Ricochet (1991)

R | 102 mins | Drama | 4 October 1991

Full page view
HISTORY

The 3 Nov 1990 Screen International announced that filming would begin in Jan 1991, with singer Whitney Houston appearing in her first dramatic screen role. Houston is not credited onscreen. The 15 Apr 1991 Var reported the start of principal photography on 21 Jan 1991. However, a 6 May 1991 Var item stated that filming began one week later, on 28 Jan 1991.
       Ricochet opened 4 Oct 1991 to mixed reviews. While the 7 Oct 1991 LAT described the film as “genuinely scary, suspenseful and disturbing in the best sense,” that day's Var lamented its “tendency toward implausible excess.” Regardless, it was among the highest-grossing films in the U.S. during its opening month, earning $15,929,916, according to the 28 Oct 1991 Var.
       End credits include the following statements: “Special thanks: IPP Entertainment Marketing; The Ladew Company; Miller Beer; Pepsi Cola; Better Homes and Gardens; Buick Motor Cars; Mike Farris; Larry Shipp L.A.F.D; Quaker Oats Company; Soft Sheen; Benny Medina; Tracy Jordan; Mary Reynolds; Michael Austin; Upscale Magazine”; “Clip from White Heat provided by Turner Entertainment Co.”; “Clip from Lover, Come Back to Me provided by Tales of the Crypt Holdings”; "People Weekly Magazine logo and trademark used with permission of The Time Inc. Magazine Company.”
       Songwriter Neal Conway's name was misspelled onscreen as "Neil Conway."
       The copy viewed for this record contained some end credits that were illegible, including the names of three production drivers, and therefore do not entirely reflect what is ... More Less

The 3 Nov 1990 Screen International announced that filming would begin in Jan 1991, with singer Whitney Houston appearing in her first dramatic screen role. Houston is not credited onscreen. The 15 Apr 1991 Var reported the start of principal photography on 21 Jan 1991. However, a 6 May 1991 Var item stated that filming began one week later, on 28 Jan 1991.
       Ricochet opened 4 Oct 1991 to mixed reviews. While the 7 Oct 1991 LAT described the film as “genuinely scary, suspenseful and disturbing in the best sense,” that day's Var lamented its “tendency toward implausible excess.” Regardless, it was among the highest-grossing films in the U.S. during its opening month, earning $15,929,916, according to the 28 Oct 1991 Var.
       End credits include the following statements: “Special thanks: IPP Entertainment Marketing; The Ladew Company; Miller Beer; Pepsi Cola; Better Homes and Gardens; Buick Motor Cars; Mike Farris; Larry Shipp L.A.F.D; Quaker Oats Company; Soft Sheen; Benny Medina; Tracy Jordan; Mary Reynolds; Michael Austin; Upscale Magazine”; “Clip from White Heat provided by Turner Entertainment Co.”; “Clip from Lover, Come Back to Me provided by Tales of the Crypt Holdings”; "People Weekly Magazine logo and trademark used with permission of The Time Inc. Magazine Company.”
       Songwriter Neal Conway's name was misspelled onscreen as "Neil Conway."
       The copy viewed for this record contained some end credits that were illegible, including the names of three production drivers, and therefore do not entirely reflect what is onscreen.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
7 Oct 1991
p. 5, 15.
Los Angeles Sentinal
3 Oct 1991
Section B, p. 4, 7.
Los Angeles Times
7 Oct 1991
p. 7.
New York Times
5 Oct 1991
p. 12.
Screen International
3 Nov 1990
p. 20.
Screen International
18-24 Oct 1991
p. 1.
Variety
12 Nov 1990
p. 20.
Variety
15 Apr 1991
p. 20.
Variety
6 May 1991
p. 60.
Variety
7 Oct 1991
p. 16.
Variety
21 Oct 1991
p. 8.
Variety
28 Oct 1991
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Geffen Pictures Release
HBO in association with Cinema Plus L.P. presents
A Silver Pictures Production
A Russell Mulcahy Film
HBO
in asscociation with Cinema Plus, L.P.
