Queens Logic (1991)

R | 116 mins | Comedy-drama | 1 February 1991

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HISTORY

The 26 Apr 1989 DV announced the start of principal photography in mid-Jul 1989, and the 21 May 1989 LAT included Nicolas Cage and Elizabeth Perkins among the cast, with the addition of Helen Hunt reported in the 25 Jun 1989 LAT. Participation by the three actors has not been determined, and none were credited onscreen. The 2 Jul 1989 LAT inaccurately described the character played by actress Jamie Lee Curtis as “a flipped-out Californian.”
       Principal photography began 10 Jul 1989 in Queens, NY, as stated in the 14 Jul 1989 HR. Production notes in AMPAS library files state that, during the course of the shoot, the cast met several people upon which the characters in the screenplay were based. Director Steve Rash noted that Queens is “one of the noisiest areas in America,” due to its close proximity to two airports and a power plant, so a considerable amount of noise was added to the soundtrack to give the film an air of authenticity. After three weeks in Queens, the production began an additional three weeks at the Warner Bros. Hollywood Studios in West Hollywood, CA. The largest sets were the apartment where much of the action takes place, and a backyard with adjacent buildings, reproduced from exteriors filmed in Queens. A rooftop set was built on the studio’s Stage 1, surrounded by neighboring buildings, reduced in size by approximately twenty-five percent, “to give the set the proper sense of scale and proportion.” Following the completion of principal photography, a second unit crew returned to Queens to film ... More Less

The 26 Apr 1989 DV announced the start of principal photography in mid-Jul 1989, and the 21 May 1989 LAT included Nicolas Cage and Elizabeth Perkins among the cast, with the addition of Helen Hunt reported in the 25 Jun 1989 LAT. Participation by the three actors has not been determined, and none were credited onscreen. The 2 Jul 1989 LAT inaccurately described the character played by actress Jamie Lee Curtis as “a flipped-out Californian.”
       Principal photography began 10 Jul 1989 in Queens, NY, as stated in the 14 Jul 1989 HR. Production notes in AMPAS library files state that, during the course of the shoot, the cast met several people upon which the characters in the screenplay were based. Director Steve Rash noted that Queens is “one of the noisiest areas in America,” due to its close proximity to two airports and a power plant, so a considerable amount of noise was added to the soundtrack to give the film an air of authenticity. After three weeks in Queens, the production began an additional three weeks at the Warner Bros. Hollywood Studios in West Hollywood, CA. The largest sets were the apartment where much of the action takes place, and a backyard with adjacent buildings, reproduced from exteriors filmed in Queens. A rooftop set was built on the studio’s Stage 1, surrounded by neighboring buildings, reduced in size by approximately twenty-five percent, “to give the set the proper sense of scale and proportion.” Following the completion of principal photography, a second unit crew returned to Queens to film the stunt sequences at the Hell Gate Bridge. Shooting was delayed when a barge struck the bridge and spilled oil into the river, resulting in a temporary evacuation of the area.
       Queens Logic was released 1 Feb 1991 to mostly negative reviews, several of which compared it unfavorably to The Big Chill (1983, see entry).
       End credits include the following statements: “The paintings of Vincent Desiderio appear courtesy of Land & O’Hara Gallery, Soho, NY”; “The producers gratefully acknowledge the following for their assistance: New York City Mayor’s Office of Film, Theater & Broadcasting, Jayne C. Keyes, Director; Silvercup Studios; Amtrak; Andrew S. Karsch; Tracy Friedman; Don Grierson; Larry Stessel; Kathe Malta; Wyman, Bautzer, Kuchel & Silbert”; “The producers wish to recognize the staff of New Visions Pictures: Scott Anderson, Lydia Ash, Jim Blatchley, Gina Blumenfeld, Benita Cruz, Cheri Cruz, Leslie Devore, John Drinkwater, Ginny Durkin, Cathy Dwyer, Shirley Eaton, Carol Ellis, Drew Fleming, Cynthia Garcia, Adrienne Garland, Kathy Gill, Yvonne Gonzalez, Jacquie Holm, Rik Holt, Margaret Hunter, Wittie Hurd, Carol Huston, Sandy Jefferson, Missy Kelly, Karyl Kreizinger, Ruby Laygo, Lon Levin, Sindee Levin-Small, Deborah Lucchesi, Jenny Manriquez, Michelle May, David Melamed, Joe Miller, Mary Muckelroy, Cheryl Nelson, Mitch Ohye, Dan Padgett, Richard Reiner, Doree Reno, Francesca Riviere, Patti Schulman, Barbara Stelszner, Bernie Tabakin, Lina Villaflor, Madonna Wade."
