Rent-A-Cop (1988)

R | 96 mins | Comedy | 15 January 1988

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HISTORY

Items in the 14 Jul 1986 DV and 23 Jul 1986 IVar reported that director Geoff Murphy was attached to the production. However, Murphy is not credited onscreen. Although a 25 Aug 1986 DV brief noted that principal photography was scheduled to begin 13 Oct 1986, the 16 Dec 1986 HR production chart stated filming began 17 Nov 1986 with locations in Chicago, IL, and Italy. Production notes in AMPAS library files indicate that exterior locations were filmed in Chicago, while interiors were shot at the Cinecittà Studios in Rome, Italy. The 31 Dec 1986 Var stated that production took a break for the holidays on 23 Dec 1986, before resuming filming on 5 Jan 1987. The 9 Feb 1987 DV reported the completion of principal photography, two days under schedule. The dailies for the final day of filming were reportedly ruined in the laboratory, and had to be re-shot. According to the 16 Jul 1986 Var and 23 Dec 1987 HR, the budget was $12 million.
       The HR production chart listed actor James Eichling as part of the cast, but he is not credited onscreen. Marion Mertes is listed as script supervisor, but is not credited onscreen.
       As noted in the 18 Nov 1987 Var, the film was to open on 20 Nov 1987, but release was moved to 15 Jan 1988. An article in the 7 Jan 1988 HR reported that the picture would be regionally released on 200 screens on 15 Jan 1988 in New York City; northern New ... More Less

