Scrooged (1988)

PG-13 | 101, 111 or 115 mins | Comedy, Fantasy | 1988

Director:

Richard Donner

Cinematographer:

Michael Chapman

Production Designer:

J. Michael Riva

Production Companies:

Paramount Pictures Corp., Mirage Productions
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HISTORY

       Excerpts from several television shows and commercials appear in the film, among them, Howdy Doody , The Lone Ranger , Mr. Magoo's Christmas Carol , The Oprah Winfrey Show and The People's Court . Photography on Scrooged began in December of 1987. According to studio production notes, the Seagram’s building in New York City served as the exterior of the IBC Building and interior sets were constructed at Paramount studios in Los Angeles. A Dec 1988 Los Angeles Business Journal article reported that producer Steve Roth brought suit against the film’s co-producer Art Linson and Paramount Pictures for a portion of the net profits. Roth had been associated with the film’s development in its early stages. Roth was credited as executive producer. Scrooged received an Academy Award nomination for Best Makeup.


Academic Network participant. University of Texas, Austin. Advisor: Prof. Janet Staiger; Student: Adam Tate. FKS ... More Less

       Excerpts from several television shows and commercials appear in the film, among them, Howdy Doody , The Lone Ranger , Mr. Magoo's Christmas Carol , The Oprah Winfrey Show and The People's Court . Photography on Scrooged began in December of 1987. According to studio production notes, the Seagram’s building in New York City served as the exterior of the IBC Building and interior sets were constructed at Paramount studios in Los Angeles. A Dec 1988 Los Angeles Business Journal article reported that producer Steve Roth brought suit against the film’s co-producer Art Linson and Paramount Pictures for a portion of the net profits. Roth had been associated with the film’s development in its early stages. Roth was credited as executive producer. Scrooged received an Academy Award nomination for Best Makeup.


