The Presidio (1988)

R | 97 mins | Mystery, Drama | 10 June 1988

Director:

Peter Hyams

Writer:

Larry Ferguson

Cinematographer:

Peter Hyams

Production Designer:

Albert Brenner

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures
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HISTORY

       A news item from the 12 Jun 1987 DV mentioned director Tony Scott had been selected to direct the picture. However, the 9 Jun 1988 LAHExam quoted writer Larry Ferguson as saying that he and Scott “worked on [the film] for a while,” before Scott “went off to do something else.” There were no further reports of Scott’s involvement in the production. Once Peter Hyams was hired as his replacement, he and producer Jonathan A. Zimbert had only twelve weeks to complete casting and pre-production.
       A 29 Aug 1987 Long Beach Press-Telegram brief reported actor Marlon Brando was approached for the film. However, there were no further reports of Brando’s participation.
       The 9 Oct 1987 Var production chart, referring to the film by its working title, Presidio, reported that principal photography began 28 Sep 1987 in San Francisco, CA, while news briefs in the 29 Aug 1987 L.B. Press-Telegram and 2 Sep 1987 DV reported filming started at the beginning of Oct 1987. A 5 Oct 1987 HR article reported the picture filmed on location in San Francisco and at the Presidio of San Francisco throughout Oct 1987, followed by filming in Los Angeles, CA until mid-Jan 1988, then returning to San Francisco to complete principal photography. According to studio production notes in AMPAS library files, locations included: the Presidio Officer’s Club, the San Francisco National Cemetery located at the Presidio, Fort Point in San Francisco, six sound stages at Paramount Pictures studio in Los Angeles, the Presidio Museum, and the main Presidio parade ground. ... More Less

