Promised Land (1988)

R | 92, 95 or 100 mins | Drama | 22 January 1988

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HISTORY


       Production notes state the film was one of six projects admitted to the 1984 workshop at the Sundance Institute in Park City, UT. Production notes and the 17 Oct 1986 HR article reported writer and director Michael Hoffman based the film on a shooting between two former high school classmates of in the town of Payette, Idaho. A 31 Oct 1986 LA Weekly article also reported the film to be the first that actor Robert Redford was attached to as executive producer.
       A 4 Sep 1986 DV article reported New World Pictures was attached as the film’s distributor, with production to begin in late Sep 1986. Articles in the 17 Oct 1986 HR and 31 Oct 1986 LA Weekly stated the budget for the film was $3 million. However, a 27 Jan 1987 HR brief stated Vestron Pictures obtained the rights to the film, and had a tentative release date scheduled for Nov 1987.
       The 29 Jan 1987 DV news item and a 25 Feb 1987 Var article mentioned Promised Land Productions as being associated with the film. However, Promised Land Productions is not credited onscreen.
       The DV news brief and 17 Mar 1987 HR production chart reported principal photography began 2 Jan 1987. According to studio production notes, locations included: Reno, NV, and Utah. A 17 Apr 1987 HR news brief stated the picture was filmed was “entirely in Salt Lake and Utah counties,” over six weeks with over $1.5 million paid to ... More Less


       Production notes state the film was one of six projects admitted to the 1984 workshop at the Sundance Institute in Park City, UT. Production notes and the 17 Oct 1986 HR article reported writer and director Michael Hoffman based the film on a shooting between two former high school classmates of in the town of Payette, Idaho. A 31 Oct 1986 LA Weekly article also reported the film to be the first that actor Robert Redford was attached to as executive producer.
       A 4 Sep 1986 DV article reported New World Pictures was attached as the film’s distributor, with production to begin in late Sep 1986. Articles in the 17 Oct 1986 HR and 31 Oct 1986 LA Weekly stated the budget for the film was $3 million. However, a 27 Jan 1987 HR brief stated Vestron Pictures obtained the rights to the film, and had a tentative release date scheduled for Nov 1987.
       The 29 Jan 1987 DV news item and a 25 Feb 1987 Var article mentioned Promised Land Productions as being associated with the film. However, Promised Land Productions is not credited onscreen.
       The DV news brief and 17 Mar 1987 HR production chart reported principal photography began 2 Jan 1987. According to studio production notes, locations included: Reno, NV, and Utah. A 17 Apr 1987 HR news brief stated the picture was filmed was “entirely in Salt Lake and Utah counties,” over six weeks with over $1.5 million paid to services in Utah. Editing would be completed at the Sundance Institute in Utah, and the remaining post-production work completed in London, England.
       The film, referred by the 23 Oct 1987 HR review as, The Promised Land, was screened at the 23rd Chicago International Film Festival in Chicago, IL. The 14 Jan 1988 HR also reported the film was shown at the Deauville Film Festival in 1987 in Deauville, France, and the 18 Jan 1988 DV review stated the picture was shown on 16 Jan 1988 at the U.S. Film Festival in Park City, UT. The film opened 22 Jan 1988, according to the 22 Jan 1988 NYT review.
      The film opens with the written prologue: “This film is based on a true story.” End credits state: “Promised Land was developed with the assistance of Sundance Institutetute.” End credits also state: “Special thanks to: Beryl Vertue; Michelle Satter; Irvin Kershner; Mary Goldberg; Frank Daniel; Rupert Walters; Utah Film Commission -- Leigh Von Der Esch, Lory Smith; The Completion Bond Company; Albert G. Ruben & Co.; Alpha Cine Labs -- Bob Spielholz, Cathy Main; Redman Movies And Stories -- Bryan T. Clifton; De Lane Lea Sound Centre; Doug Buttleman And Yamaha International Corporation; Baker, Schimke, Loubek & Associates; Waterside Apartments -- Marcie Andrew; Viking Discount City; General Rent-A-Car.” End credits also state: “The Producers would like to thank the people of Salt Lake City, Midvale and Lehi, and the Police Departments and Highway Patrol of Utah.”

