The Perfect Match (1988)

PG | 92 mins | Romantic comedy | 27 May 1988

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HISTORY

Producer-writer-director Mark Deimel made his theatrical feature film debut with Perfect Match, although he previously wrote, directed, and produced A House Divided, a feature-length picture for the “non-theatrical religious market,” as stated in a 22 Aug 1986 HR item.
       Deimel formed a limited partnership with family and friends to raise the $875,000 budget, and began filming on 3 Jun 1986 in Southern CA, according to the 15 Jul 1986 HR production chart.
       Perfect Match was screened on 3 Jun 1987 at the Seattle Film Festival. Almost a year later, it had a short-lived, poorly received theatrical release in Los Angeles, CA, where it opened on 27 May 1988, and New York City, where it opened on 3 Jun 1988. By late Jun 1988, the film was released on home video, according to a 30 Jun 1988 Philadelphia Inquirer item.
       Special effects crew member Tassilo Baur's name is misspelled "Tassllo Baur" in end credits. The film is dedicated "in memory of June Torrance." “Special Thanks” are given to: Kirsten A. Saxlund; Mark & Gwen Saxlund; Teri & Emily Deimel; Sharon M. Vaughan; Kenneth R. Lewis; Arvid & Barbara Kretz; Peter & John Deimel; Arnold C. Adauto; Kelly M. Kennemer; Christopher & Patricia Kent; Timothy J. Carlson; Fremont & Alice Healy; H. David Carranza; Mack & Beverly Carlson; Lawrence R. Lewis; William & Luzviminda Diaz; Charles & Helen DeBerard; Peggy Sheriff; Scott E. Sexton; James H. Wallace; William H. Gilmore; Martha E. Paladino; Randall & Kaylene Sanada; Vince M. Sanada; Brian & Judy Smith; Sheldon J. Sanada; Eric Young; Susan F. Sloat; William ... More Less

