Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze (1991)

PG | 88 mins | Adventure, Comedy, Children's works | 22 March 1991

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HISTORY

Opening credits begin with the following dedication, “In memory of Jim Henson.” The puppeteer’s Creature Shop had produced animatronic characters for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1990, see entry), a film that was still in theaters when a 19 Apr 1990 DV news item stated that producer Thomas K. Gray had “talked to Jim Henson” about designing creatures for a sequel. Less than a month later, on 16 May 1990, Henson died. However, a 17 Jul 1990 DV article confirmed that Henson’s Creature Shop would again be involved in creating the four principal turtle characters, as well as new characters.
       The name of ninja turtle “Michaelangelo” is spelled as such in onscreen credits, even though the mutants’ origin story attributes each of their names to a great Renaissance artist, and the name of the sixteenth-century Italian sculptor-painter is spelled “Michelangelo.”
       Golden Harvest, the company that produced the first Ninja Turtles film, as well as the sequel, was well known for producing Hong Kong martial-arts films that appealed to Western audiences.
       With the tremendous box office success of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, producers were quick to plan a second film. Although a 2 Jun 1990 Screen International news item stated that Steve Barron, who directed the first picture, would helm the sequel, DV reported on 17 Jul 1990 that Michael Pressman was slated to direct Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze. The role of reporter "April O’Neil" was also recast, with Paige Turco replacing Judith Hoag, as noted by several sources. On 6 Jun 1990, HR suggested that actor ... More Less

Opening credits begin with the following dedication, “In memory of Jim Henson.” The puppeteer’s Creature Shop had produced animatronic characters for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1990, see entry), a film that was still in theaters when a 19 Apr 1990 DV news item stated that producer Thomas K. Gray had “talked to Jim Henson” about designing creatures for a sequel. Less than a month later, on 16 May 1990, Henson died. However, a 17 Jul 1990 DV article confirmed that Henson’s Creature Shop would again be involved in creating the four principal turtle characters, as well as new characters.
       The name of ninja turtle “Michaelangelo” is spelled as such in onscreen credits, even though the mutants’ origin story attributes each of their names to a great Renaissance artist, and the name of the sixteenth-century Italian sculptor-painter is spelled “Michelangelo.”
       Golden Harvest, the company that produced the first Ninja Turtles film, as well as the sequel, was well known for producing Hong Kong martial-arts films that appealed to Western audiences.
       With the tremendous box office success of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, producers were quick to plan a second film. Although a 2 Jun 1990 Screen International news item stated that Steve Barron, who directed the first picture, would helm the sequel, DV reported on 17 Jul 1990 that Michael Pressman was slated to direct Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze. The role of reporter "April O’Neil" was also recast, with Paige Turco replacing Judith Hoag, as noted by several sources. On 6 Jun 1990, HR suggested that actor John Candy might perform a cameo role in the sequel, but he does not make an onscreen appearance in the finished film.
       Various contemporary sources reported throughout the summer of 1990 that production on the $20 million picture would begin in the fall, and an 18 Oct 1990 HR production chart confirmed that production on Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II began 1 Oct. According to studio production notes in the AMPAS library files, the majority of filming occurred on five sound stages and the backlot of Carolco Studios in Wilmington, NC, with four days spent shooting exterior scenes in New York City. A 14 Nov 1990 DV news item reported that more than $1 million was spent on sets, one of which replicated an historic New York subway station. Production lasted forty-eight days, with a 5 Dec 1990 HR news item announcing that filming was complete.
       A Nov 1990 DV news brief stated that the animatronic puppets would be “more intricate” than in the first film, with “more facial expressions.” The 22 Mar 1991 HR review noted that the four turtles, who, in the previous film, looked nearly identical, achieved more individual differentiation in the sequel, with “characteristic smiles, frowns, and goggle-eyed stares.”
       On 8 Mar 1991, DV announced that a benefit premiere of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze would take place 17 Mar 1991 at the Cineplex Odeon Universal Cinemas. The film received its theatrical release on 22 Mar 1991 on over 3,000 screens, a record number at the time, and on 25 Mar 1991, the HR stated that the film earned an estimated $20 million over its three-day opening weekend. Reviews were mixed, with some critics remarking on excessive violence in the film. Contemporary sources reported that the picture was banned or age-restricted in some European and Asian countries, including Germany, Denmark, and Malaysia.