Items in the 14 Jul 1986 DV and 23 Jul 1986 IVar reported that director Geoff Murphy was attached to the production. However, Murphy is not credited onscreen. Although a 25 Aug 1986 DV brief noted that principal photography was scheduled to begin 13 Oct 1986, the 16 Dec 1986 HR production chart stated filming began 17 Nov 1986 with locations in Chicago, IL, and Italy. Production notes in AMPAS library files indicate that exterior locations were filmed in Chicago, while interiors were shot at the Cinecittà Studios in Rome, Italy. The 31 Dec 1986 Var stated that production took a break for the holidays on 23 Dec 1986, before resuming filming on 5 Jan 1987. The 9 Feb 1987 DV reported the completion of principal photography, two days under schedule. The dailies for the final day of filming were reportedly ruined in the laboratory, and had to be re-shot. According to the 16 Jul 1986 Var and 23 Dec 1987 HR, the budget was $12 million.
       The HR production chart listed actor James Eichling as part of the cast, but he is not credited onscreen. Marion Mertes is listed as script supervisor, but is not credited onscreen.
       As noted in the 18 Nov 1987 Var, the film was to open on 20 Nov 1987, but release was moved to 15 Jan 1988. An article in the 7 Jan 1988 HR reported that the picture would be regionally released on 200 screens on 15 Jan 1988 in New York City; northern New Jersey; southern Connecticut; Los Angeles, CA; San Diego, CA; Phoenix, AZ; Tucson, AZ; and Florida. The following month, the film was scheduled to open nationwide on 5 Feb 1988 and 12 Feb 1988. According to the 24 Jan 1988 LAT, the picture took in approximately $300,000 from 193 screens.
       End credits list the first name of actress Roslyn Alexander as “Rosyln.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Jul 1986
p. 3.
Daily Variety
25 Aug 1986
p. 7.
Daily Variety
9 Feb 1987
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Dec 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Dec 1987
p. 4, 22.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jan 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 1988
p. 3, 34.
Los Angeles Times
15 Jan 1988
Calendar, p. 6.
Los Angeles Times
24 Jan 1988
Calendar, p. 20.
New York Times
15 Jan 1988
Section C, p. 13.
Variety
16 Jul 1986
p. 4, 23.
Variety
23 Jul 1986
p. 9.
Variety
31 Dec 1986.
---
Variety
18 Nov 1987
p. 23.
Variety
13 Jan 1988
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Kings Road Entertainment presents
a Raymond Wagner production
a Jerry London film
Produced in Association with Zealcorp Productions Limited
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
Asst prod mgr
Asst prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir - Chicago
Asst art dir
Asst art dir/Draughtsman
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Addl film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Asst set dec
Leadman
Set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Prop master
Carpenter foreman
Carpenter foreman
Labor foreman
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Painter foreman
Painter foreman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Costumer for Mr. Reynolds
Costumer for Ms. Minnelli
Asst cost des
Cost supv
SOUND
Sd mixer
Chicago loc sd mixer
Boom op
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Supv ADR ed
Foley supv
Dolby consultant
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff consultant
Spec eff supv
Spec eff consultant - Chicago
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Main title des
Opticals
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Chief makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Scr supv
Transportation mgr
Transportation capt
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Accountant
Shooting permits
Liaison labor & work permits
Casting dir
Chicago casting
Chicago casting
Extras casting
Unit pub
Unit pub
Prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Prod asst
Asst to Miss Minnelli
Asst to Mr. Reynolds
Asst to Mr. London
Asst to dir/Prod
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
SOURCES
SONGS
“Dance The Night Away,” written and performed by Randy & Liz Jackson, published by Pantie Publications (ASCAP)
“Pleasure Seekers,” written by Keith Mansfield & T. Cox, published by KPM Music/APM (ASCAP)
“Night Stick,” written by Lenny Macaluso & Marcia Woods, performed by Linda Lawley, published by DeWalden Music/Chappell Music (BMI) and Barton Music (BMI), courtesy of Lenny Macaluso, produced by Lenny Macaluso
+
SONGS
“Dance The Night Away,” written and performed by Randy & Liz Jackson, published by Pantie Publications (ASCAP)
“Pleasure Seekers,” written by Keith Mansfield & T. Cox, published by KPM Music/APM (ASCAP)
“Night Stick,” written by Lenny Macaluso & Marcia Woods, performed by Linda Lawley, published by DeWalden Music/Chappell Music (BMI) and Barton Music (BMI), courtesy of Lenny Macaluso, produced by Lenny Macaluso
“Brave New World,” written and performed by Jay Ferguson, published by Painless Music (BMI)
“On Your Side,” written and performed by John Townsend, published by Grand Man Music (BMI)
“One Stolen Night,” written and performed by Randy Handley, published by Ruzam Music (BMI), Black Mac Music (BMI) & Home Grown Music (BMI), courtesy of Amazin Music, Inc. & Family Productions
“Silhouettes,” written by Frank Slay, Jr. and Bob Crewe, performed by The Nylons, published by Regent Music (BMI)
“Touch,” written by Leon Medica, performed by Le Roux, published by LeMed Music (BMI)
“Talahassie Lassie,” written by Frank Slay, Jr. and Bob Crewe & Frederic A. Piscariello, performed by Freddy Cannon, published by Comley Music, Inc. (ASCAP), © 1958, 1959, courtesy of Freddy Cannon
“Say That You Will,” written by Leon Medica, performed by Le Roux, published by LeMed Music (BMI)
“Travelling Snowman,” courtesy of The Southern Library of Recorded Music
“Moonlight In Hawaii,” composed by Ib Glindemann, published by Euroscreen Music (BMI), produced by Ole Georg
“We Wish You A Merry Christmas,” courtesy of The Southern Library of Recorded Music
“Those Oldies But Goodies,” written by Paul Politi and Nick Curinga, performed by Little Ceasar and The Romans, published by Golden Unlimited Music (BMI), produced by Paul Politi
“In The Swing,” written by A. Moorehouse, published by KPM Music/APM (ASCAP)
“Tape To Tape,” written and performed by Trevor Bastow
“Joy To The World,” arranged by Henrick Nielsen, published by Kronberg Publishing (BMI), produced by Ole Georg
“Attack,” written by Michael Licari and Kathy Malcolm, performed by Katherine, published by Licari Music (ASCAP) c/o Heuron Music, produced by Alex Cima/Kathy Malcolm and Michael Licari.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Rentacop
Release Date:
15 January 1988
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles, New York City, and Florida openings: 15 January 1988
nationwide openings: 5 February 1988 and 12 February 1988
Production Date:
17 November 1986--early February 1987
Copyright Claimant:
Kings Road Entertainment, Inc.
Copyright Date:
9 February 1988
Copyright Number:
PA359240
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Cameras by A.R.C.O. DUe
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
96
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28786
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Outside a hotel in Chicago, Illinois, police officer Tony Church and his team prepare for a drug bust. As an undercover officer named Lindy arrives at the dealers’s third floor room with $2 million, prostitute Della Roberts arrives to meet her client. Knocking on the wrong door, she is turned away by “Dancer,” a former police officer. After Della finds her client’s room, Church and his team arrest the drug dealers. However, Dancer appears wearing a motorcycle helmet and throws a flash grenade into the room. Opening fire with an automatic weapon, Dancer aims at the dealers and the officers, killing everyone except Tony Church. Grabbing the money and cocaine, Dancer attempts to kill Della. Church shoots, but misses, and Dancer escapes. At the police station, Church turns in his badge after Precinct Commander Wieser accuses him stealing the money for himself. Dancer stalks Della and tries to murder her. Worried, Della asks Church to protect her, but he only agrees after she reveals she has given up prostitution. Later, they run into former police officer Roger Latrele. Della recognizes Roger from a party she once worked. Breaking into the police records department, Church and Della learn that Dancer was the codename for fired officer Adam Booth. Afterward, Church and Della visit Beth Connors, Della’s former madam. Going through Beth’s files, Church notices that Alexander, the city’s top cocaine dealer, referred all the former police officers as clients, including Roger Latrele. Assuming Dancer and Roger work for Alexander, Church and Della ask Beth to get them invitations to a party at Alexander’s mansion ... +