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Co-prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
1st asst "B" cam
2d asst cam
2d asst "B" cam
2d asst "B" cam
Still photog
Video assist op
Cam op
Steadicam "B" cam op
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Rigging gaffer
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
2d dolly grip
Grip
Grip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Post prod supv
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Set dec
Set dec
Prop master
Asst props
Asst props
Const coord
General foreman
Labor foreman
Paint foreman
Painter
Standby painter
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Set dresser
Leadman
Leadman
Swing gang
Swing gang
Decorator
COSTUMES
Asst to cost des
Cost supv
Women's set cost
Men's set cost
Costumer
Spec cost des
Spec cost des, The Original Bad Girl
MUSIC
Orch conducted by
Addl orchestrations by
Mus clearance
Supv mus ed
Scoring mixer
Aurcle/Synclavier programmer
Machine op
Machine op
SOUND
Sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Post prod sd by
ADR ed
ADR ed
Supv dial ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Supv Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
1st sd asst
Sd asst
Sd asst
Sd asst
Sd asst
Apprentice
ADR mixer
ADR rec
In-rec mixer
In-rec mixer
This film was recorded in a
VISUAL EFFECTS
Technical consultant, Special Effects
Spec eff coord, Special Effects
Spec eff, Special Effects
Spec eff, Special Effects
Spec eff, Special Effects
Spec eff, Special Effects
Video & graphic displays
Video/Graphic displays, Video Image
Video/Graphic displays, Video Image
Video/Graphic displays, Video Image
Video/Graphic displays, Video Image
Spec visual eff
Animation and Opticals
Video Image coord
Video Image crew
Video Image crew
Video Image crew
Video Image crew
Video Image crew
Visual eff supv
Opt supv
Plate photog supv
Main and end titles
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Addl makeup artist
Addl makeup artist
Hairstylist
Addl hair stylist
Addl hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Pilot
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Loc liaison
Prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Asst to Joel Silver
Asst to Joel Silver
Asst to Joel Silver
Prod secy
Asst to Michael Levy
Asst to Barry Josephson
Asst to Russell Mulcahy
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Casting asst
Casting asst
Extras casting
Extras casting
First aid
First aid
First aid
Caterer
Craft service
Transportation coord
Transportation captain
Police tech advisor
Police tech advisor
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
2d asst accountant
Pub
Prod co. representative
Post prod supv
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Voice casting
Post-prod accounting
Post-prod accounting
Completion guaranty provided by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Automatic,” words and music by Brock Walsh and Mark Goldenberg, published by MCA Music Publishing, a division of MCA Inc., Music Corporation of America, Inc. and Fleedleedle Music, rights administered by MCA Music Publishing, a division of MCA Inc., performed by The Pointer Sisters, courtesy of RCA Record Label, a Division of BMG Music
“Tuff Enuff,” words and music by Kim Wilson, published by Fab Bird Music (Admin. by CMI), performed by The Fabulous Thunderbirds, courtesy of Epic/Associated Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
“Makin' Happy,” words and music by Crystal Waters, Neil Conway and Mark Harris, published by Basement Boys Music, Inc. and BMG Music (Admin. by Polygram International Publishing), performed by Crystal Waters, courtesy of Polygram Special Products, a division of Polygram Group Dist. Inc.
+
SONGS
“Automatic,” words and music by Brock Walsh and Mark Goldenberg, published by MCA Music Publishing, a division of MCA Inc., Music Corporation of America, Inc. and Fleedleedle Music, rights administered by MCA Music Publishing, a division of MCA Inc., performed by The Pointer Sisters, courtesy of RCA Record Label, a Division of BMG Music
“Tuff Enuff,” words and music by Kim Wilson, published by Fab Bird Music (Admin. by CMI), performed by The Fabulous Thunderbirds, courtesy of Epic/Associated Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
“Makin' Happy,” words and music by Crystal Waters, Neil Conway and Mark Harris, published by Basement Boys Music, Inc. and BMG Music (Admin. by Polygram International Publishing), performed by Crystal Waters, courtesy of Polygram Special Products, a division of Polygram Group Dist. Inc.
“You Better Mind,” performed by The Saint John's Methodist Church Gospel Choir
“Oh Freedom,” performed by The Saint John's Methodist Church Gospel Choir
“I Love Your Smile,” words and music by Narada Michael Walden, Shanice Wilson, Sylvester Jackson, Jarvis La Rue Baker, published by Gratitude Sky Music (ASCAP), Shanice 4 U Music (ASCAP), performed by Shanice Wilson, courtesy of Motown Record Company. L.P.