       End credits begin with the following acknowledgment: “Special thanks to Renay and Mark Freedman.” Additional end credit acknowledgments include: “Paulina Porizkova poster courtesy of Funky Enterprises; Daily News masthead and its components used with the permission of New York News Inc.; Filmed at the Carolco Studios, Wilmington, North Carolina, and on location in North Carolina and New York City.” End credits conclude with: “Special thanks to: Cheryl and Jim Prindle, Mirage Studios; Brian Henson; Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting, New York; New York City Police Department – Movie & T.V. Unit; the People and the City of Wilmington, North Carolina; Kent Swaim and Carolco Studios, Wilmington, North Carolina; John G. Arrasmith of Spotted Horse Reproductions; James Watt of Hummingbird Toy Company, Ltd.; Macho Products, Inc.; Coca Cola – Wilmington, North Carolina; Toys ‘R’ Us; Omega Sports; Dunkin’ Donuts; Bandit Lights.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
19 Apr 1990.
---
Daily Variety
17 Jul 1990
p.1, 23.
Daily Variety
17 Jul 1990.
---
Daily Variety
14 Nov 1990.
---
Daily Variety
8 Mar 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jun 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Oct 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Dec 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Mar 1991
p. 1, 9, 14, 50.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Mar 1991
p. 3, 43.
Los Angeles Times
22 Mar 1991
p. 1.
New York Times
22 Mar 1991.
---
Screen International
2 Jun 1990.
---
Variety
25 Mar 1991
p. 88.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Raymond Serra
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Golden Harvest presents
in association with Gary Propper
a Michael Pressman film
A Golden Harvest Presentation
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Dir, 2d unit
Addl 2d unit dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
2d 2d asst dir, New York unit
PRODUCERS
Prod
Prod
Exec prod
Co-prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
Key grip
Best boy
Dolly grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Gaffer
Best boy
Rigging gaffer
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Video tech
Still photog
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
1st asst photog, 2d unit
1st asst photog, 2d unit
2d asst photog, 2d unit
Cam apprentice, 2d unit
Video tech, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Best boy, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
Best boy, 2d unit
Elec, 2d unit
Elec, 2d unit
Elec, 2d unit
Best boy, New York unit
Elec, New York unit
Elec, New York unit
Elec, New York unit
Elec, New York unit
Grip, New York unit
Grip, New York unit
Grip, New York unit
Translights by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Supv art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
Story board artist
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
SET DECORATORS
Draftsperson
Set dec
Leadman
On set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Prop asst
Const coord
Const foreman
Const purchaser
Lead carpenter
Lead carpenter
Lead carpenter
Lead carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Lead scenic artist
Scenic artist foreman
Asst scenic artist foreman
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Standby painter
Standby painter
Plaster foreman
Lead plasterer
Lead plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Plasterer
Laborer
Prop master, 2d unit
Prop asst, 2d unit
Prop buyer, 2d unit
Set dec, New York unit
Set prod asst, New York unit
Set prod asst, New York unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Cutter/Fitter
Key set costumer
Key set costumer
Ward asst
Ward asst
Ward asst
Ward asst
Ward prod asst, New York unit
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus supv
Mus coord
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Orchestrator
Scoring mixer
Orchestral scoring mixer
Programming
Contractor
Asst eng
SOUND
Supv sd ed
ADR supv
ADR ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
1st asst sd ed
2d asst sd ed
ADR asst
Apprentice sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Addl sd eff rec
Sd eff coord
A.D.R. mixer
A.D.R. rec
A.D.R. rec
Foley mixer
Foley rec
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Machine op
Machine op
Sd mixer
Boom man
Cable man/Communications
Sd mixer, 2d unit
Post prod facilities
VISUAL EFFECTS
Animatronic characters by
Creative supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Prod supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Business mgr, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Control system des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Visual supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Rahzar des/Super Shredder des, Jim Henson's Creatu