       A news item from the 12 Jun 1987 DV mentioned director Tony Scott had been selected to direct the picture. However, the 9 Jun 1988 LAHExam quoted writer Larry Ferguson as saying that he and Scott “worked on [the film] for a while,” before Scott “went off to do something else.” There were no further reports of Scott’s involvement in the production. Once Peter Hyams was hired as his replacement, he and producer Jonathan A. Zimbert had only twelve weeks to complete casting and pre-production.
       A 29 Aug 1987 Long Beach Press-Telegram brief reported actor Marlon Brando was approached for the film. However, there were no further reports of Brando’s participation.
       The 9 Oct 1987 Var production chart, referring to the film by its working title, Presidio, reported that principal photography began 28 Sep 1987 in San Francisco, CA, while news briefs in the 29 Aug 1987 L.B. Press-Telegram and 2 Sep 1987 DV reported filming started at the beginning of Oct 1987. A 5 Oct 1987 HR article reported the picture filmed on location in San Francisco and at the Presidio of San Francisco throughout Oct 1987, followed by filming in Los Angeles, CA until mid-Jan 1988, then returning to San Francisco to complete principal photography. According to studio production notes in AMPAS library files, locations included: the Presidio Officer’s Club, the San Francisco National Cemetery located at the Presidio, Fort Point in San Francisco, six sound stages at Paramount Pictures studio in Los Angeles, the Presidio Museum, and the main Presidio parade ground. A 1 Feb 1988 DV brief stated filming had “been completed on schedule.”
       Paramount held an invitation-only preview screening of the picture on 8 Jun 1988 at the AMPAS Samuel Goldwyn Theatre in Beverly Hills, CA. The 16 Jun 1988 LAT reported the picture’s world premiere included a fundraiser which raised $40,000 for the William H. Parker Los Angeles Police Foundation.
       A 31 May 1988 DV brief and a 24 May 1988 Paramount press release stated that the film opened 10 Jun 1988 on 1,100 screens. An article in the 10 Jun 1988 HR stated the film opened on 1,143 screens. A two-page advertisement in 15 Jun 1988 HR reported that during its “first 3 days” of release the film took in “$5,119,031” at the box-office.
      End credits state: “The producers gratefully acknowledge the cooperation and assistance of: The Department of Defense; the Department of the Army; the Presidio of San Francisco; City of San Francisco, Mayor’s Office; San Francisco Police Department, Lt. Dennis Schardt; San Francisco Chinese Chamber of Commerce; and also John E. Horton, Pat Grossman, Rose Pak, John Lehane.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
12 Jun 1987
p. 3.
Daily Variety
3 Aug 1987
p. 3.
Daily Variety
25 Aug 1987.
---
Daily Variety
2 Sep 1987
p. 11.
Daily Variety
5 Oct 1987
p. 3.
Daily Variety
29 Oct 1987
p. 12.
Daily Variety
2 Dec 1987
p. 2.
Daily Variety
14 Dec 1987
p. 60.
Daily Variety
1 Feb 1988
p. 2.
Daily Variety
8 Apr 1988
p. 3.
Daily Variety
19 Apr 1988
p. 18.
Daily Variety
31 May 1988
p. 3.
Daily Variety
10 Jun 1988
p. 3, 16.
Daily Variety
15 Jun 1988
pp. 10--11.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 1987
p. 1, 12.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Oct 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Apr 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jun 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jun 1988
p. 3, 51.
LAHExam
19 Aug 1987
Section A, p. 2.
LAHExam
9 Jun 1988
Section C, p. 1, 7.
Long Beach Press-Telegram
29 Aug 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
10 Jun 1988
p. 1, 25.
Los Angeles Times
16 Jun 1988
p. 7.
New York Times
10 Jun 1988
p. 15.
Variety
9 Oct 1987.
---
Variety
28 Oct 1987
p. 14.
Variety
15 Jun 1988
p. 13.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A D. Constantine Conte Production
A Peter Hyams Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst photog
1st asst photog
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
1st company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Chief lighting tech
Chief rigging elec
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Still photog
Film loader
Panaglide op
Asst chief lighting tech
Chapman crane
Lighting tech, San Francisco unit
