Split Decisions (1988)

R | 95 mins | Drama | 11 November 1988

Director:

David Drury

Writer:

David Fallon

Producer:

Joe Wizan

Cinematographer:

Timothy Suhrstedt

Production Designer:

Michael Z. Hanan

Production Company:

Wizan Film Properties
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HISTORY

Referring to the working title, Kid Gloves, the 28 Apr 1987 HR production chart stated that principal photography began on 27 Apr 1987 with locations in New York City and Los Angeles, CA. An article in the 21 Apr 1987 DV reported that the picture’s forty-eight-day shooting schedule was set for one week in New York before moving to Los Angeles. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, filming in Manhattan took place at Grand Central Station, Hell’s Kitchen, and the Gem Spa Newsstand in the East Village. Los Angeles locations included: the Los Angeles Sports Arena; the Reseda Country Club; the Resurrection Gym; and the Elks’ Club in Pasadena, CA. Before production began, actors Craig Sheffer and Jeff Fahey spent eight weeks training to box. The HR production chart and 8 May 1987 NYT article noted that Jacek Laskus was attached to the production as director of photography. However, Laskus is not credited onscreen. The 30 Jan 1987 DV and 21 Apr 1987 DV noted that the film’s budget as $9 million.
       According to the 8 May 1987 NYT, inspiration for writer David Fallon’s screenplay came from the Madison Square Garden sponsored amateur boxing organization, Kid Gloves. However, the program’s founder and former Madison Square Garden Boxing president, John F. X. Condon, was noted as being “a little disappointed and disturbed” that filmmakers did not inform the organization about using the registered Kid Gloves name, and had “turned the matter over to our lawyer.”
       A brief in the 25 Nov 1987 Var ... More Less