Tokka des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Super Shredder des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Splinter des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanical des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanical des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanical des, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Foam lab supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Machine shop supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mould shop supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Hair tech, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Prod secy, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Prod secy, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Suit fabrication supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Suit fabrication supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Suit fabrication supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Suit fabrication supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Suit fabrication supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Suit fabrication supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Computer control supv, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Computer control tech, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanic, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanic, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanic, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanic, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanic, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mechanic, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mould maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mould maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mould maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mould maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mould maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mould maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Mould shop labourer, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Painter, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Painter, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Painter, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Painter, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Suit maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Suit maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Suit maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Suit maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Suit maker, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Foam tech, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Foam tech, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Foam tech, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Foam tech, Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Cost dresser/Maintenance, Jim Henson's Creature Sh
Cost dresser/Maintenance, Jim Henson's Creature Sh
Cost dresser/Maintenance, Jim Henson's Creature Sh
Cost dresser/Maintenance, Jim Henson's Creature Sh
Cost dresser/Maintenance, Jim Henson's Creature Sh
Cost dresser/Maintenance, Jim Henson's Creature Sh
Cost dresser/Maintenance, Jim Henson's Creature Sh
Cost dresser/Maintenance, Jim Henson's Creature Sh
Cost dresser/Maintenance, Jim Henson's Creature Sh
Cost dresser/Maintenance, Jim Henson's Creature Sh
Cost dresser/Maintenance, Jim Henson's Creature Sh
Cost dresser/Maintenance, Jim Henson's Creature Sh
Cost dresser/Maintenance, Jim Henson's Creature Sh
Special eff services
Spec eff coord
Effectsman
Effectsman
Effectsman
Effectsman
Titles and opticals by
Computer anim and displays by
DANCE
Dance choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Asst makeup
Hairstylist
Addl hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod exec
Asst to producers
Prod comptroller
Asst prod comptroller
Supv prod accountant
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Asst to Mr. Pressman
Casting assoc
Loc casting
Unit pub
Physio-therapist
Medic
Craft service
Craft service
Transportation coord
Driver
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Scr supv, 2d unit
Prod supv, New York unit
Prod coord, New York uni
Asst prod coord, New York unit
Asst loc mgr, New York unit
DGA trainee, New York unit
Extra casting, New York unit
Extra casting, New York unit
Craft service, New York unit
Parking coord, New York unit
Transportation capt, New York unit
Transportation co-capt, New York unit
Prod asst, New York unit
Prod asst, New York unit
Payroll services
Travel services
Travel services
Creature Shop packing & shipping
Completion guaranty provided by
Stock footage by
STAND INS
Michaelangelo, Voice
Leonardo, Voice
Raphael, Voice
Donatello, Voice
Splinter, Voice
Shredder, Voice
Tatsu, Voice
Rahzar/Tokka, Voice
Stunt coord and martial arts choreog
Asst stunt coord/Turtles stunt double
Asst martial arts choreog
Donatello, Turtle fight double
Raphael, Turtle fight double
Michaelangelo, Turtle fight double
Leonardo, Turtle fight double
Addl turtle fight double
Addl turtle fight double
Addl turtle fight double
Rahzar stunt double
Tokka stunt double
Stuntman
Stuntman
Keno's fights performed by
himself
ANIMATION
Featured animatronic puppeteers:
Chief puppeteer/Michaelangelo, Animatronic puppete
Raphael, Animatronic puppeteer
Leonardo, Animatronic puppeteer
[and]
Donatello, Animatronic puppeteer
Splinter, Animatronic puppeteer
Splinter, Animatronic puppeteer
Splinter, Animatronic puppeteer
Rahzar, Animatronic puppeteer
Tokka, Animatronic puppeteer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird, exclusively licensed by Surge Licensing, Inc.