Grip, San Francisco unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Illustrator
Art dept res asst
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutting by
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Lead person
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Labor foreperson
Prod painter
Asst prop
Propmaker foreman
Const painter
Leadman, San Francisco unit
COSTUMES
Ward supv
Ward supv
Men`s set costumer
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
Mus rec at
SOUND
Prod mixer
Cable person
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Foley supv
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Dolby Stereo consultant
Re-rec at
Rec, San Francisco unit
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff shop supv
Spec eff company supv
Spec eff
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod office coord
Prod office secy
Dept of the Army tech adv
Presidio military consultant
San Francisco Police tech adv
Hapkido consultant for thumb fight
Loc mgr
Unit coord, San Francisco
Unit pub
Hyams/Zimbert secy
Hyams/Zimbert prod asst
Asst to Mr. Conte
Asst to Mr. Conte
Asst to Mr. Ferguson
Prod auditor
Asst prod auditor
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation coord
San Francisco extras casting
San Francisco extras casting
Los Angeles extras casting
Casting asst
Los Angeles extra casting
Accounting prod asst
Craft service
Four Star Catering
Four Star Catering
Four Star Catering
Four Star Catering
Transportation capt
Loc mgr, San Francisco unit
Loc asst, San Francisco unit
Prod asst, San Francisco unit
Prod asst, San Francisco unit
Craft services, San Francisco unit
Transport coord, San Francisco unit
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Hard Rockin',” by David Bellamy, performed by The Bellamy Brothers, courtesy of Curb Records
“Moonlight Becomes You,” by Johnny Burke & James Van Heusen
“I Get Along Without You Very Well,” by Hoagy Carmichael
+
SONGS
“Hard Rockin',” by David Bellamy, performed by The Bellamy Brothers, courtesy of Curb Records
“Moonlight Becomes You,” by Johnny Burke & James Van Heusen
“I Get Along Without You Very Well,” by Hoagy Carmichael
“That Old Black Magic,” by Johnny Mercer & Harold Arlen
“Moon River,” by Johnny Mercer & Henry Mancini
“Tangerine,” by Johnny Mercer & Victor Schertzinger.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Presidio
Release Date:
10 June 1988
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 10 June 1988
Production Date:
late September or early October 1987--late January 1988
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
25 July 1988
Copyright Number:
PA376418
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28978
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At the Presidio, a military base in San Francisco, California, Military Police officer Patti Jean Lynch arrives for evening patrol. She drives to the Presidio Officers Club and sees a silver Lincoln car. Noticing the club’s door open and hearing voices inside, she draws her gun and enters. Inside a storage room, two men shoot and kill her before escaping in the Lincoln. Afterward, San Francisco Patrolmen Schmidt and Dotson see the speeding Lincoln and chase it. The killers shoot the police cruiser, causing it to crash, killing the patrolmen. Later, San Francisco Police Inspector Jay Austin is called into his lieutenant’s office, and assigned to investigate the shooting at the Presidio. Austin, the lieutenant believes, is the best candidate, since he was stationed at the Presidio as an M.P. before joining the San Francisco police department. At the Presidio, Jay runs into his friend M.P. Zeke, who tells him the victim is Patti Jean Lynch, Jay’s former partner. Jay finds Lt. Colonel Alan Caldwell, Presidio Provost Marshal, and Jay’s former commanding officer. Jay informs Caldwell the city police will take over the investigation. Caldwell warns Jay not to cross him while he is on the base. After Caldwell leaves, Jay notices a potted plant filled with water. The next morning, he arrives at Lt. Colonel Caldwell’s home. Caldwell’s adult daughter, Donna Caldwell, invites him in. Jay asks Donna to join him for dinner, and she agrees. He informs Caldwell that a Russian Tokarev pistol was used in the murder, and asks Caldwell to accompany him as he speaks to the head of ... +