              A 23 Feb 1985 Screen International article reported producer Beryl Vertue and her production company, Hartswood Productions, were to develop the film in association with the Oxford Film Company for approximately $5 million. Though Vertue is mentioned with a “Special thanks to” in ends credits, there are no further reports of Hartswoods Productions or Vertue’s participation in the production. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 Sep 1986
p. 1, 14.
Daily Variety
29 Jan 1987
p. 10.
Daily Variety
18 Jan 1988
p. 3, 42.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 1986
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jan 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Mar 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Apr 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 1987
p. 3, 38.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 1988.
---
LA Weekly
31 Oct 1986.
---
Los Angeles Times
22 Jan 1988
p. 1.
New York Times
22 Jan 1988
p. C.13.
Screen International
23 Feb 1985
p. 25, 31.
Variety
25 Feb 1987
p. 104, 376.
Variety
27 Jan 1988
p. 11.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Vestron Pictures & Great American Films Limited Partnership Presents
A Wildwood Production
In association with The Oxford Film Company
A film by Michael Hoffman
From Vestron Pictures, Inc.
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
Dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Elec
Generator op
Generator op
Key grip
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Best boy/Dolly grip
Grip
Grip/Elec swing
Photog, 2d unit
Asst cam, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Stills photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Story board artist
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Scenic artist
Leadman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Asst prop
Const coord
Const foreman
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
COSTUMES
Ward supv
Ward asst
Ward asst
MUSIC
Score rec
Score rec
Score rec
Synclavier programing
Mus consultant, For Vestron
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley ed
Dial ed
Dubbing mixer
Asst dubbing mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Best boy eff
Addl snow eff
MAKEUP
Make-up/Hair
Make-up/Hair
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Casting
Exec in charge of prod/Vestron
Exec in charge of prod/Vestron
Loc mgr
Prod coord
Prod secy
Scr supv
Prod auditor
Asst auditor
Best dog
Casting asst
Casting asst
Casting asst
Loc and extras casting
Transportation coord
Capt
Driver
Driver
Driver/P.A.
Shotmaker
Honeywagon
Caterer
Caterer
Caterer
Caterer asst
Craft service
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
UK prod liaison
UK prod liaison
Animal handler
Paramedic
Prod exec, For Vestron
Financial consultant, For Vestron
Post-prod exec, For Vestron
Scr consultant, For Wildwood
Addl material supplied by
STAND INS
Stunt double: Flagman 2
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
Stand-in
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
SONGS
“O Magnum Mysterium,” by Palestrina, performed by King’s College Choir, Cambridge, conducted by Philip Ledger, courtesy of EMI Records Limited, 30 Gloucester Place, London W1A 1ES
“Love Really Hurts Without You,” performed by Billy Ocean, courtesy of Black Sheep Music
“Will The Wolf Survive,” performed by Los Lobos, courtesy of Slash Records/Warner Brothers Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
+
SONGS
“O Magnum Mysterium,” by Palestrina, performed by King’s College Choir, Cambridge, conducted by Philip Ledger, courtesy of EMI Records Limited, 30 Gloucester Place, London W1A 1ES
“Love Really Hurts Without You,” performed by Billy Ocean, courtesy of Black Sheep Music
“Will The Wolf Survive,” performed by Los Lobos, courtesy of Slash Records/Warner Brothers Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Away In A Manger,” by Reba McEntire, courtesy of MCA Records
“Dreams And Promises,” preformed and written by Janey Street, produced and arranged by Michael Lloyd for Mike Curb Productions, engineered by Dan Nebenzal and Carmine Rubino.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Promised Land
Release Date:
22 January 1988
Premiere Information:
Chicago International Film Festival: October 1987
U.S. Film Festival, Park City, UT: 16 January 1988
Los Angeles and New York openings: 22 January 1988
Production Date:
2 January--mid February 1987
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
92, 95 or 100
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28699
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1984 in Ashville, Utah, David Hancock, star basketball player for the Ashville High School Titans, scores the winning point in the district basketball finals, as his girl friend, cheerleader Mary Daley, and fellow classmate Danny Rivers, known as “Senator,” cheer him on. After the game, Danny arrives at a party at Mary’s house. Danny tells Mary he is dropping out of school and running away to Arizona. Hancock arrives and Danny says good-bye. Later, Hancock tells Mary he is excited about going to college on a basketball scholarship. Mary worries about them attending different colleges, but Hancock assures her they will stay together. Two years later on December 22, Mary is home from college during winter break and shops at a local convenience store in Ashville. From his police cruiser, Hancock, now a police officer after dropping out of college, sees her. Arriving at the police station, Baines, a fellow policeman, challenges Hancock to game of basketball with a toy ball and hoop. When Baines scores a point, Hancock becomes annoyed and leaves. At a wedding chapel in Reno, Nevada, Danny Rivers marries Bev, a woman with dyed-pink hair and a wild disposition he has known for only three days. After the ceremony, Danny decides to return to Ashville and introduce Bev to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Rivers, and younger brother, Pat. In Ashville, Mary and Hancock meet in the town park. She apologizes for not telling him she was back in town. Mary also tells him she is frustrated with their long distance relationship and dating someone at school named Ray. ... +