       Actor Richard Kind is credited onscreen as "Rich Kind." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Apr 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Feb 1991
p. 12, 18.
Los Angeles Times
21 May 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
25 Jun 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
2 Jul 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
1 Feb 1991
Calendar, p. 8.
New York Times
1 Feb 1991
p. 13.
Variety
4 Feb 1991
pp. 87-88.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
New Visions Pictures presents
A Stuart Oken/Russ Smith production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
D.G.A. trainee
Unit prod mgr, New York crew
Asst unit prod mgr, New York crew
2d asst dir, New York crew
2d 2d asst dir, New York crew
2d unit dir, Bridge seq
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
2d asst cam, New York crew
2d asst cam, New York crew
Steadicam op, New York crew
Steadicam op, New York crew
Gaffer, New York crew
Best boy, New York crew
Key grip, New York crew
Best boy grip, New York crew
Dolly grip, New York crew
Still photog, New York crew
Dir of photog, Bridge seq
Asst cam, Bridge seq
2d cam, Bridge seq
Rigger, Bridge seq
Rigger, Bridge seq
Rigger, Bridge seq
Rigger, Bridge seq
Video, Bridge seq
Gaffer, Bridge seq
Best boy, Bridge seq
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Apprentice ed
Dir of post prod
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Prop master
Asst set dec
Asst set dec
Set dresser
Set const coord
Const coord
Const foreman
Scenic artist
Loc scenic artist
Set dec, New York crew
Lead man, New York crew
Set dresser, New York crew
Scenic artist, New York crew
Prop master, New York crew
Prop master, Bridge seq
Vinny's Backyard set by
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Set costumer
Ward supv, New York crew
Ward asst, New York crew
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus supv
Score rec and mixed at
New York, New York
Mus supv
Mus coord
Mus ed
Mus ed
Mus ed
Rec eng
Orig score prod, wrt, and arr by
Featured player
Featured player
Featured player
Featured player
Addl player
Engineered by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Runner
Re-rec at
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec
Re-rec eng
Dolby Stereo consultant
Sd boom op, New York crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff, New York crew
Main title des
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
2d makeup artist
Key hair stylist
2d hair stylist
Makeup artist, New York crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Addl Los Angeles casting
Addl New York casting
Prod coord
Asst coord
Prod consultant
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Post prod accountant
Asst to Mr. Oken and Mr. Smith
Asst to Mr. Rash
Asst to Mr. Rash
Transportation capt
Picture car coord
Unit pub
New Visions development
New Visions pub
Spiritual adv
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Office prod asst
Dialect coach
Craft services
Travel services
Loc mgr, New York crew
Asst loc mgr, New York crew
Loc asst, New York crew
Loc asst, New York crew
Loc asst, New York crew
Prod coord, New York crew
Prod co-coord, New York crew
Asst prod coord, New York crew
Asst prod coord, New York crew
Loc accountant, New York crew
Asst accountant, New York crew
Casting assoc, New York crew
Extra casting, New York crew
Transportation coord, New York crew
Car wrangler, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Intern, New York crew
Intern, New York crew
Craft service, New York crew
Scr supv, Bridge seq
Transportation capt, Bridge seq
Amtrak inspector, Bridge seq
Art consultant
Art consultant
Ginny's backyard set by
Financing
Financing
STAND INS
Stunt coord, New York crew
Stunt rigger, Bridge seq
Stunt rigger, Bridge seq
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Jackie Wilson Said (I’m In Heaven When You Smile),” performed and written by Van Morrison, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products and Caledonia Productions, Inc./Polydor Ltd.
“What Is This,” performed by Everlast, written by Bilal Bashir and Eric Schrody, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc. by arrangement with Warner Special Products/Rhyme Syndicate Records
“Let’s Get It On,” performed by Marvin Gaye, written by Marvin Gaye and Ed Townsend courtesy of Motown Record Company, L. P.
+
SONGS
“Jackie Wilson Said (I’m In Heaven When You Smile),” performed and written by Van Morrison, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products and Caledonia Productions, Inc./Polydor Ltd.
