Stormy Monday (1988)

R | 93 mins | Drama, Romance | 22 April 1988

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HISTORY

An article in the 21 Jan 1990 NYT reported that the project was originally written in treatment form by writer-director Mike Figgis and presented to producer David Puttnam. However, after considering for a year, Puttnam did not become involved with the project.
       According to a 24 Jul 1987 DV studio production chart, principal photography for Stormy Monday began 6 Jul 1987 in Newcastle, England. As noted in the 4 May 1988 LAT, the budget was approximately $4 million. Studio notes in AMPAS library files explain that Figgis was familiar with the industrial city of Newcastle and wrote the story to fit in places he knew. He also worked Newcastle’s then-current extensive redevelopment into the film. Actor-singer Sting, who grew up in Newcastle, used his native accent for his role as “Finny.”
       The picture was released in two New York City theaters on 22 Apr 1988, as stated in the NYT review published the same day. A trade advertisement in the 28 Apr 1988 DV stated that during its first four days in New York, the film took in $49,343 at the box-office. The following week, the film opened in Los Angeles, CA.
       The film was Mike Figgis’s feature writing and directorial debut.
       End credits acknowledge the following: “Weegee Photographs used by Permission of Wilma Wilcox and Side Gallery; Key Club photographs by William Gottlieb and David Redfern, supplied by David Redfern Photography, London; Jaguar courtesy of Jaguar Cars Limited; Porsche courtesy of Gordon Ramsay Limited, Newcastle; Mercedes courtesy of Minories Limited, Newcastle; Police Cars courtesy of Vauxhall Cars Limited.” End ... More Less

An article in the 21 Jan 1990 NYT reported that the project was originally written in treatment form by writer-director Mike Figgis and presented to producer David Puttnam. However, after considering for a year, Puttnam did not become involved with the project.
       According to a 24 Jul 1987 DV studio production chart, principal photography for Stormy Monday began 6 Jul 1987 in Newcastle, England. As noted in the 4 May 1988 LAT, the budget was approximately $4 million. Studio notes in AMPAS library files explain that Figgis was familiar with the industrial city of Newcastle and wrote the story to fit in places he knew. He also worked Newcastle’s then-current extensive redevelopment into the film. Actor-singer Sting, who grew up in Newcastle, used his native accent for his role as “Finny.”
       The picture was released in two New York City theaters on 22 Apr 1988, as stated in the NYT review published the same day. A trade advertisement in the 28 Apr 1988 DV stated that during its first four days in New York, the film took in $49,343 at the box-office. The following week, the film opened in Los Angeles, CA.
       The film was Mike Figgis’s feature writing and directorial debut.
       End credits acknowledge the following: “Weegee Photographs used by Permission of Wilma Wilcox and Side Gallery; Key Club photographs by William Gottlieb and David Redfern, supplied by David Redfern Photography, London; Jaguar courtesy of Jaguar Cars Limited; Porsche courtesy of Gordon Ramsay Limited, Newcastle; Mercedes courtesy of Minories Limited, Newcastle; Police Cars courtesy of Vauxhall Cars Limited.” End credits state: “The Producers Would Like To Thank: Autoglass Limited; Contemporary Props Limited; Ford Motor Company Limited; Hill International Limited; Newcastle International Airport; Bournemouth International Airport; F.R. Aviation Limited; Peaches and Cream Lingerie; Northumbria Police; Northumbria Ambulance Service; Newcastle City Council; South Tyneside Council; the Newcastle Polish Community; the Bands, Cadets, Majorettes; and all who took part in the parade and the Residents and Business Community of the Quayside; and the City of Newcastle.” End credits also state: “Made on location in Newcastle Upon Tyne.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
24 Jul 1987
p. 10.
Daily Variety
28 Apr 1988
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Apr 1988
p. 3, 39.
Los Angeles Times
29 Apr 1988
Calendar, p. 1, 20.
Los Angeles Times
4 May 1988
Calendar, p. 1, 12.
Los Angeles Times
25 Jul 2003
Calendar, p. 18.
New York Times
22 Apr 1988
Section C, p. 3.
New York Times
21 Jan 1990
Section A, p. 11.
Variety
20 Apr 1988
p. 7.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Atlantic Entertainment Group
In association with British Screen and
Film Four International present
A Moving Picture Company Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit mgr
Asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Focus puller
Clapper loader
Cam asst
Stills
Gaffer elec
Best boy
Elec
Genny op
Addl elec
Addl elec
Cam and lenses by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept asst
Runner
FILM EDITORS
Post-prod facilities
SET DECORATORS
Prop buyer
Prop master
Dressing prop
Standby prop
Standby prop
Const mgr
Standby carpenter
Standby painter
Standby rigger
Standby stage hand
Runner
Const services
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Runner
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus supv
Mus coord
Mus coord
Rec at
Prod by
Orig score comp by
Co-prod by
SOUND
Boom op
Jobfit trainee
Dubbing ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Jobfit trainee
Dubbing mixer
Asst dubbing mixer
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
MAKEUP
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
U.S. casting
U.S. casting
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Prod asst
Prod's asst
Runner
Runner
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Scr supv
Prop van driver
Ward/makeup van driver
Cam car driver
Props/const wagon driver
Winnebago driver
Winnebago driver
Winnebago driver
Caterer
Caterer
Transport
Addl transport
Catering
Armourers
Office systems by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Majorettes coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
SONGS
“I’ve Been Loving You Too Long,” performed by Otis Redding, words and music by Otis Redding and Jerry Butler, used by permission of Greenwich Music Limited, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“The Thrill Is Gone,” performed by B. B. King, written by Roy Hawkins and Rick Ravon Darnell, published by Sounds of Lucille and Powerforce, courtesy of MCA Records, “(Call It) Stormy Monday,” by Aaron T. Walker, © 1948 Gregmark Music Inc, performed by B. B. King, courtesy of MCA Records. ["The Star Spangled Banner," performed by The Krakow Jazz Ensemble.]
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 April 1988
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 22 April 1988
Los Angeles opening: 29 April 1988
Production Date:
began 6 July 1987
Copyright Claimant:
National Film Trustee Company, Ltd.
Copyright Date:
2 May 1988
Copyright Number:
PA388665
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Photographed on AGFA XT Colour Negative
Duration(in mins):
93
Length(in feet):
8,378
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29003
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Newcastle, England, the city celebrates America Week while Brendan, a young Irishman, applies for a position as a janitor at the Key Club. The club’s owner, Finney, hires Brendan and orders him to pick up The Krakow Jazz Ensemble, a Polish band scheduled to perform the following evening. As Brendan drops the band at the Royal Station Hotel, American businessman Francis Cosmo arrives to oversee the final preparations for a luncheon celebrating his upcoming city development deal. To insure the deal will go through, Cosmo telephones an American employee, Kate, to attend the luncheon and seduce City Councilor John Perry. After she reluctantly agrees, Kate goes to her new waitress job at Weegee’s restaurant, where she happens to wait on Brendan. While eating lunch, Brendan overhears Patrick and Tony at the next table discuss plans to threaten Key Club owner Finney the following day into selling the club, as per Francis Cosmo’s orders. Before leaving to warn Finney, Brendan asks Kate to meet him for drinks after her shift. Learning that Finney is at his other club, The Precinct, Brendan meets Kate at a bar across the street and keeps an eye on The Precinct’s entrance. When he sees Finney leave, Brendan joins him, but the otherwise engaged club owner instructs him to meet him the next morning. Later, Finney informs Brendan that Cosmo has been pressuring him to sell Key Club to make way for his urban development plans. When Patrick and Tony arrive at the club and demand that Finney sign it over to Cosmo, Finney’s men appear with shotguns. As a warning to Cosmo, Finney breaks Tony’s arm and orders him and Patrick to leave ... +