Referring to the working title, Kid Gloves, the 28 Apr 1987 HR production chart stated that principal photography began on 27 Apr 1987 with locations in New York City and Los Angeles, CA. An article in the 21 Apr 1987 DV reported that the picture’s forty-eight-day shooting schedule was set for one week in New York before moving to Los Angeles. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, filming in Manhattan took place at Grand Central Station, Hell’s Kitchen, and the Gem Spa Newsstand in the East Village. Los Angeles locations included: the Los Angeles Sports Arena; the Reseda Country Club; the Resurrection Gym; and the Elks’ Club in Pasadena, CA. Before production began, actors Craig Sheffer and Jeff Fahey spent eight weeks training to box. The HR production chart and 8 May 1987 NYT article noted that Jacek Laskus was attached to the production as director of photography. However, Laskus is not credited onscreen. The 30 Jan 1987 DV and 21 Apr 1987 DV noted that the film’s budget as $9 million.
       According to the 8 May 1987 NYT, inspiration for writer David Fallon’s screenplay came from the Madison Square Garden sponsored amateur boxing organization, Kid Gloves. However, the program’s founder and former Madison Square Garden Boxing president, John F. X. Condon, was noted as being “a little disappointed and disturbed” that filmmakers did not inform the organization about using the registered Kid Gloves name, and had “turned the matter over to our lawyer.”
       A brief in the 25 Nov 1987 Var noted that the title was changed to Split Decisions before the picture’s anticipated 5 Jan 1988 release date.
       Three months later, the 16 Feb 1988 DV reported that the picture held its world premiere on 11 Feb 1988 at the Olympic Film Festival in Calgary, Canada, preceding the 1988 Winter Olympics.
       The 29 May 1988 LAT mentioned the film had a new release date for Jul 1988. However, an item in the 2 Nov 1988 Var reported that the U.S. premiere was scheduled for 5 Nov 1988 at the Las Vegas Hilton in Las Vegas, NV, followed six days later by the picture’s 11 Nov 1988 nationwide release.
       The screenplay marks writer David Fallon’s feature film debut. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
30 Jan 1987
p. 1, 40.
Daily Variety
21 Apr 1987
p. 6.
Daily Variety
16 Feb 1988
p. 2, 5.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Apr 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
29 May 1988
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
15 Nov 1988
Calendar, p. 7.
New York Times
8 May 1987
Section C, p. 8.
Variety
25 Nov 1987
p. 1.
Variety
2 Nov 1988
p. 28.
Variety
16 Nov 1988
p. 18.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Co-Starring:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
New Century Entertainment Corporation Presents
A Wizan Film Properties, Inc. Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Unit prod mgr, New York unit
2d asst dir, New York unit
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Focus puller
2d asst cam
Gaffer
Gaffer
Best boy
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Key grip/Dolly grip
Best boy
Grip
2d cam op
Steadicam op
Steadicam op
Video tech/cam
Video cam
Video cam
Still photog
Cam op, New York unit
1st asst cam, New York unit
2d asst cam, New York unit
Steadicam op, New York unit
Gaffer, New York unit
Best boy, New York unit
Elec, New York unit
Elec, New York unit
Elec, New York unit
Elec, New York unit
Key grip, New York unit
Best boy, New York unit
Dolly grip, New York unit
Grip, New York unit
Grip, New York unit
Grip, New York unit
Still photog, New York unit
Cam & lenses provided by
Elec and grip equip provided by
Cranes and dollys by
ART DIRECTORS
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst props
Swing gang
Swing gang
Set dresser
Const coord
Lead carpenter
Carpenter
Paint foreman
Set painter
Set painter
Set dec, New York unit
Asst props, New York unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
1st asst costumer
2d asst costumer
Seamstress
Asst ward, New York unit
MUSIC
Mus ed
Synthesizer, Basil Poledouris music
Synthesizer, Basil Poledouris music
Scoring rec eng, Basil Poledouris music
Scoring rec eng, Basil Poledouris music
Mus consultant, Basil Poledouris music
SOUND
Supv sd ed
ADR ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd mixer
Cableman
Sd mixer, New York unit
Boom, New York unit
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
Titles and opticals
Spec eff, New York unit
MAKEUP
Spec makeup
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Addl hairstylist
Makeup/Hair, New York unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Visual consultant
Fights staged by
Scr supv
Unit pub
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Extras casting
Extras coord
First aid
Prod accountant
Prod coord
Asst accountant
Prod secy
Asst to Mr. Wizan
Prod assoc
Secy to Mr. Drury
Craft service
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Security
Tech advisor
Prod asst
Prod asst
Loc mgr, New York unit
Prod coord, New York unit
Prod accountant, New York unit
Extras casting, New York unit
Teamster capt, New York unit
Teamster co-capt, New York unit
Craft service, New York unit
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Film processing by
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Spirit Of Man," written by Chris deBurgh, performed by Chris deBurgh, courtesy of A&M Records, Rondor Music, Ltd. [London].
PERFORMER
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Kid Gloves
Release Date:
11 November 1988
Premiere Information:
Olympic Film Festival premiere: 11 Feb 1988; Las Vegas, NV premiere: 5 Nov 1988; Los Angeles and New York openings: 11 Nov 1988
Production Date:
began 27 Apr 1987
Copyright Claimant:
New Century Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 March 1988
Copyright Number:
PAu001119660
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded in Ultra-Stereo®
Color
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28937
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, Eddie McGuinn, undefeated amateur boxer and candidate for the 1988 Olympic boxing team, announces his acceptance into college at his family’s boxing gym, Patty Flood Boxing Club. Eddie’s father, Dan McGuinn, and grandfather, “Pop” McGuinn, take him out to celebrate. Later, Eddie watches his older brother, Ray McGuinn, box in a professional match on television. Dan refuses to watch, upset that his son, Ray, left the gym to become a prizefighter. For an upcoming fight against Julian "Snake" Pedroza, Ray returns home. At the train station, Eddie brings Barbara Uribe, Ray’s former girl friend, to greet his brother. However, Barbara leaves when she sees Ray kiss another woman. Ray invites Eddie to the fight press party and to meet his new trainer, Lou Rubia, but Dan does not want his son, Eddie associating with Lou, who has ties to organized crime. Ignoring his father, Eddie goes to the party and meets Benny Pistone, a shady businessman and former criminal. Later, Lou informs Ray McGuinn that Pistone wants him to take a dive in his bout with Pedroza, and will pay close to $20,000. Reluctantly, Ray agrees. Afterward, Ray goes to watch Eddie fight at The Patty Flood Boxing Club. During Eddie’s match, Lou, Pistone and Pedroza arrive. After Eddie wins, Lou congratulates him, but Dan McGuinn orders Lou and Pistone to stay away from Eddie. Feeling guilty about accepting Pistone’s money, Ray confesses to Eddie that he was ordered to throw his match. Planning to leave Lou’s training, Ray announces he will not fight Pedroza. As Lou drives ... +


