would helm the picture. Although Warner Bros. had not committed to domestic distribution, they acquired international distribution rights, and filmmakers planned to release the picture in Germany in fall 1990. Dieter Geissler explained to Var that domestic distribution would be sought once he had “twenty to thirty minutes of the film” to show.
       Principal photography began on 19 Jun 1989, by which time visual and special effects units had completed well over six months of work, according to various contemporary sources. Production took place primarily at Bavaria Film Studios in Munich, Germany. With the exception of actor Thomas Hill, who reprised his role as bookseller “Koreander,” the sequel was entirely recast.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files describe numerous improvements made to the puppet dragon, “Falkor,” from the original film. This time, five Falkors were built, and the creature-making team used more than one hundred pounds of mohair and 58,000 plastic scales to craft the different-sized dragons. The largest creature weighed two tons and measured nearly forty feet in length, and required a dozen puppeteers to control its movements. Individual parts such as the eyes, ears, lips, head, and neck could all be operated individually.
       On 31 Oct 1989, a full-page HR advertisement congratulated cast and crew on completing production. One year later, a 15 Oct 1990 Var news item announced that the 24 Oct world premiere of The Neverending Story II: The Next Chapter would be held in the 1,200-seat Zoopalast cinema in Berlin, Germany. A 30 Oct 1990 DV news item reported that the film took in $2.6 million over its “premiere weekend” in Germany, setting a record for its international distributor, Warner Bros. Box office results were also strong in Austria and Switzerland.
       Sometime after the picture’s European release, Warner Bros. acquired domestic distribution rights, and the movie opened in New York and Los Angeles on 8 Feb 1991. The domestic theatrical release included a five-minute animated short which preceded the film titled Box Office Bunny, featuring Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck, two popular Warner Bros. characters. According to a Feb 1991 LAT article, Box Office Bunny marked the “first theatrical Bugs Bunny cartoon since 1964.”
       The Neverending Story II: The Next Chapter received mixed reviews. Commentary written at the time of the film’s international release was more favorable than that written by U.S. press. The 25 Oct 1990 HR review commended the “perky, imaginative” sequel for allowing young “Bastian” to physically visit the land of “Fantasia.” (In the original film, Bastian merely reads about the imaginary world.) However, a review in the 9 Feb 1991 NYT called the picture a “mirthless fantasy film, made with great effort and no charm.” A similar contrast of opinion extended to composer Robert Folk’s score. While the 29 Oct 1990 Var claimed the picture’s “romantic musical score” was “a plus,” a 15 Feb 1991 review in Reader said it sounded “like new-age Richard Wagner.”
       End credits include the following production credit acknowledgement: “Memory Ball Machine, Flying Boat, Wambos, Xayide Throne, Fire Place, Xobile, Gondolas built by: Idome – Marty H. Niebler, Bernhard Bachmeier, Henry Geiger, Martin Schefer, Marcus Arneth, Andy Murr, Wolfgang Schenk, Stefan Wueler, Karin Thaler, Christian Wichmann, Harry Schuster, Christian Balnus, Bernd Eisenschenk, Tomas Blaher, Hans Hein, Stefan Schwarzmann, Horst Philip, Ulli Nasufi, Bertl Kecier, Rolf Puerner, Bernd Strasser, Leo Targowick, Alexander Schrott, Tommy Schrott, Karl Korb, Dr. Gans, Hans Huber, Angela Gerstner, Gabriele Niebler, Heribert Geier.”
       End credits state that the picture was: “Filmed at Bavaria Studio Munich and on location in Canada, Argentina, Australia, France, Italy.”
       End credits also include the following music credit: “Music performed by: Munich – Members of the Symphony Orchestra of the Bavarian Broadcasting Corporation; Bavarian State Orchestra; Orchestra of the Barvarian [sic] State Opera; Choir of the Bavarian State Opera; Berlin – Grosses Rundfunkorchester Berlin.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
6 Jun 1989.
---
Daily Variety
30 Oct 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jul 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 Oct 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Oct 1990
P. 5, 14.
Los Angeles Times
11 Feb 1991
Calendar, p. 10.
New York Times
9 Feb 1991
Section 1, p. 12.