“What Is This,” performed by Everlast, written by Bilal Bashir and Eric Schrody, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc. by arrangement with Warner Special Products/Rhyme Syndicate Records
“Let’s Get It On,” performed by Marvin Gaye, written by Marvin Gaye and Ed Townsend courtesy of Motown Record Company, L. P.
the following songs appear courtesy of Epic Records by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing: “Fooled Around And Fell In Love,” performed by Henry Lee Summer, who appears courtesy of Epic Records and guitar solo by Joe Walsh, produced and engineered by Ron Nevison, written by Elvin Bishop, courtesy of Epic Associated Records
“Thank You (Falletin Me Be Mice Elf),” performed by Sly & the Family Stone, written by Sylvester Stewart
“I Want You To Want Me,” performed by Cheap Trick, written by Rick Nielson
“Hold Your Head Up,” performed by Argent, written by Rod Argent and Chris White
“Play That Funky Music,” performed by Wild Cherry, written by Robert Parissi
“Stir It Up,” performed by Johnny Nash, written by Bob Marley
the following songs appear courtesy of Columbia Records by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing: “Best Of My Love,” performed by The Emotions, written by Maurice White and Al McKay
“Shining Star,” performed by Earth, Wind & Fire, written by Maurice White, Philip Bailey, and Larry Dunn
“Got To Be Real,” performed by Cheryl Lynn, written by Cheryl Lynn, David Paich, and David Foster
“All The Young Dudes,” performed by Mott The Hoople, written by David Bowie
“Baby Hold On,” performed by Eddie Money, written by Eddie Money and James Lyon
“You’re Only Lonely,” performed and written by J. D. Souther
the following songs appear courtesy of RCA Records: “I’ve Got The World On A String,” performed by Louis Armstrong, written by Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler
“Tired Of That,” performed by Koko Taylor, written by Koko Taylor and Emery Williams, Jr., courtesy of Alligator Records
“Sing Sing Sing (With A Swing),” performed by Benny Goodman and His Orchestra, written by Louis Prima
“Feel Free,” performed by Bibi Cross, written by Dino Nicolosi and Bibi Cross-Nicolosi
“Didn’t I (Blow Your Mind This Time),” performed by The Delfonics, written by Thomas Bell and William Hart, courtesy of Arista Records, Inc.
“Party-2-Go,” performed by Ram Jam, written by Paul Chiten and Jerry Knight
“Stronger Than The Heart,” performed by The Insiders, written by John Siegel and Gary Yerkins
“Calling Out Your Name,” performed by Atoozi, written by Jeffrey Burrill and Steve Lunt, courtesy of EMI
“Arms Of The City,” performed by Monty Byrom, written by Mason Cooper, Brian Rawlings, and Monty Byrom
“Tell Me Something,” performed and written by James Harrah
“You’re A Heartache,” performed by Walker Ingleheart, written by Walker Ingleheart and Bobby Hart.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 February 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 1 February 1991
Production Date:
10 July--late August 1989
Copyright Claimant:
New Visions Pictures
Copyright Date:
30 April 1992
Copyright Number:
PA564327
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Camera and lenses by Panavision ®
Duration(in mins):
116
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30665
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the Queens borough of New York City, a boy named Al impresses his friends by climbing a rope to the roadbed of the Hell Gate Bridge. Years later, Al is a successful fishmonger, still living in Queens. On his eighth wedding anniversay, he buys an expensive ring from hustler Monte McFadden for his wife, Carla. At Jack’s Tavern, Al joins his cousin, Ray, an aspiring artist, who is having doubts about his impending marriage. As they leave, Al encounters business rival Joey Clams, whom he treats with derision. Meanwhile, Carla grows impatient with her inconsiderate husband and cancels plans for their anniversary dinner. Al returns home three hours late, and when he attempts to placate his wife, she punches him in the face. Carla leaves Al, taking their daughters, Angelica and Roberta, to the home of her mother, Maria. The next morning, Al arrives at his fish market with a black eye, but avoids revealing the cause. Joey Clams’s nephew enters the office, and is frightened away by Al’s assistant, Eliot, who is armed with a rifle. That evening, Al attempts to reconcile with Carla, but she refuses, complaining that he is immature. Al inadvertently proves her point by dumping garbage on the front lawn. Later, Al joins Ray, Eliot, and Vinny, a stage actor, as they drive to the airport to pick up Dennis, a trumpeter living in Los Angeles, California. They go swimming in a public pool, and discuss Ray’s reluctance to marry, Dennis’s glamorous life as a studio musician, and Al’s childhood climb up the Hell Gate Bridge. Carla drives past, ... +