In 1984 in Ashville, Utah, David Hancock, star basketball player for the Ashville High School Titans, scores the winning point in the district basketball finals, as his girl friend, cheerleader Mary Daley, and fellow classmate Danny Rivers, known as “Senator,” cheer him on. After the game, Danny arrives at a party at Mary’s house. Danny tells Mary he is dropping out of school and running away to Arizona. Hancock arrives and Danny says good-bye. Later, Hancock tells Mary he is excited about going to college on a basketball scholarship. Mary worries about them attending different colleges, but Hancock assures her they will stay together. Two years later on December 22, Mary is home from college during winter break and shops at a local convenience store in Ashville. From his police cruiser, Hancock, now a police officer after dropping out of college, sees her. Arriving at the police station, Baines, a fellow policeman, challenges Hancock to game of basketball with a toy ball and hoop. When Baines scores a point, Hancock becomes annoyed and leaves. At a wedding chapel in Reno, Nevada, Danny Rivers marries Bev, a woman with dyed-pink hair and a wild disposition he has known for only three days. After the ceremony, Danny decides to return to Ashville and introduce Bev to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Rivers, and younger brother, Pat. In Ashville, Mary and Hancock meet in the town park. She apologizes for not telling him she was back in town. Mary also tells him she is frustrated with their long distance relationship and dating someone at school named Ray. Upset at her confession, Hancock leaves. Later, Hancock and Baines assist local resident Mrs. Higgins rescue her cat in a tree. As Baines climbs the tree, Hancock sits with Mrs. Higgins in her living room. Believing he had been away at college, as Mrs. Higgins talks, Hancock recalls being informed by his college basketball coach that he lost his scholarship. Hancock returns home, bothered by the memory of his failure. The following day, Mary agrees to go ice staking with him. Afterward, they go a hot spring, and while reminiscing about the first time they visited the spring, they make love. Meanwhile, as Danny and Bev drive to Ashville, Bev looks through Danny’s wallet at pictures and messages from his high school friends. When she asks him why they wrote “Senator,” Danny says his father wanted Danny to become something worthwhile when he grew up. Stopping at a roadside diner, Bev worries about her appearance, and washes out her pink hair dye to make herself more presentable. They stop at a shopping center to purchase presents. However, Bev shoplifts items, including a watch for Danny’s father. Later, Danny and Bev arrive at his parents’ house. His mother tells him his father is seriously ill. After talking to his father and giving him the watch, Danny sees his father is dying. Running outside, he cries over being a disappointment. Bev follows him and suggests they go to a bar. At the bar, Danny says he does not want to go back home, and Bev becomes frustrated with his reluctance. As they argue, two friends from Danny’s high school come over, but Bev embarrasses Danny by mocking his bad fortune since leaving Ashville. When the former friends leave, Bev suggests Danny rob the convenience store so they have money before leaving town. At the store, Bev aims a gun at the clerk, and urges Danny to get the money from the register. Meanwhile, Hancock and Mary drive around town in his police cruiser. Mary asks why he did not stay enrolled in college. After losing his basketball scholarship, he tells her he wanted to live someplace where he was well known and liked. However, Mary tells him she does not want to move back to Ashville after college. As they drive into the convenience store parking lot, they see Bev inside with a gun. Hancock grabs his police gun. Seeing Hancock getting out of his car, armed, Bev takes the clerk hostage and leaves the store with Danny. Hancock does not recognize Danny and shoots, killing him and wounding Bev. As Hancock looks at Danny’s body, he remembers his former high school friend. Stunned, Hancock drives away with Mary, crying about Danny and his own lost dreams of becoming a basketball star. Later, Hancock informs Mr. Rivers he shot Danny during an attempted robbery. The following morning, Hancock arrives at the police station with Mary and sees Danny’s car. He leaves his badge and uniform on the car hood and walks away. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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