People
27 Aug 1984.
---
Reader
15 Feb 1991.
---
Screen International
27 May 1989.
---
Variety
7 Jun 1989.
---
Variety
21 Jun 1989.
---
Variety
15 Oct 1990.
---
Variety
29 Oct 1991
p. 51.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. presents
a Dieter Geissler production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
Prod mgr
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
Prod mgr, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
1st asst dir, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
2d asst dir, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
3d asst dir, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Aerial cam
Focus puller
Clapper/Loader
Focus puller 2d cam
Clapper/Loader 2d cam
Video coord
Video op
Video op
Gaffer
Best boy
Stills photog
Gaffer, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Best boy, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Key grip, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Best boy, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Dolly grip, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Filmed in
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod des
Conceptual artist
Supv art dir
Storyboard artist
Art dir asst
Art dir asst
Art dir, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
2d asst ed
2d asst ed
Asst ed, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
SET DECORATORS
Matte painting consultant
Matte paintings by
of Illusion Arts
Matte paintings by
of Illusion Arts
Draftsman
Draftswoman
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Sculptor supv
Sculptor
Prop master
Prop buyer
Standby prop
Dressing propwoman
Prop buyer asst
Const coord, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Lead hand, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Head painter, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Lead hand painter, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Set dec, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Asst set dec, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Prop master, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Asst prop, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward asst
Ward supv, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
MUSIC
Mus/Orch
"Dreams We Dream" comp by
Mus ed
Mus mixed by
Mus mixed by
Addl orch by
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Boom op
Sd maintenance
Dial ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Chief dubbing mixer
Dubbing mixer
Dubbing mixer
Sd eff pre-mixing
Sd mixer, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Boom op, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
SFX coord, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec visual eff
Spec vis eff/Opt eff by
Spec visual eff
Creature spec eff animatronic
Conceptual creature des
Spec eff supv
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Wire eff tech
Visual eff ed
Dir of photog, Visual eff unit
Cam op, Visual eff unit
Focus puller, Visual eff unit
Clapper/Loader, Visual eff unit
Photog, Visual eff unit
Blue screen consultant, Visual eff unit
Blue screen consultant, Visual eff unit
Prod mgr, Visual eff unit
Asst dir, Visual eff unit
Financial controller, Visual eff unit
Prod accountant, Visual eff unit
Visual eff art dir, Visual eff unit
Draftsman, Visual eff unit
Senior spec eff, Visual eff unit
Spec eff tech, Visual eff unit
Spec eff tech, Visual eff unit
Addl matte paintings by, Visual eff unit
Addl matte paintings by, Visual eff unit
From the Neverending Story, Visual eff unit
From the Neverending Story, Visual eff unit
Opt cam, Opt eff unit
Opt cam, Opt eff unit
Opt cam, Opt eff unit
Motion control cam, Opt eff unit
Rostrum cam, Opt eff unit
Opt assembler, Opt eff unit
Rotoscope artist, Opt eff unit
Gaffer, Opt eff unit
Elec, Opt eff unit
Elec, Opt eff unit
Grip, Opt eff unit
Grip, Opt eff unit
Grip, Opt eff unit
Grip, Opt eff unit
Model workshop supv, Opt eff unit
Model des, Opt eff unit
Model maker, Opt eff unit
Model maker, Opt eff unit
Model maker, Opt eff unit
Model maker, Opt eff unit
Model maker, Opt eff unit
Model maker, Opt eff unit
Model maker, Opt eff unit
Model maker, Opt eff unit
Model maker, Opt eff unit
Model maker, Opt eff unit
Model maker, Opt eff unit
Model maker, Opt eff unit
Model maker, Opt eff unit
Unit mgr, Creature spec eff unit
Sculptor/Moulder, Creature spec eff unit
Sculptor/Moulder, Creature spec eff unit
Sculptor/Moulder, Creature spec eff unit
Sculptor/Moulder, Creature spec eff unit
Sculptor/Moulder, Creature spec eff unit
Sculptor/Moulder, Creature spec eff unit
Sculptor/Moulder, Creature spec eff unit
Animatronic/Mechanic, Creature spec eff unit
Animatronic/Mechanic, Creature spec eff unit
Animatronic/Mechanic, Creature spec eff unit
Animatronic/Mechanic, Creature spec eff unit
Animatronic/Mechanic, Creature spec eff unit
Animatronic/Mechanic, Creature spec eff unit
Animatronic/Mechanic, Creature spec eff unit
Animatronic/Mechanic, Creature spec eff unit
Animatronic/Mechanic, Creature spec eff unit
Animatronic/Mechanic, Creature spec eff unit
Animatronic/Mechanic, Creature spec eff unit
Animatronic/Mechanic, Creature spec eff unit
Animatronic/Mechanic, Creature spec eff unit
Creature assembler, Creature spec eff unit
Creature assembler, Creature spec eff unit
Creature assembler, Creature spec eff unit
Creature assembler, Creature spec eff unit
Creature assembler, Creature spec eff unit
Creature assembler, Creature spec eff unit
Creature painter, Creature spec eff unit
Tool storekeeper, Creature spec eff unit
Tool storekeeper, Creature spec eff unit
Creature makeup asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature makeup asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature makeup asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature makeup asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature makeup asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature ward asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature ward asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature ward asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature ward asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature ward asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature ward asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature ward asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature ward asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature asst, Creature spec eff unit
Creature asst, Creature spec eff unit
Puppeteer coord, Creature spec eff unit
DANCE
MAKEUP
Creature spec eff makeup
Chief makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Creature makeup artist
Creature makeup artist
Creature makeup artist
Creature makeup artist
Creature makeup artist
Makeup artist, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Hairdresser, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Mrs. Clarissa Burt's hairdesign by
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod exec
Exec in charge of prod
Prod supv
Supv accountant
Dial coach
Scr consultant
Prod secy
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod secy
Studio teacher
Studio teacher
Scr supv
Horse master
Horse master asst
Horse master asst
Casting Germany
Casting UK
Crowd marshall
Casting re-voicing
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Prod service Vancouver by
Consulting prod, Cinetel Film Prod Ltd.