Academic Network participant. University of Texas, Austin. Advisor: Prof. Janet Staiger; Student: Adam Tate. FKS 09/2010 More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Dec 1988
p. 16-17.
Box Office
Jan 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Nov 1988.
---
Los Angeles Business Journal
Dec 1988
p. 8
Los Angeles Times
20 Sep 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
17 Jan 1988.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Nov 1988
p. 1, 16.
New York Times
23 Nov 1988
p. 16.
Variety
23 Nov 1988
p. 14, 16.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Paul Tuerpé
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Richard Donner Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
1st asst dir, 2d unit, New York crew
2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir, New York crew
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir, New York crew
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Co-prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl dir of photog, New York crew
Cam op, New York crew
1st asst photog
1st asst photog
1st asst photog, New York crew
2d asst photog
2d asst photog, New York crew
Steadicam op
Steadicam op, New York crew
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Chief lighting tech, New York crew
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Chief rigging grip
1st company grip
1st company grip, New York crew
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Grip
Grip
Still photog
Still photog, New York crew
Video asst, New York crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir, New York crew
Scenic artist
Set des
Set des
Illustrator
Illustrator
Art dept coord
Research coord
Art dept prod asst, New York crew
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec, New York crew
Prop master
Prop master, New York crew
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Lead person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Const coord
Const supv
Const supv
Const foreperson
Const foreperson
Labor foreperson
Labor foreperson
Paint foreperson
Scenic chargeperson, New York crew
Prod painter
Set plasterer
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Men's cost, New York crew
Women's cost, New York crew
Asst cost
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus supv
Mus supv
Mus ed
Addl orch by
Mus cond by
Mus scoring mixer
Mus rec at
SOUND
Prod mixer
Boom op
Addl boom op
Cable person
Supv sd ed
Asst sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd mixer, New York crew
Supv ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Foley by
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley rec by
Elec sd FX
Dolby stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreperson
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff, New York crew
Network computer anim
Network computer anim
Title des by
Opticals by
Spec visual eff by
Visual eff supv
Eff prod supv
Motion control photog
Op supv
Rotoscope supv
Model shop supv
Visual eff ed
Video supv & layout
Video coord
24 frame video displays by
24 frame video displays
24 frame video displays
24 frame video displays
24 frame video displays
Video image crew
Video image crew
Video image crew
Video image crew
Video image crew
Video image crew
Video image crew
Video image crew
Video image crew
DANCE
"Solid Gold" choreography by
Ballet choreographer
MAKEUP
Supv makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist, New York crew
Supv hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist, New York crew
Spec makeup eff created and des by
Spec makeup eff created and des by
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting asst
Celebrity look-alikes provided by
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr, New York crew
Prod coord, New York crew
Post prod consultant
Prod assoc
Asst to Stuart Baird
Scr consultant
Scr supv
Scr supv
Prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod auditor
Asst prod auditor
Accounting asst
Unit pub
Loc mgr
Loc liaison, New York crew
Asst to Richard Donner
Secy to Richard Donner
Secy to Richard Donner
Asst to Art Linson
Asst to Bill Murray
Asst to Bill Murray
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt, New York crew
Studio teacher
Craft service
Clip clearances
Clip clearances
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Suggested by the novel A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens (London, 1843).
SONGS
"Brown Eyed Girl," by Van Morrison, performed by Buster Poindexter, produced by Hank Medress, Buster Poindexter courtesy of RCA Records
"Christmas Must Be Tonight," written, performed & produced by Robbie Robertson, Robbie Robertson courtesy of Geffen Records
"The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire," by Mel Torme & Robert Wells, performed by Natalie Cole, produced by Jimmy Iovine, Natalie Cole courtesy of EMI, a Division of Capitol Records, Inc.
+
SONGS
"Brown Eyed Girl," by Van Morrison, performed by Buster Poindexter, produced by Hank Medress, Buster Poindexter courtesy of RCA Records
"Christmas Must Be Tonight," written, performed & produced by Robbie Robertson, Robbie Robertson courtesy of Geffen Records
"The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire," by Mel Torme & Robert Wells, performed by Natalie Cole, produced by Jimmy Iovine, Natalie Cole courtesy of EMI, a Division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Get Up 'N' Dance," by L. Mallison, M. Dewese & R. Isaacs, performed by Kool Moe Dee, produced by LaVaba, M. Dewese & Radcliff, Kool Moe Dee courtesy of Jive Records
"Hallelujah Chorus" from The Messiah by George Frideric Handel, courtesy of The Special Music Co.
"I Second That Emotion," by William Robinson & Alfred Cleveland, performed by Smokey Robinson & The Miracles, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P.
"It's Howdy Doody Time," by Edward G. Kean
"The Love You Take," written & produced by Dan Hartman, performed by Dan Hartman & Denise Lopez
"Put a Little Love in Your Heart," by Jackie De Shannon, Randy Myers & Jimmy Holiday, performed by Annie Lennox & Al Green, produced by David A. Stewart, Annie Lennox courtesy of RCA Records, a Bertelsmann Music Group Company, Al Green courtesy of A&M Records
"Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer," by Johnny Marks
"Santa Claus Is Coming to Town," by Haven Gillespie & J. Fred Coots
"Silver Bells," by Jay Livingston & Ray Evans, performed by Robert Goulet
"Smile, You're on Candid Camera," by Alan Scott & Keith Textor
"Sweetest Thing," by U2, performed by New Voices of Freedom (featuring Adriane McDonald & George Pendergrass), produced by Jimmy Iovine, Dennis Bell & Christopher Bell
"The Toy Parade," (Leave It to Beaver theme), by David Kahn, Mort Greene & Melvyn Lenard
"We Three Kings of Orient Are," music and lyrics by John H. Hopkins, performed by Miles Davis, Larry Carlton, David Sanborn & Paul Shaffer, produced by Marcus Miller, Miles Davis courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., Larry Carlton courtesy of MCA Records, David Sanborn courtesy of Reprise Records, Paul Shaffer courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc.
"A Wonderful Life," written & produced by Judson Spence & Monroe Jones, performed by Mark Lennon
"Wooly Bully," by Domingo Samudio, re-recorded by Sam the Sham & The Pharaohs, courtesy of Dominion Entertainment, Inc.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
1988
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 23 November 1988
Production Date:
began 7 December 1987
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc., & Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
9 January 1989
Copyright Number:
PA398930
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo in selected theatres
Color
Technicolor
Lenses/Prints
Lenses and Panaflex Camera by Panavision
Duration(in mins):
101, 111 or 115
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29152
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the Christmas season of 1988, Frank Cross is overseeing the live broadcast of “Scrooge.” His staff joins the youngest president in IBC Network history for a heated meeting about new ads. They view spots for “The Night the Reindeer Died” and “Father Loves Beaver,” but Frank finds the “Scrooge” promo appallingly shallow. He shows his staff his own version, one that depicts terrorism, drug use, and nuclear blasts as a scare tactic for viewers considering not spending Christmas Eve watching television. Brave executive Elliot Loudermilk confronts Frank after the meeting and challenges his superior’s inclination to run the scary ad. Elliot is promptly terminated and escorted from the building. Grace, Frank’s secretary, informs him that the boss, Preston Rhinelander is arriving soon for an unannounced meeting. Frank gulps a stiff drink and greets Preston with an obvious façade. Preston informs Frank that he’s just read research about pets watching television and forces Frank to include animal oriented gimmicks in the “Scrooge” broadcast. After escorting Preston to the elevator, Frank is greeted by Brice Cummings, prompting Frank to request a full report on Brice’s background from Grace. She, in turn, pleads with Frank to allow her to take her mute son to a much-anticipated doctor appointment. Frank concedes, and joins his brother James in the exercise room. Frank and his brother wander the streets of Manhattan and James invites Frank over for Christmas dinner. Frank expresses his distaste for such events, and heads to a ceremony where he receives an award for his humanitarianism. Elliot Loudermilk wanders the streets, drunk, crushed by his Christmas Eve termination. Upon arriving back at the network, Frank leaves his award in ... +