Producer-writer-director Mark Deimel made his theatrical feature film debut with Perfect Match, although he previously wrote, directed, and produced A House Divided, a feature-length picture for the “non-theatrical religious market,” as stated in a 22 Aug 1986 HR item.
       Deimel formed a limited partnership with family and friends to raise the $875,000 budget, and began filming on 3 Jun 1986 in Southern CA, according to the 15 Jul 1986 HR production chart.
       Perfect Match was screened on 3 Jun 1987 at the Seattle Film Festival. Almost a year later, it had a short-lived, poorly received theatrical release in Los Angeles, CA, where it opened on 27 May 1988, and New York City, where it opened on 3 Jun 1988. By late Jun 1988, the film was released on home video, according to a 30 Jun 1988 Philadelphia Inquirer item.
       Special effects crew member Tassilo Baur's name is misspelled "Tassllo Baur" in end credits. The film is dedicated "in memory of June Torrance." “Special Thanks” are given to: Kirsten A. Saxlund; Mark & Gwen Saxlund; Teri & Emily Deimel; Sharon M. Vaughan; Kenneth R. Lewis; Arvid & Barbara Kretz; Peter & John Deimel; Arnold C. Adauto; Kelly M. Kennemer; Christopher & Patricia Kent; Timothy J. Carlson; Fremont & Alice Healy; H. David Carranza; Mack & Beverly Carlson; Lawrence R. Lewis; William & Luzviminda Diaz; Charles & Helen DeBerard; Peggy Sheriff; Scott E. Sexton; James H. Wallace; William H. Gilmore; Martha E. Paladino; Randall & Kaylene Sanada; Vince M. Sanada; Brian & Judy Smith; Sheldon J. Sanada; Eric Young; Susan F. Sloat; William S. Torrance; Robert Wyman & Lisa Krueger; George Scott; Joseph Schroeder; John S. Caragozian; Ronald H. Furuyama; Michael F. Brown; Mark & Patricia Sachar; Sandy Siegel & Cynthia Michaud; Bert Engelhardt; Ben Lederman; Seymour & Martha Siegel; MacFarlane Lambert Inc.; Arleen Bedo; Mammoth Film Commission; DISC; Inn of the Seventh Ray; Southland Corporation; Insight Entertainment; L.A. Reader; Unique Product Placement; Creative Film Promotions; Doug Brignole; Coca-Cola Company; Kerry Brennan; Brignole Health Spa; Gordon Peele; Tower Video; Alan Deremo; Eric Marienthal; Bruce Markoe; Bill Mings; Steve Shkolnik; Danna Mongoven; Bob & Sharon Moore; Randy Brenner; John Nyberg; Pat Clerk; Our families and friends; American Film Promotions. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Aug 1986
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Nov 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
27 May 1988
Calendar, p. 4.
New York Times
4 Jun 1988
p. 1, 12.
Philadelphia Inquirer
30 Jun 1988
Section E, p. 3.
Seattle Times
3 Jun 1987
Section G, p. 6.
Variety
10 Jun 1987
p. 11.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
An Airtight Production
Airtight Productions Presents
A Mark Deimel Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir (Mammoth)
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Addl photog (Mammoth)
Addl photog (Mammoth)
Elec best boy
Elec best boy
Elec best boy
Elec best boy
Elec best boy
Lighting tech
Generator op (Mammoth)
Key grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Asst cam, 2d unit crew
Asst cam, 2d unit crew
Asst cam, 2d unit crew
Gaffer, 2d unit crew
Key grip, 2d unit crew
Arriflex cameras and lenses by
Arriflex cameras and lenses by
Lighting and grip equip by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set painter
Prop master
Prop asst
COSTUMES
Ward asst
Jennifer Edwards' eveningwear by
Jennifer Edwards' eveningwear by
Marc McClure's eveningwear by
Beverly Hills
Ski sweaters and hats provided by
Ski sweaters and hats provided by
MUSIC
Mus prod, rec and performed by
at Big Music, Van Nuys
Mus mixed by
Mus mixed by
Synclavier programmed by
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Sd mixer, 2d unit crew
Boom op, 2d unit crew
Boom op, 2d unit crew
Sd des
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd asst
Sd asst
Foley walker
Foley walker
ADR/Foley mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec at
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup/Hair
Jennifer Edwards's spec hair
Makeup/Hair, 2d unit crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Extras casting
Addl casting
Scr supv
Craft services
Catering
Prod asst
Prod consultant
Accounting and payroll services
Basketball footage courtesy
Ballet footage courtesy
STAND INS
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timing
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Save My Heart," performed by Zezel, written by Danny Sembello, Don Freeman and David Batteau, courtesy of Unicity Music/Warner-Tamerlane/David Batteau Music
"Even If," performed by Don Freeman, written by Don Freeman and Richard Scott, courtesy of Warner-Tamerlane/Richard Scott Publishing
"Don't Say If," performed by Lee Rocker, Jim Phantom and Tim Torrance, written by Lee Rocker and Jim Phantom, courtesy of Hot Beef Hits
+
SONGS
"Save My Heart," performed by Zezel, written by Danny Sembello, Don Freeman and David Batteau, courtesy of Unicity Music/Warner-Tamerlane/David Batteau Music
"Even If," performed by Don Freeman, written by Don Freeman and Richard Scott, courtesy of Warner-Tamerlane/Richard Scott Publishing
"Don't Say If," performed by Lee Rocker, Jim Phantom and Tim Torrance, written by Lee Rocker and Jim Phantom, courtesy of Hot Beef Hits
"Take Your Lovin' Somewhere Else," performed by Dian Sorel, written by Sandy Siegel and Barry Levy, courtesy of Cynful Songs
"Under Cover," performed by Lindy Wilson, written by Sandy Siegel, George Daly and Lindy Wilson, courtesy of Cynful Songs and Redleather Yellowleather
"Polovestian Dances," by Alexander Borodin
"Sometimes Perfection," performed by Mitch Crane, written by Tim Torrance and Duncan Pain, courtesy of AFG and Tim Torrance Music.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 May 1988
Premiere Information:
Seattle Film Festival screening: 3 June 1987
Los Angeles opening: 27 May 1988
New York opening: 3 June 1988
Production Date:
began 3 June 1986
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
92
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Twenty-something Tim Wainwright goes on a date with Jeannine, a crass but attractive woman he met on the unemployment line. Tim is briefly convinced that he and Jeannine were fated for each other until she steals his car. Dejected, he returns home to his messy apartment and engages in his nightly ritual of drinking Coca-Cola with four ice cubes and watching basketball on television. Elsewhere, Nancy Bryant languishes in her job as a video store clerk. Her co-worker, Vicky, encourages her to date more, but the terminally shy Nancy, who is in her tenth year of college, wants romance to happen naturally. Tim gets a job at a big corporation and decides to place a “Loveline” personal advertisement in the local newspaper. He tries to seduce the woman who sells him the ad by claiming a variety of interests, including tennis, skiing, horseback riding, and theater, but the woman reveals she is a homebody. At the video store, Vicky sees Tim’s listing, calls his number, and forces Nancy to talk to him. Nancy is intrigued by his purported interests and agrees to a date. When they meet, they try to impress each other by lying about their professions: Tim claims to own a company, and Nancy claims to be a professor, not a student. They go to a fancy restaurant, where Nancy, a staunch vegetarian, is repulsed by Tim’s order of veal, so he orders something else to appease her. Later, he drops her off at her tidy apartment, and they kiss. However, she stops him from going any further because she would like to build a relationship first. Tim leaves, frustrated. The next day, Nancy informs ... +