In the Queens borough of New York City, a boy named Al impresses his friends by climbing a rope to the roadbed of the Hell Gate Bridge. Years later, Al is a successful fishmonger, still living in Queens. On his eighth wedding anniversay, he buys an expensive ring from hustler Monte McFadden for his wife, Carla. At Jack’s Tavern, Al joins his cousin, Ray, an aspiring artist, who is having doubts about his impending marriage. As they leave, Al encounters business rival Joey Clams, whom he treats with derision. Meanwhile, Carla grows impatient with her inconsiderate husband and cancels plans for their anniversary dinner. Al returns home three hours late, and when he attempts to placate his wife, she punches him in the face. Carla leaves Al, taking their daughters, Angelica and Roberta, to the home of her mother, Maria. The next morning, Al arrives at his fish market with a black eye, but avoids revealing the cause. Joey Clams’s nephew enters the office, and is frightened away by Al’s assistant, Eliot, who is armed with a rifle. That evening, Al attempts to reconcile with Carla, but she refuses, complaining that he is immature. Al inadvertently proves her point by dumping garbage on the front lawn. Later, Al joins Ray, Eliot, and Vinny, a stage actor, as they drive to the airport to pick up Dennis, a trumpeter living in Los Angeles, California. They go swimming in a public pool, and discuss Ray’s reluctance to marry, Dennis’s glamorous life as a studio musician, and Al’s childhood climb up the Hell Gate Bridge. Carla drives past, notices Al’s car in the parking lot, and steals the men’s clothes. However, they are unfazed by the theft, and peruse Dennis’s luggage for dry clothing. The group goes to a dance club, where Dennis and Vinny meet Inez, a “healer,” and Kate, a documentarian, while Eliot, a gay man who shuns gay society, finds a prospective partner in Jeremy. All invite their new acquaintances to Ray’s bachelor party, to be held the following night. Carla and Patricia spend the evening together, during which Carla cries over the sacrifices she has made for Al. Meanwhile, Al shows Ray the ring he bought for Carla, lamenting her departure before he could present it to her. In the morning, Al meets Patricia outside her beauty parlor, asking how he can win Carla back. She suggests Al perform an act of abject humility, which he dismisses as sarcasm. Later, Al organizes a basketball game with his friends, and invites his piano-playing neighbor, Marty, to join them. Dennis admits his longtime attraction to Patricia, and although Ray is jealous, he offers no interference. At the beauty parlor, while Patricia dyes Carla’s hair red, she affirms her belief in Ray as an artist, although he is a disappointment as a fiancé. Al meets a woman named Grace in a gourmet grocery store, and invites her to the party. She declines at first, but changes her mind after observing his ability to charm an ill-tempered store clerk. After Al delivers the groceries to Vinny’s apartment, he chases away Joey Clams’s nephew, who is loitering outside. Dennis intercepts Patricia as she leaves the beauty parlor, and declares his desire for her. Patricia declines, intent on remaining faithful to Ray until he officially breaks their engagement. That evening, Jeremy, Inez, Kate, and other guests crowd Vinny’s apartment. Eliot tells Jeremy that he has known lifelong friends Raymond, Dennis, Al, and Vinny since they roomed together in the 1970s. Although Eliot considers himself the “outsider” of the group, he describes them as the best friends he could find. Ray tells Al about his decision to cancel the wedding, because he believes having a “conventional life” would end his dream of being an artist. Grace arrives and invites Al to dance, during which he reveals his frustrated desire to be a lounge singer. Joey Clams’s nephew interrupts and offers his services as a wedding videographer. Embarrassed by his harsh treatment of the boy, Al gives him the job. At Jack’s Tavern, tarot reader Madame Rosa blames Carla’s poor communication for the state of her marriage, prompting Carla’s to have an open discussion with Al. Meanwhile, at the party, Eliot becomes irritated with Jeremy’s snobbish atttitude and tells him to leave. Marty joins Eliot as he sits on the doorstep, and a romance develops. A woman named Asha initiates a discussion with Ray about his art, which they continue in his bedroom. While Dennis loses Kate to a pretentious actor named Cecil, Vinnie bonds with Inez over their mutual penchant for howling at the moon. When Dennis makes a tearful confession about his dismal career prospects in Los Angeles, Vinnie advises him to “stop running away.” Carla and Patricia arrive at the party to learn that Al was last seen leaving with Grace. Patricia enters Ray’s bedroom and finds him napping while Asha sketches. Although Ray assures her that he was faithful, Patricia plans to move out in the morning. She accuses Ray of breaking their engagement because she represents Queens, a place he believes he needs to escape in order to find success. In a cemetery, Grace tells Al about her need to save every troubled person she meets. She removes the pistol from Al’s pocket, holds it to his head, and advises him to release his bad energy in an open space. After they part, Al walks to the Hell Gate Bridge and follows Grace’s advice. As morning approaches, Al telephones Ray, saying he plans to climb the bridge again. Al perches himself on a girder and throws his gun into the river, while inadvertently dropping Carla’s ring. Ray arrives, but finds no sign of Al, except for the ring, half-buried in the mud. Al drives to Maria’s house and reunites with Carla. Ray appears moments later and returns the ring. Patricia emerges from the house and Ray falls to his knees, begging her forgiveness. Carla throws the ring to Patricia, saying it will finance their honeymoon. That evening, Monte McFadden proudly joins the other guests as the wedding proceeds under the Hell Gate Bridge. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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