SONGS
"Ninja Rap," written by Vanilla Ice, Earthquake and Todd W. Langen, © 1991 EMI Blackwood Music Inc./Ice Baby/QPM Music Inc./ICBD Music, performed by Vanilla Ice & Earthquake
"Creatures Of Habit," written by Steve Harvey and Renee Geyer, © 1991 EMI Blackwood Music Inc./EMI April Music Inc./Ney Gey Music, performed by Spunkadelic
"Find The Key To Your Life," written by Cathy Dennis and David Morales, © 1991 EMI Music Publishing Ltd. (administered by Colgems-EMI Music Inc.)/Def Mix Music, performed by Cathy Dennis and David Morales, Cathy Dennis appears courtesy of Polydor Records
+
SONGS
"Ninja Rap," written by Vanilla Ice, Earthquake and Todd W. Langen, © 1991 EMI Blackwood Music Inc./Ice Baby/QPM Music Inc./ICBD Music, performed by Vanilla Ice & Earthquake
"Creatures Of Habit," written by Steve Harvey and Renee Geyer, © 1991 EMI Blackwood Music Inc./EMI April Music Inc./Ney Gey Music, performed by Spunkadelic
"Find The Key To Your Life," written by Cathy Dennis and David Morales, © 1991 EMI Music Publishing Ltd. (administered by Colgems-EMI Music Inc.)/Def Mix Music, performed by Cathy Dennis and David Morales, Cathy Dennis appears courtesy of Polydor Records
"This World," written by Mickey Mahoney, Troy Duncombe and Rosano Martinez, © 1991 EMI Songs Australia Pty Ltd/Sony Music Publishing/Copyright Control, performed by Magnificent VII courtesy of Truetone/EMI Records Australia Pty Ltd
"Awesome (You Are My Hero)," written by D. Poku and Manuela Kamosi, © 1991 EMI Songs Ltd. (administered by EMI Blackwood Music Inc.)/BMC Publishing and Bogam Publishing (administered by Colgems-EMI Music Inc.), performed by Ya Kid K
"Moov," written by Winston Jones, Karen Bernod and Pierre Salandy, © 1991 EMI Blackwood Music Inc./Jonesy Music, performed by Tribal House
"Back to School," written by Solomon Forbes, Duane Daniel, Brian Daniel and Gene Parker, © 1991 EMI Blackwood Music Inc./Fifth Street Music, performed by Fifth Platoon
"(That's Your) Consciousness," written by John Du Prez, Dan Hartman and Charlie Midnight, © 1991 EMI Blackwood Music Inc./Zellcom Industries B.V./EMI April Music Inc./Constant Evolution Music/EMI Blackwood Music Inc./Janiceps Music, performed by Dan Hartman.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 March 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 17 March 1991
Los Angeles and New York openings: 22 March 1991
Production Date:
1 October--4 December 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Northshore Investments, Ltd.
Copyright Date:
28 March 1991
Copyright Number:
PA515849
Physical Properties:
Sound
This film recorded in a Lucasfilm Ltd THX® Sound System Theatre
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
88
Length(in feet):
7830
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30966
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On a typical night in busy New York City, teenager Keno delivers several pizzas to news reporter April O’Neil’s residence. When he arrives outside her apartment building, he notices suspicious activity across the street. Upon investigation, the pizza-delivery boy discovers three criminals stealing merchandise from a shopping arcade. Keno threatens the men, who laugh at his diminutive size. However, he demonstrates his prowess at martial arts and defeats the thieves, but when an entire gang of delinquents emerges from the other shops, Keno realizes he is overpowered. Just then, the four teenage mutant ninja turtles—Donatello, Raphael, Michaelangelo, and Leonardo—arrive, and a fight ensues. Using a variety of common objects as weapons, the clever oversized turtles leave the criminals tied up in a heap. Later, with pizza boxes in hand, the turtles return to April O’Neil’s apartment. They make jokes and behave like adolescents, while April cleans up after them. She asks when they plan to move to a new apartment, and Leonardo expresses concern about being discovered by their arch-enemy, Shredder, and his henchmen, “the Foot” clan, who lurk throughout the city. Raphael argues that they have no need to worry, because Splinter, the turtles’ mentor, defeated Shredder some time ago, burying him in a garbage dump. Master Splinter, a wise giant rat, interrupts the debate, reminding the teenagers that, regardless of the victory over Shredder, the human world is not a suitable living environment for mutants. Meanwhile, at the city dump, the Foot clan gathers under the leadership of malevolent karate master, Tatsu. He attempts to rally the ninja thieves, who are shocked when Shredder appears in the doorway, expressing his desire for revenge. The next day, the ... +


On a typical night in busy New York City, teenager Keno delivers several pizzas to news reporter April O’Neil’s residence. When he arrives outside her apartment building, he notices suspicious activity across the street. Upon investigation, the pizza-delivery boy discovers three criminals stealing merchandise from a shopping arcade. Keno threatens the men, who laugh at his diminutive size. However, he demonstrates his prowess at martial arts and defeats the thieves, but when an entire gang of delinquents emerges from the other shops, Keno realizes he is overpowered. Just then, the four teenage mutant ninja turtles—Donatello, Raphael, Michaelangelo, and Leonardo—arrive, and a fight ensues. Using a variety of common objects as weapons, the clever oversized turtles leave the criminals tied up in a heap. Later, with pizza boxes in hand, the turtles return to