Accounting, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Casting, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Casting assoc, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Loc mgr, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Asst loc mgr, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Craft service, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd.
Transportation coord, Cinetel Film Productions Ltd
Prod services Iguazu, Argentina by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Neverending Story by Michael Ende, translated by Ralph Manheim (Garden City, 1983).
SONGS
"Dreams We Dream," composed by Giorgio Moroder, sung by Joe Milner
"Heaven's Just A Heartbeat," composed by Giorgio Moroder, sung by Joe Milner
"The Neverending Story," composed by Giorgio Moroder, sung by Joe Milner.
PERFORMER
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
8 February 1991
Premiere Information:
Berlin, Germany world premiere: 24 October 1990
Los Angeles and New York openings: 8 February 1991
Production Date:
19 June--31 October 1989
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc. and Scriba & Deyhle, O.H.G.
Copyright Date:
26 April 1991
Copyright Number:
PA517337
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
90
MPAA Rating:
PG
Countries:
Germany (West), United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30245
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Home alone and full of imagination, young Bastian Bux makes a mess in the kitchen while reenacting a heroic role from a German fairy tale. His father, Barney, arrives home from work and is exasperated at the disarray. Later, Bastian tries out for the school swim team, but when the coach asks him to jump from the high dive, the boy claims he has a cramp. That night, when his father asks about the tryouts, Bastian refuses to acknowledge he was too scared to jump. Barney mocks his son’s tattered sweater vest, and Bastian reminds his father that it was a gift from his mother. When Barney leaves for the evening, Bastian goes to his room and gazes tearfully at his mother’s picture. The next day, the boy visits an antique bookshop run by old Mr. Koreander, and he asks for a book to help him overcome his fear of heights. As Koreander searches the shop, Bastian notices an ornately embossed book sitting on the desk, and recognizes the title, The Neverending Story, as one he has already read. The bookseller suggests that books change when read a second time, and Bastian insists on borrowing it. When he returns home, Bastian magically loosens the intertwined snake design from the book’s cover. He tucks the ornament, called “the Auryn,” into his shirt and opens the book. A young girl’s voice beckons him to Fantasia, and moments later, Bastian finds himself on a small boat floating toward Silver City. Meanwhile, the evil sorceress Xayide learns of Bastian’s arrival in Fantasia and consults her advisor, Tri Face, about an invention called the Memory Machine. Tri Face explains that every time ... +


Home alone and full of imagination, young Bastian Bux makes a mess in the kitchen while reenacting a heroic role from a German fairy tale. His father, Barney, arrives home from work and is exasperated at the disarray. Later, Bastian tries out for the school swim team, but when the coach asks him to jump from the high dive, the boy claims he has a cramp. That night, when his father asks about the tryouts, Bastian refuses to acknowledge he was too scared to jump. Barney mocks his son’s tattered sweater vest, and Bastian reminds his father that it was a gift from his mother. When Barney leaves for the evening, Bastian goes to his room and gazes tearfully at his mother’s picture. The next day, the boy visits an antique bookshop run by old Mr. Koreander, and he asks for a book to help him overcome his fear of heights. As Koreander searches the shop, Bastian notices an ornately embossed book sitting on the desk, and recognizes the title, The Neverending Story, as one he has already read. The bookseller suggests that books change when read a second time, and Bastian insists on borrowing it. When he returns home, Bastian magically loosens the intertwined snake design from the book’s cover. He tucks the ornament, called “the Auryn,” into his shirt and opens the book. A young girl’s voice beckons him to Fantasia, and moments later, Bastian finds himself on a small boat floating toward Silver City. Meanwhile, the evil sorceress Xayide learns of Bastian’s arrival in Fantasia and consults her advisor, Tri Face, about an invention called the Memory Machine. Tri Face explains that every time Bastian makes a wish using the Auryn, the boy will lose a memory, until he forgets the reason he came to Fantasia. Xayide sends her pet bird, Nimbly, to coerce the boy into using the Auryn. However, Bastian is too intrigued by the people of Fantasia to pay attention to Nimbly. Just then, sharp-clawed giants break through the city’s marble floor. Nimbly urges the boy to wish himself to safety, but Bastian climbs a rope to the rooftop, leaving the