“Chic Mystique,” words and music by Nile Rodgers, Bernard Edwards and Princessa, published by Tommy Jymi Music, Inc., admin. by Warner-Tamerlane Music (BMI), Bernard Edward Productions (Admin. by WB Music Corp.) (ASCAP), performed by Chic, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc. by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Next 2 Me,” words and music by Donald D., published by Syndicate Snyper Music (ASCAP), O.G. Rhyme Music (BMI), performed and produced by Donald D., courtesy of Sire Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Killer,” words and music by Adam Tinley and Seal, published by MCA Music Ltd., Beethoven Street Music, Ltd./Perfect Songs/Virgin Music, performed by Seal, courtesy of Sire Records/ZTT Records Ltd./Warner Music U.K. Ltd., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Ricochet,” written and performed by Ice T, used courtesy of Warner Special Products/Sire Records, Copyright © 1991 Rhyme Syndicate Music (ASCAP).
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 October 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 4 October 1991
Production Date:
began late January 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Cinema Plus, L.P.
Copyright Date:
28 October 1991
Copyright Number:
PA545089
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral Recording Dolby Stereo® SR in selected theatres
Sound
This film recorded in a THX Sound System Theater
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
102
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31399
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, California, police officer and law student Nick “P. K.” Styles plays basketball with his fellow officer, Larry Doyle, and boyhood friends, Odessa and R. C. Afterward, Nick introduces himself to an attractive spectator named Alice, and writes his telephone number on a parking ticket. That evening, Nick and Larry are stationed at a carnival, while in a nearby building, professional killer Earl Talbot Blake murders a group of drug dealers. Larry arrests Blake’s assistant, Kim, while the murderer jumps through a window, landing directly in front of Nick. Blake takes a hostage from the crowd and orders Nick to surrender his pistol. Nick complies, removing his clothing to prove he is unarmed, then pulls a gun from his underwear and shoots Blake in the knee. An amateur photographer captures the incident on videotape, and Nick becomes an overnight celebrity. The next day, the officers are commended by District Attorney Priscilla “The Hun” Brimleigh, and promoted to detectives. Meanwhile, Blake swears revenge while watching a television broadcast of Nick addressing reporters. As the years pass, Nick becomes an Assistant District Attorney, and his marriage to Alice produces two daughters, Lisa and Monica. In prison, Blake is a belligerent inmate, who obsessively follows Nick’s career. After killing his brutish cellmate, Chewalski, in a mock gladiator fight, Blake gains the confidence of Aryan Nation member Jesse Schultzman by offering him a chance to escape. Shortly before Kim is paroled he switches Jesse’s medical records with those of Blake. Nick’s fame grows after he successfully prosecutes a serial killer known as the “Night Strangler,” prompting City Councilman ... +


In Los Angeles, California, police officer and law student Nick “P. K.” Styles plays basketball with his fellow officer, Larry Doyle, and boyhood friends, Odessa and R. C. Afterward, Nick introduces himself to an attractive spectator named Alice, and writes his telephone number on a parking ticket. That evening, Nick and Larry are stationed at a carnival, while in a nearby building, professional killer Earl Talbot Blake murders a group of drug dealers. Larry arrests Blake’s assistant, Kim, while the murderer jumps through a window, landing directly in front of Nick. Blake takes a hostage from the crowd and orders Nick to surrender his pistol. Nick complies, removing his clothing to prove he is unarmed, then pulls a gun from his underwear and shoots Blake in the knee. An amateur photographer captures the incident on videotape, and Nick becomes an overnight celebrity. The next day, the officers are commended by District Attorney Priscilla “The Hun” Brimleigh, and promoted to detectives. Meanwhile, Blake swears revenge while watching a television broadcast of Nick addressing reporters. As the years pass, Nick becomes an Assistant District Attorney, and his marriage to Alice produces two daughters, Lisa and Monica. In prison, Blake is a belligerent inmate, who obsessively follows Nick’s career. After killing his brutish cellmate, Chewalski, in a mock gladiator fight, Blake gains the confidence of Aryan Nation member Jesse Schultzman by offering him a chance to escape. Shortly before Kim is paroled he switches Jesse’s