In the Christmas season of 1988, Frank Cross is overseeing the live broadcast of “Scrooge.” His staff joins the youngest president in IBC Network history for a heated meeting about new ads. They view spots for “The Night the Reindeer Died” and “Father Loves Beaver,” but Frank finds the “Scrooge” promo appallingly shallow. He shows his staff his own version, one that depicts terrorism, drug use, and nuclear blasts as a scare tactic for viewers considering not spending Christmas Eve watching television. Brave executive Elliot Loudermilk confronts Frank after the meeting and challenges his superior’s inclination to run the scary ad. Elliot is promptly terminated and escorted from the building. Grace, Frank’s secretary, informs him that the boss, Preston Rhinelander is arriving soon for an unannounced meeting. Frank gulps a stiff drink and greets Preston with an obvious façade. Preston informs Frank that he’s just read research about pets watching television and forces Frank to include animal oriented gimmicks in the “Scrooge” broadcast. After escorting Preston to the elevator, Frank is greeted by Brice Cummings, prompting Frank to request a full report on Brice’s background from Grace. She, in turn, pleads with Frank to allow her to take her mute son to a much-anticipated doctor appointment. Frank concedes, and joins his brother James in the exercise room. Frank and his brother wander the streets of Manhattan and James invites Frank over for Christmas dinner. Frank expresses his distaste for such events, and heads to a ceremony where he receives an award for his humanitarianism. Elliot Loudermilk wanders the streets, drunk, crushed by his Christmas Eve termination. Upon arriving back at the network, Frank leaves his award in the cab. While drinking in his office, Frank’s door explodes, and his deceased former Boss, Lew Hayward, warns Frank that three ghosts will visit him to convince him to reform. Lew strangles Frank and tosses him from the high-rise window, but Lew is only an apparition, and Frank falls back into his office. In his confusion, he dials the number of someone from his past, Claire Phillips. Because they have not spoken in fifteen years, Frank does not expect a response, but leaves a message anyway. The next day, Frank learns that his negative ad has scared an elderly woman to death. Inspired by the publicity, he heads for the set of “Scrooge.” Claire pays him a surprise visit, concerned that the message he left indicated that he was truly afraid. Frank denies this, so Claire gives him her card and loses herself in the hustle of the construction crew. Frustrated, Frank goes to lunch. At the restaurant, Preston Rhinelander reveals that he has assigned Brice Cummings to join Frank’s oversight of “Scrooge” as a consultant. Frank is immediately struck with a light head, and hallucinates that one of the waiters is engulfed in flames. He springs into action and tosses water on the innocent waiter, much to the concern of Preston and Brice. Outside, Frank hails a cab. The cab driver is the Ghost of Christmas Past! The Ghost brings Frank back to his childhood home in 1955. Frank indicates that he has control of his emotions, but upon seeing his caring mother contrasted with his angry father, Frank weeps. Next, the Ghost brings Frank to the IBC building in 1968, and Frank sees himself wandering through an office party, working as an intern while the rest of the staff is in high spirits. Frank rejects the advances of an attractive girl, but the Ghost reveals that this happened for a reason. Frank later watches himself receive a blow to the head from Claire, who is leaving a grocery store and accidentally hits him. Claire and Frank begin to date, and the Ghost brings his passenger to the happy home they shared in 1969. Finally, the Ghost brings Frank to the set of “Frisbee the Dog,” the children’s program Frank nurtured. Claire arrives, expecting Frank to join her for Christmas dinner, but he has decided to accompany his boss to a fancy restaurant. Broken-hearted, Claire separates from Frank. The Ghost disappears, and Frank finds himself back in 1988 on the “Scrooge” set. Inspired by his glimpse of the past, Frank heads to the homeless shelter operated by Claire. There, he wins the attention of a beggar named Herman. Claire discovers Frank and he invites her to dinner. A disagreement over the competence of Claire’s staff causes them to separate once again. Back at the studio, Frank is troubled to find that Brice has taken over directorial duties. Brice ignores Frank, and as the cast and crew head to lunch, the studio lights flicker out. The Ghost of Christmas Present arrives and takes Frank to Grace’s home. Frank sees that Grace’s son, Calvin, has been rendered mute from trauma. The family lives in poverty, and Frank realizes he must offer Grace a raise. Next, the Ghost shows Frank the Christmas gathering at his brother’s house. James admits to his guests that he misses his brother and wishes he were with them. Finally, the Ghost sends Frank to the sewer, where he finds Herman frozen to death. Regretful, Frank realizes that Claire could have saved Herman. Frank breaks down a nearby door and is once again at the studio. Brice and Grace send the frazzled Frank to his office to watch the broadcast. The frightening Ghost of Christmas Future almost captures Frank, but is interrupted when Elliot Loudermilk barges in wielding a shotgun. Elliot is determined to shoot his former boss, but Frank manages to escape to an elevator. The Future Ghost is inside waiting for him, and brings Frank to see that young Calvin will be committed to an asylum and Claire will become an insensitive socialite. Finally, the Ghost allows Frank to view his own cremation. As he sees himself lying in the burning coffin, Frank is overcome with panic, but he suddenly reappears at his own office, brimming with joy. He rehires Elliot at a substantial salary increase, and the two hijack the “Scrooge” broadcast. Frank addresses the world, saying that he is a changed man, and that everyone watching can experience the same renewed sense of life fulfillment as the cast, crew and audience join in singing a Christmas Carol. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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