In Newcastle, England, the city celebrates America Week while Brendan, a young Irishman, applies for a position as a janitor at the Key Club. The club’s owner, Finney, hires Brendan and orders him to pick up The Krakow Jazz Ensemble, a Polish band scheduled to perform the following evening. As Brendan drops the band at the Royal Station Hotel, American businessman Francis Cosmo arrives to oversee the final preparations for a luncheon celebrating his upcoming city development deal. To insure the deal will go through, Cosmo telephones an American employee, Kate, to attend the luncheon and seduce City Councilor John Perry. After she reluctantly agrees, Kate goes to her new waitress job at Weegee’s restaurant, where she happens to wait on Brendan. While eating lunch, Brendan overhears Patrick and Tony at the next table discuss plans to threaten Key Club owner Finney the following day into selling the club, as per Francis Cosmo’s orders. Before leaving to warn Finney, Brendan asks Kate to meet him for drinks after her shift. Learning that Finney is at his other club, The Precinct, Brendan meets Kate at a bar across the street and keeps an eye on The Precinct’s entrance. When he sees Finney leave, Brendan joins him, but the otherwise engaged club owner instructs him to meet him the next morning. Later, Finney informs Brendan that Cosmo has been pressuring him to sell Key Club to make way for his urban development plans. When Patrick and Tony arrive at the club and demand that Finney sign it over to Cosmo, Finney’s men appear with shotguns. As a warning to Cosmo, Finney breaks Tony’s arm and orders him and Patrick to leave for London on the next train. To reward Brendan for his tip-off, Finney gives him the key to Patrick’s car, a Jaguar. Reaching London, Tony and Patrick telephone Cosmo. Angry, Cosmo orders Bob to beat up Brendan for interfering with his plans. Later, Andrej, a member of The Krakow Jazz Ensemble, invites Brendan and Kate to a Polish social club, but later, as Brendan and Kate leave in his new Jaguar, Cosmo’s associate, Bob, signals Brendan to pull over. Bob and a henchman attack Brendan, and when Kate attempts to fight them off, they punch her, too. Taking a gun from the glove compartment, Brendan kills the henchman. Brendan and Kate flee to the Royal Station Hotel and hide in Andrej’s room. The following morning, Finney meets Cosmo and agrees to sell his property for a high price. Elsewhere, Kate confesses she knows Bob works for Cosmo, and they need to leave town. Driving Brendan’s car to her apartment to pack, Kate is surprised by Cosmo. He offers her two airplane tickets on the next flight out of London. Meanwhile, one of Cosmo’s associates plants a bomb in Brendan’s car to detonate at midnight. When Kate picks up Brendan, she tells him about the airline tickets, but Brendan earlier heard a radio report stating the airline had cancelled all its flights. Suspicious, he sends Kate to the Key Club to talk to Finney. At the club, Andrej and Christine ask to borrow Brendan’s car, and she hands them the keys. Kate and Brendan enter Finney’s office as he signs over the club to Cosmo. Outside, the Jaguar explodes, killing Andrej and Christine. Brendan aims his gun at Cosmo, but Finney calls him off, declaring that the American is not worth killing. Tearing up the contract, Finney orders Cosmo to leave Newcastle and stay away from Brendan and Kate. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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