At the Presidio, a military base in San Francisco, California, Military Police officer Patti Jean Lynch arrives for evening patrol. She drives to the Presidio Officers Club and sees a silver Lincoln car. Noticing the club’s door open and hearing voices inside, she draws her gun and enters. Inside a storage room, two men shoot and kill her before escaping in the Lincoln. Afterward, San Francisco Patrolmen Schmidt and Dotson see the speeding Lincoln and chase it. The killers shoot the police cruiser, causing it to crash, killing the patrolmen. Later, San Francisco Police Inspector Jay Austin is called into his lieutenant’s office, and assigned to investigate the shooting at the Presidio. Austin, the lieutenant believes, is the best candidate, since he was stationed at the Presidio as an M.P. before joining the San Francisco police department. At the Presidio, Jay runs into his friend M.P. Zeke, who tells him the victim is Patti Jean Lynch, Jay’s former partner. Jay finds Lt. Colonel Alan Caldwell, Presidio Provost Marshal, and Jay’s former commanding officer. Jay informs Caldwell the city police will take over the investigation. Caldwell warns Jay not to cross him while he is on the base. After Caldwell leaves, Jay notices a potted plant filled with water. The next morning, he arrives at Lt. Colonel Caldwell’s home. Caldwell’s adult daughter, Donna Caldwell, invites him in. Jay asks Donna to join him for dinner, and she agrees. He informs Caldwell that a Russian Tokarev pistol was used in the murder, and asks Caldwell to accompany him as he speaks to the head of the base firing range, Sergeant Garfield. He wants to find out if anyone on base has a Tokarev pistol. They drive to the Presidio. Sergeant Garfield recently repaired a Tokarev for Colonel Paul Lawrence, a high-ranking officer on base. Back at his home, Caldwell reads Colonel Lawrence’s file, as Donna gets ready for her date with Jay. He attempts to dissuade Donna from dating Jay. He tells her that as M.P.s, Jay and Patti Jean Lynch pulled over an intoxicated Colonel Paul Lawrence, and that Jay beat him up before arresting him. Donna would like to hear Jay’s side of the story. Unsatisfied with her response, Caldwell forbids her from going out with Jay. Not caring, Donna leaves. At dinner, Jay tells her about punching Lawrence once after he resisted arrest and was belligerent to Patti Jean. Caldwell sided with Colonel Lawrence because he was a superior officer, and Jay quit the army shortly thereafter. Donna suggests they leave and spend time together. Jay follows Donna in his car. However, Donna begins driving erratically and Jay loses her. When he parks at his apartment, he finds Donna waiting. They kiss, and Jay carries her inside. The next day at the Presidio, Jay and Caldwell meet with Colonel Lawrence. Caldwell requests Lawrence turn over his pistol, but Lawrence says he lost the gun in a poker game. When Jay asks who won the gun, Lawrence orders Jay out of his office. Caldwell and Jay go to the shooting range and ask Sergeant Garfield if he fired the gun after repairing it. Garfield says yes and finds a bullet for them to compare with the one that killed Patti Jean. Before leaving, Jay invites Caldwell to join him as he interviews Arthur Peale, a businessman who reported his silver Lincoln stolen. Caldwell instructs Jay to pick him up at the Presidio Army Museum later. At the museum, Sgt. Major Ross Maclure gives a tour to some school children. Caldwell interrupts and tells the children about Sgt. Major Maclure’s saving his life during the Vietnam War and being awarded the Medal of Honor. After the children leave, Caldwell tells Maclure about working with Jay again, and his unhappiness over Jay dating his daughter. Arriving at Peale’s company, Transcorp, Jay and Caldwell meet Peale and his assistant, Mark. While Jay speaks to Peale, Caldwell notices bar coasters from Saigon, Vietnam, on the table. Afterward, Caldwell and Jay go to a bar for a cup of coffee. A man at the bar bothers Caldwell by calling him “Major,” and Caldwell knocks the man unconscious. Later at the Officers Club, Caldwell looks once again in the storage room for clues, and finds one open water cooler bottle. Meanwhile, Jay receives a call from M.P. Zeke, informing him that Colonel Lawrence is in Chinatown. When Jay informs Lawrence that a bullet fired from his pistol matched the one that killed Patti Jean, Lawrence hits him and runs away. Jay gives chase, but Lawrence is struck and killed by a yellow sports car. Later, Caldwell arrives at the scene and finds Jay. He ran a background check on Peale, and learned that he previously worked for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and was stationed in Vietnam during the time Lawrence was there. Caldwell also tells Jay about the open water cooler bottle, and Jay recalls the one watered potted plant he saw that night. At Black Mountain Spring Water, Inc. the following day, Jay flirts with the delivery dispatcher, Gloria, and obtains Presidio Officers Club deliveryman George Spota’s name and address. Caldwell tells Jay a man named George Spota served as Master Sergeant under Colonel Lawrence in Vietnam. Later, Caldwell calls a friend at the CIA and learns that Arthur Peale owns Black Mountain Spring Water, Inc. Meanwhile, Jay arrives at George Spota’s house and sees a recently-painted blue sports car, and discovers it was the yellow car that killed Lawrence. That evening, Jay accompanies Donna to a military banquet at the Presidio Officers Club. In front of Jay, Donna openly flirts with Captain Gordon. Frustrated by her lack of commitment, Jay punches Gordon and breaks up with Donna. Afterward, Caldwell finds Donna at home and she yells at him for trying to control her life. She goes to Jay’s apartment to apologize for pushing him away, and tells him she loves him. Elsewhere, the inebriated Caldwell arrives at Sgt. Major Maclure’s house, and climbs the fire escape to his window. Maclure and Caldwell climb to the roof and reminisce about their friendship through the years. The next day, Caldwell informs Jay about Peale owning Black Mountain Spring Water, Inc. In response, Jay states that George Spota killed Lawrence. The men trail Spota to Travis Air Force Base in Fairfield, California. There, he picks up a full water cooler recently arrived from the Clark Air Base in the Philippines. Jay and Caldwell assume the bottle contains smuggled goods, and that Spota delivered the wrong water to the Presidio Officers Club by mistake. Patti Jean Lynch caught him, and she was killed. Later, they follow Spota back to the water company and see him carry the Philippines water bottle inside. They see Sgt. Major Maclure enter the warehouse as well. Caldwell and Jay break into the bottling plant. Inside, Arthur Peale pours water from the bottle through a food strainer and reveals a number of diamonds, invisible in the water. Maclure arrives with a gun and tells Peale the operation is over. Peale attempts to reason with Maclure, stating it had been Lawrence, not Peale, who had blackmailed him into participating. Not caring about the consequences, Maclure states he is turning himself in. However, one of Peale’s associates knocks Maclure unconscious. Suddenly, Peale and his associates hear the building’s alarm and run. Caldwell and Jay find the empty bottle with the diamonds as Peale’s men shoot at them. Maclure regains conscious and goes after Peale. However, Peale’s assistant, Mark, shoots Maclure, making him drop his gun. Jay shoots Mark in the chest, killing him. Meanwhile, Caldwell finds Maclure as Spota shoots at him. Maclure runs for his gun and tosses it to Caldwell as Spota kills him. Caldwell kills Spota, but is fired upon by Peale. However, Jay shoots Peale, and kills him. Afterward, Caldwell asks Jay not to file a police report for two days so Maclure can be buried with his name and honor intact. Jay agrees. Days later, Caldwell speaks at Maclure’s funeral. After the service, Caldwell reconciles with Donna and accepts her relationship with Jay. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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