Twenty-something Tim Wainwright goes on a date with Jeannine, a crass but attractive woman he met on the unemployment line. Tim is briefly convinced that he and Jeannine were fated for each other until she steals his car. Dejected, he returns home to his messy apartment and engages in his nightly ritual of drinking Coca-Cola with four ice cubes and watching basketball on television. Elsewhere, Nancy Bryant languishes in her job as a video store clerk. Her co-worker, Vicky, encourages her to date more, but the terminally shy Nancy, who is in her tenth year of college, wants romance to happen naturally. Tim gets a job at a big corporation and decides to place a “Loveline” personal advertisement in the local newspaper. He tries to seduce the woman who sells him the ad by claiming a variety of interests, including tennis, skiing, horseback riding, and theater, but the woman reveals she is a homebody. At the video store, Vicky sees Tim’s listing, calls his number, and forces Nancy to talk to him. Nancy is intrigued by his purported interests and agrees to a date. When they meet, they try to impress each other by lying about their professions: Tim claims to own a company, and Nancy claims to be a professor, not a student. They go to a fancy restaurant, where Nancy, a staunch vegetarian, is repulsed by Tim’s order of veal, so he orders something else to appease her. Later, he drops her off at her tidy apartment, and they kiss. However, she stops him from going any further because she would like to build a relationship first. Tim leaves, frustrated. The next day, Nancy informs Vicky that she and Tim were not a good match. Soon after, she accidentally calls his number, and they arrange a second date. This time, they enjoy each other’s company at a health-food restaurant and classical music concert. Back at Nancy’s apartment, she offers Tim a drink, but he asks for Coca-Cola – something she would never keep in the house. Tim notices a photograph of Nancy’s parents taken in the Sequoia National Forest, where they spent a long weekend before getting married. Nancy believes a long weekend is a good way to get to know someone, and Tim agrees. She suggests a mountain resort where they could do all the activities Tim mentioned in his ad. That weekend, they arrive at the resort, where Tim has booked separate bedrooms at Nancy’s behest. Although they both claim to have skied, Nancy is unable to get off the chairlift and both fall and injure themselves on the mountain. Tim pays extra fees for their broken ski poles. After dinner, they dance at a nightclub, but Nancy is knocked over on the dance floor and Tim is hit, too. The following evening, they hobble onto a tennis court, where Tim hits a ball into an overhead light, causing the court to go dark. Nancy goes to his hotel room later, and spies him watching a basketball game. Amused by his enthusiasm, she leaves him alone. On the final day of their trip, they go camping. Having lied about his outdoors skills, too, Tim accidentally sets Nancy’s tent and her supplies, including dinner, on fire. A rainstorm hits, and the two argue inside Tim’s tent. Nancy accuses him of lying about his hobbies, and he accuses her of doing the same. They trudge back to the car in the rain and are thwarted again by a flat tire. The ruined camping equipment costs Tim hundreds of dollars. He and Nancy return home with colds. Nancy gets a call from the dean of her college, informing her that she has exceeded the amount of class credits for one student and will be automatically graduated. Depressed and sick, she strays from her normal routine by watching a basketball game on television. Meanwhile, Tim switches television channels until he finds a black-and-white romantic comedy. At the video store, Vicky resumes pestering Nancy about her dating life. Nancy loses her temper with Vicky and her boss, and quits her job. She goes to Tim’s apartment to give him a check for half the rental equipment, but he rejects her money. She reveals that she is just a student, who will soon be forced into the real world. Tim confesses he does not own his own business. She suggests they try dating again, as their true selves, but Tim balks. He points to a magazine ad and claims he is dating the model. Later, Tim’s mother cleans his apartment. He announces that he wants to start taking care of himself like an adult. Tim admits he sabotaged the relationship with Nancy by lying. His mother shows him a photograph of her and Tim’s late father, who refused to dance until they had been married twenty years. She acknowledges that they had their differences, but praises him for making little efforts to please her, like bringing her flowers in the middle of the night. Tim wonders how he will know if someone is right for him, and his mother says that God will send him small signs. At 2 a.m., Tim wakes Nancy up with flowers. He apologizes for hurting her, and promises that the lie about dating a model was his last. They kiss. She invites Tim to help himself to a drink, and he finds Coca-Cola in her refrigerator. He pours them both a glass, but puts only three ice cubes in her drink. They toast to their relationship, and Nancy surprises Tim by adding a fourth ice cube to her glass. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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