April O’Neil’s apartment. They make jokes and behave like adolescents, while April cleans up after them. She asks when they plan to move to a new apartment, and Leonardo expresses concern about being discovered by their arch-enemy, Shredder, and his henchmen, “the Foot” clan, who lurk throughout the city. Raphael argues that they have no need to worry, because Splinter, the turtles’ mentor, defeated Shredder some time ago, burying him in a garbage dump. Master Splinter, a wise giant rat, interrupts the debate, reminding the teenagers that, regardless of the victory over Shredder, the human world is not a suitable living environment for mutants. Meanwhile, at the city dump, the Foot clan gathers under the leadership of malevolent karate master, Tatsu. He attempts to rally the ninja thieves, who are shocked when Shredder appears in the doorway, expressing his desire for revenge. The next day, the turtles watch on television as April interviews Professor Jordan Perry about an environmental cleanup effort being led by Techno Global Research Industries. Although the TGRI scientist answers her questions, he does not acknowledge any strange phenomena related to the decades-old toxic waste. However, after the interview, April’s assistant Freddy snoops around the cleanup site and discovers a patch of strange two-foot-tall dandelions. Freddy, actually a member of the Foot clan, returns to the garbage dump to show one of the mutated flowers to Shredder. Meanwhile, back at April’s apartment, Splinter reveals that the canister of ooze responsible for his and the turtles’ transformation fifteen years ago came from TGRI. That night, the turtles sneak into the TGRI laboratory, searching for further clues to their origins. Donatello attempts to access the computer database, but just then, the Foot clan, led by Tatsu, surrounds the turtles. A fight ensues, and the clan escapes with the last remaining canister of toxic ooze. The turtles return to April’s apartment and, out of concern for her safety, begin packing their belongings. Keno arrives with some pizzas and discovers the turtles’ existence. The enthusiastic boy, who has martial arts training, proposes that he infiltrate the Foot clan and report back to the turtles. Raphael approves of the idea, but Splinter and the others believe the plan is too dangerous. Back at the garbage dump, Shredder reveals his scheme to expose two wild animals to the ooze, creating “weapons” to unleash against the teenage turtles. He commands Professor Perry, whom the Foot clan kidnapped, to conduct the experiment. Meanwhile, in the city sewer system, the turtles look for a new place to live. Raphael quarrels with Donatello, Leonardo, and Michaelangelo, and leaves to find the Foot clan on his own. The next day, he recruits Keno, and together, they penetrate the gang’s garbage dump headquarters. When their presence is discovered, a fight ensues, and the rebellious turtle is captured. Keno escapes to tell April and the other turtles about Raphael’s predicament. That night, Leonardo, Donatello, and Michaelangelo sneak into the dump to rescue their friend and are surprised when they come face to face with their old nemesis, Shredder. The villain unveils the results of his biological experiment: Tokka and Rahzar, two enormous mutant creatures that possess supernatural strength. The monsters, however, are not at all intelligent, and when Michaelangelo finds a manhole cover, the turtles, along with Professor Perry, escape into the sewer system. They make their way to the turtles’ new hideout, an abandoned subway station, and introduce the scientist to their master, Splinter. Meanwhile, in retaliation, Shredder sets Tokka and Rahzar loose in April’s neighborhood. The next morning, April’s assistant Freddy reveals his allegiance to the Foot clan, and gives her a threatening message to take to the turtles. She finds them at their new hideout and conveys the challenge: unless all four turtles agree to a rematch with Shredder, their nemesis will set Tokka and Rahzar free in Central Park, where the creatures could easily prey on the general public. Before the turtles embark on the confrontation, Professor Perry prepares an “anti-mutagen” for them to use against the two destructive monsters. That night, Michaelangelo, Donatello, Raphael, and Leonardo face Shredder and the Foot clan at a construction site. Shredder unleashes Tokka and Rahzar. Although the turtles attempt to administer the Professor’s anti-mutagen, the monsters attack. The fight spills over into an adjacent nightclub, where everyone thinks the turtles, Tokka, and Rahzar are simply partygoers wearing costumes. In sync to the rap music, the four teenage ninjas combine dance moves with martial arts, defeating their adversaries. However, Shredder, lurking at the perimeter of the fracas, drinks a vial of ooze and transforms into an enormous “Super Shredder.” Outside, on a pier, he challenges the turtles to a final battle, but the teenage ninjas outwit him, swimming to safety as the pier falls, destroying their giant enemy. Later, back at the turtles’ hideout, Splinter watches a news broadcast in which April reports on TGRI’s closure. He shakes his head in disbelief when she extends a mysterious “thanks” to Leonardo, Michaelangelo, Raphael, and Donatello. The rambunctious turtles arrive home, celebrating, and Splinter suggests that their stealth ninja skills could use some improvement. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.