Outside a hotel in Chicago, Illinois, police officer Tony Church and his team prepare for a drug bust. As an undercover officer named Lindy arrives at the dealers’s third floor room with $2 million, prostitute Della Roberts arrives to meet her client. Knocking on the wrong door, she is turned away by “Dancer,” a former police officer. After Della finds her client’s room, Church and his team arrest the drug dealers. However, Dancer appears wearing a motorcycle helmet and throws a flash grenade into the room. Opening fire with an automatic weapon, Dancer aims at the dealers and the officers, killing everyone except Tony Church. Grabbing the money and cocaine, Dancer attempts to kill Della. Church shoots, but misses, and Dancer escapes. At the police station, Church turns in his badge after Precinct Commander Wieser accuses him stealing the money for himself. Dancer stalks Della and tries to murder her. Worried, Della asks Church to protect her, but he only agrees after she reveals she has given up prostitution. Later, they run into former police officer Roger Latrele. Della recognizes Roger from a party she once worked. Breaking into the police records department, Church and Della learn that Dancer was the codename for fired officer Adam Booth. Afterward, Church and Della visit Beth Connors, Della’s former madam. Going through Beth’s files, Church notices that Alexander, the city’s top cocaine dealer, referred all the former police officers as clients, including Roger Latrele. Assuming Dancer and Roger work for Alexander, Church and Della ask Beth to get them invitations to a party at Alexander’s mansion in order to look for evidence. At the party, Alexander recognizes Tony Church. Upset with Beth for double-crossing him, Alexander has Dancer kill her. Later, Roger feels guilty about his association with Alexander. Meeting with Church, Roger confesses that Alexander ordered the drug bust ambush. Meanwhile, Della hears about Beth’s murder and breaks into the dead madam’s apartment, looking for information on Dancer. As she telephones Church with the name of the club where Dancer works, Dancer kills Roger. Wearing a “wire,” Della arrives at the dance club with Church. Before Della goes inside, Church kisses her. However, Dancer takes Della hostage and drives to Alexander’s mansion. Church radios his former partner, Lemar, for backup, ans follows them. At the mansion, Dancer puts on his motorcycle helmet and blinds Alexander and his henchmen with a flash grenade before killing them. Church appears and attacks Dancer by placing a flash grenade inside his motorcycle helmet. When the grenade detonates, Dancer’s head explodes. Later, Della embraces Church and announces that she will be moving in with him. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Detective


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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