merciless giants below. Proud of his newfound strength, the boy leans against a wall, which suddenly opens, and he tumbles into an underground room. There, four unusual creatures open a communication portal to the Ivory Tower, where the Childlike Empress tells Bastian about a strange force that has infected Fantasia with apathy. She asks Bastian to use the Auryn to save both of their worlds. Meanwhile, Barney Bux goes to his son’s room, which is empty except for the open book lying on the bed. He picks it up and notices Mr. Koreander’s name on the inside cover. Back in Fantasia, Bastian pleads with the citizens of Silver City to show courage. A young warrior named Atreyu rides forward on a white horse, and informs Bastian that the sharp-clawed giants come from the sorceress Xayide’s castle. Bastian uses the Auryn to wish for a ferocious green dragon named Smurg to take him to the castle. However, Smurg breathes fire on everything, and flies away. Atreyu gives chase on horseback. Amidst the commotion, Bastian is overjoyed to see his old friend, Falkor. The furry white dragon transports Bastian across Fantasia in pursuit of Smurg. While soaring past Xayide’s castle, they see a laser beam destroy Smurg. Falkor insists he needs to rest, and drops Bastian at the feet of Rock Biter. The gentle giant tells Bastian that the rocks, once so delicious, are no longer nourishing, and Bastian concludes that the unnamed force is responsible. Sometime later, Atreyu meets up with Bastian, Falkor, and Rock Biter. The young warrior lifts two large bags from his horse and informs Bastian that they contain an army of warriors who will help storm the castle. Bastian is skeptical about the size of this “army,” but strategizes with Atreyu as they sit around the campfire. When Falkor asks Bastian if he misses anyone, the boy tells his friends about his dead mother. The dragon urges Bastian to hold on to his memories, even those of make-believe worlds like Fantasia. Later that night, Atreyu and Bastian attempt to sneak into Xayide’s castle, but Xayide learns of the intruders’ presence and sends the sharp-clawed giants to the front gate. Atreyu releases the contents of the two bags, and an “army” of mechanical toys distracts the giants, allowing Bastian to sneak through. Not seeing a way into the castle tower, Bastian uses the Auryn to wish a series of steps on the exterior of the structure. However, each step requires a wish, and Xayide watches in delight as the Memory Machine fills with Bastian’s memories. Once inside the castle, Bastian finds Atreyu in chains. He rescues his friend, and the two boys battle more giants. They observe the hollow remains of a fallen creature, and Bastian names the malevolent force affecting Fantasia, “the Emptiness.” Bastian and Atreyu confront Xayide in her throne room, demanding that she undo her evil spell. Meanwhile, in the real world, Barney Bux becomes concerned about his missing son, and visits Mr. Koreander’s bookshop to ask about The Neverending Story. Koreander suggests he might enjoy the book, but Barney considers it a fantasy. However, the book falls open, and Barney notices Bastian’s name on the page. He returns home and starts reading about his son’s heroic adventures. Back in Fantasia, Xayide agrees to comply with Bastian, and invites him to travel with her to the Ivory Tower, where she promises to undo her spell. During the trip, Atreyu notices they are going in circles, but when he draws Bastian’s attention to that fact, his friend is dismissive. Alone with Xayide, Bastian confesses that he is having a hard time remembering things. The sorceress encourages Bastian to make a wish when memory fails him. Atreyu overhears the conversation and deduces that Bastian’s use of the Auryn is depleting his mind of memories. He realizes he must convince Bastian of Xayide’s deceit. However, Xayide persuades Bastian that Atreyu is jealous of him, and when the two boys meet, they argue and fight. Bastian pushes Atreyu over a cliff, before returning to Xayide’s chariot and discovering that his friend’s warnings were true. Horrified, he tries to find Atreyu, but Falkor has already flown away with the unconscious warrior. Bastian gives chase on Atreyu’s horse, but soon becomes lost and exhausted. As regions of Fantasia collapse in darkness and ruin, Nimbly decides to help the boy. The bird shows Bastian the path to Silver City, where Falkor and Atreyu await. However, by the time he arrives, the city is in ruins. Bastian uses one of two remaining wishes to revive Atreyu. Triumphant, Xayide appears and insists that Bastian use his last wish to return home. Instead, he wishes for Xayide to have a heart. Overcome with emotion, the evil sorceress is destroyed, and the spell cast upon Fantasia breaks. The world returns to its splendor, and the Childlike Empress congratulates Bastian on his newfound courage. Bastian says goodbye to his friends and returns home, where he embraces his father and tells him he loves him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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