medical records with those of Blake. Nick’s fame grows after he successfully prosecutes a serial killer known as the “Night Strangler,” prompting City Councilman Farris to suggest he run for public office. Nick declines, preferring to use his celebrity to restore the Watts Towers historical monument and build a community center nearby. After publicly announcing his plans, Nick enters the drug den where Odessa and R. C. operate a laboratory, and threatens them with a hand grenade, demanding they keep their criminal activities away from his community center. After he leaves, Nick reveals the grenade to be a novelty cigarette lighter. Days later, Blake is brought before the parole board and shoots the chairman with a makeshift pistol. His Aryan Nation comrades attack other board members with power tools, and don the clothes of their victims. Blake and Jesse survive the ensuing gunfight and escape in a “Bookmobile” truck for a rendezvous with Kim that evening. Upon reaching their destination, Blake kills Jesse and fires a bullet into his knee, then incinerates the body in a fiery truck crash. The next day, television reporter Gail Wallens informs Nick of Blake’s escape and subsequent death, unaware that the killer is nearby, disguised as a homeless man. Blake follows the attorney to a restaurant, and listens as businessmen and city officials discuss plans for a telethon to fund the Watts Towers project. On the night of the telethon, Lisa and Monica are in the care of a babysitter when the house goes dark. Blake enters the house disguised as an electric company worker, and renders the children and their sitter unconscious with drugs, but does no further harm. Afterward, Blake and Kim ambush Councilman Farris outside his home, and he is later found hanged from the ceiling. Police discover a collection of child pornography and a suicide note confessing to child molestation. While the news media denigrate Farris, Nick defends his friend’s reputation, certain that he was murdered. That evening, Nick is abducted by Blake and handcuffed to a bed in an empty hotel swimming pool. Following injections of cocaine and heroine, Nick is seduced by a prostitute named Wanda, as Kim videotapes the encounter. Before releasing his captive, Blake assures Nick that death will be preferable to the life he now faces. In the morning, Nick is found unconscious in a homeless encampment outside City Hall. Because Blake is presumed dead, Nick’s account of his ordeal is dismissed as either a lie or insanity. A medical examination reveals that Nick has contracted gonorrhea, and his attempts to explain only intensify Alice’s suspicions. The next day, Nick awakens to find a videotape of Blake threatening his sleeping daughters with a hatchet. Fearing that the killer followed Alice and the girls to a nearby park, Nick goes to their rescue wearing little more than a bathrobe. He mistakes a party clown for Blake and holds him at gunpoint, while a visiting congresswoman videotapes the event. Nick is suspended from his job after Blake releases video of the attorney and Wanda to a local television station. When Larry Doyle investigates Nick’s story, he learns that Blake and Kim are expected at an Aryan Nation bookstore, where a pair of passports and airline tickets are being held for them. He has also obtained Blake’s collection of newspaper clippings, proving the killer’s obsession with Nick. That evening, Nick and Larry attempt to arrest Kim as he enters the bookstore. During the ensuing chase, Blake shoots Larry from a fire escape and throws the gun to Nick, intending to implicate the attorney in his friend’s murder. Nick plots his revenge with Odessa, and places Alice and the children in the care of R. C. Perched atop the drug den, Nick emulates the film, White Heat, Nick by igniting a fire in the laboratory and yelling “top of the world” before jumping into the flames. Blake watches the event on television, furious that his nemesis evaded arrest, and unaware that Nick escaped through a fireproof chute. A telephone call from Odessa directs Blake to the Watts Towers, where Kim is suspended from the scaffolding. Kim warns that Nick is alive, and berates his boss for underestimating the attorney. Blake shoots Kim, then fires blindly into the scaffolding in response to Nick’s taunts. When his gun is empty, Blake climbs the highest tower and battles Nick. The attorney breaks away, suspending himself from a lifeline, while Odessa sends an electric current through the structure, resulting in Blake’s impalement on an adjacent tower. Nick and Alice reunite, ignoring the crowd of police and reporters. Gail Wallen broadcasts live from the scene, declaring Nick innocent of the charges against him. However, when she asks Nick to comment, he turns off her camera. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.