In New York City, Eddie McGuinn, undefeated amateur boxer and candidate for the 1988 Olympic boxing team, announces his acceptance into college at his family’s boxing gym, Patty Flood Boxing Club. Eddie’s father, Dan McGuinn, and grandfather, “Pop” McGuinn, take him out to celebrate. Later, Eddie watches his older brother, Ray McGuinn, box in a professional match on television. Dan refuses to watch, upset that his son, Ray, left the gym to become a prizefighter. For an upcoming fight against Julian "Snake" Pedroza, Ray returns home. At the train station, Eddie brings Barbara Uribe, Ray’s former girl friend, to greet his brother. However, Barbara leaves when she sees Ray kiss another woman. Ray invites Eddie to the fight press party and to meet his new trainer, Lou Rubia, but Dan does not want his son, Eddie associating with Lou, who has ties to organized crime. Ignoring his father, Eddie goes to the party and meets Benny Pistone, a shady businessman and former criminal. Later, Lou informs Ray McGuinn that Pistone wants him to take a dive in his bout with Pedroza, and will pay close to $20,000. Reluctantly, Ray agrees. Afterward, Ray goes to watch Eddie fight at The Patty Flood Boxing Club. During Eddie’s match, Lou, Pistone and Pedroza arrive. After Eddie wins, Lou congratulates him, but Dan McGuinn orders Lou and Pistone to stay away from Eddie. Feeling guilty about accepting Pistone’s money, Ray confesses to Eddie that he was ordered to throw his match. Planning to leave Lou’s training, Ray announces he will not fight Pedroza. As Lou drives Ray to tell Pistone in person that the fight is off, they are followed by two of Dan and Pop’s amateur boxers, Rudy and Coop. Arriving at an abandoned warehouse, Coop telephones Eddie, and Rudy keeps watch on Ray. After Pistone refuses to let Ray out of the deal, Ray punches Pistone in the face. At Pistone’s order, Pedroza appears and throws Ray out the window, killing him. Witnessing Ray’s murder, Rudy runs away. After Ray’s funeral, Barbara and Eddie try to comfort one another. They kiss, but Eddie pulls away, ashamed of his feelings for Ray’s former girl friend. Later, Coop finds Rudy and leads Eddie and Barbara to his hiding place. Hearing that Pedroza killed Ray on Pistone’s order, Eddie wants Rudy to go to the police. However, fearing for his life, Rudy refuses. To avenge Ray’s death, Eddie tells Dan and Pop he wants to box against Pedroza. Dan reminds Eddie that he would need to become a professional boxer and would no longer be considered for the Olympic team. However, Eddie challenges Pedroza. Although upset about the match, Pop convinces Dan not to abandon his remaining son and they train Eddie together. On the night of the fight, Eddie announces it will be his last, as he no longer finds joy in the sport. Throughout the first rounds, Pedroza takes cheap shots and causes Eddie severe injuries. However, Eddie senses that Pedroza is getting tired. Punching Pedroza repeatedly, Eddie wins by a "technical knockout." Meanwhile, Rudy watches the fight on television and inspired by Eddie, goes to the police. As police arrive and arrest Pedroza, Eddie, Dan and Pop celebrate their victory. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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