Track 29 (1988)

R | 86 or 90 mins | Drama | 9 September 1988

Director:

Nicolas Roeg

Writer:

Dennis Potter

Producer:

Rick McCallum

Cinematographer:

Alex Thomson

Editor:

Tony Lawson

Production Designer:

David Brockhurst

Production Company:

Handmade Films
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HISTORY

       Mistakenly referring to the title as Track 39, the 22 Jul 1983 DV reported that principal photography would take place in Dallas, TX, with director Joseph Losey, and featuring actress Vanessa Redgrave, actor Lee Marvin, and actress Louise Fletcher. The 26 Jul 1983 DV announced the film would begin principal photography on 15 Aug 1983 in Dallas, TX, on an estimated budget of $2,100,000. The drama department of the British Broadcasting Corp. (BBC) and Pennies From Heaven Co. were listed as the film’s production companies. The 29 Jul 1983 DV production chart stated filming was to start on 16 Aug 1983, one day later than previously reported. Also attached to the production were director of photography Ken Westbury and executive producer Kenith Trodd. A month later, the 24 Aug 1983 Var, again referring to the film as Track 39, reported that “financing fell apart,” and Joseph Losey had moved on to direct the British film Steaming (1985), starring Redgrave. However, an article in the 14 Dec 1983 Var reported that filming on the picture “was shelved” due to a disagreement between the BBC and their “rule that all BBC films be made in 16m[m],” and the film’s producers wanting to shoot 35mm film.
       Three years later, a 19 Nov 1986 DV item reported principal photography on Track 29 would begin in early 1987 in Texas with Nicolas Roeg directing and featuring Roeg’s wife, actress Theresa Russell. While the 24 Feb 1987 HR announced that filming would begin in Apr ... More Less

       Mistakenly referring to the title as Track 39, the 22 Jul 1983 DV reported that principal photography would take place in Dallas, TX, with director Joseph Losey, and featuring actress Vanessa Redgrave, actor Lee Marvin, and actress Louise Fletcher. The 26 Jul 1983 DV announced the film would begin principal photography on 15 Aug 1983 in Dallas, TX, on an estimated budget of $2,100,000. The drama department of the British Broadcasting Corp. (BBC) and Pennies From Heaven Co. were listed as the film’s production companies. The 29 Jul 1983 DV production chart stated filming was to start on 16 Aug 1983, one day later than previously reported. Also attached to the production were director of photography Ken Westbury and executive producer Kenith Trodd. A month later, the 24 Aug 1983 Var, again referring to the film as Track 39, reported that “financing fell apart,” and Joseph Losey had moved on to direct the British film Steaming (1985), starring Redgrave. However, an article in the 14 Dec 1983 Var reported that filming on the picture “was shelved” due to a disagreement between the BBC and their “rule that all BBC films be made in 16m[m],” and the film’s producers wanting to shoot 35mm film.
       Three years later, a 19 Nov 1986 DV item reported principal photography on Track 29 would begin in early 1987 in Texas with Nicolas Roeg directing and featuring Roeg’s wife, actress Theresa Russell. While the 24 Feb 1987 HR announced that filming would begin in Apr 1987, an article in the 7 Apr 1987 HR reported a start date of 5 May 1987 at “a yet-to-be decided U.S. location,” with a tentative release scheduled for Feb 1988.
       Filming began on 7 May 1987 in North Carolina, as stated in the 28 Apr 1987 HR production chart. Production notes in AMPAS library files state filming took place on locations around Wilmington, NC, as well as at the Dino De Laurentiis Studios. Filming also took place at the North Carolina Trainorama, an annual railroad train-themed festival, on 21 Jun 1987. The 29 Jul 1987 Var reported that the picture would film in London, England “after North Carolina locations.” According to production notes, filming lasted approximately seven weeks on an accelerated “six-day” week schedule. The 8 Sep 1987 HR announced that principal photography was complete. The 15 Sep 1988 LAT reported the film’s budget to be approximately $3 million.
       The film was screened on 15 May 1988 at the Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, France, as noted in the 25 May 1988 Var review. An article in the 18 May 1988 Var reported that producer Rick McCallum believed the film would be released in the U.S. in late Jul 1988. However, the picture was released on 9 Sep 1988 in New York City, as noted in the NYT review published that day. The following week, an advertisement in the 9-15 Sep 1988 LA Weekly announced the picture was opening on 14 Sep 1988 in Los Angeles, CA.
       The 25 May 1988 Var review noted the film was eighty-six minutes long, while reviews in the 14 Sep 1988 HR and 9 Sep 1988 NYT listed the film’s running time as ninety minutes. The print viewed for this record was ninety minutes.
       An article in the 15 Sep 1988 LAT noted that the film was based on a television play called Schmoedipus, written by screenwriter Dennis Potter in 1974 for the BBC.
      End credits state “Special Thanks to: Hans Zimmer and Allan Corduner.” End credits list the following the clips used in the film: “Dangermouse,” created by Cosgrove Hall Productions of Great Britain; “Cape Fear,” courtesy of Universal City Studios; “Rocky & Bullwinkle, Tennessee Tuxedo, Underdog, King Leonardo,” courtesy of Filmtel International Corporation; “Azalea Festival,” courtesy of WWAY-TV Wilmington N.C. End credits also state: “The Producer gratefully acknowledges the assistance of everyone at DEG, Nelly Nugiel, Bobby Blues, Compaq Computer Ltd., David & Ann Caudle, Neil Harrison, Carol at Crimpers, the Pinnacle Care Center, PM Promotions, D.A.R.E. Inc., the cities of Wilmington & Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, and all at 26 Cadogan Square.” The picture concludes with the following: “Made at DEG Film Studios, Wilmington, North Carolina.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
22 Jul 1983
p. 3.
Daily Variety
26 Jul 1983
p. 14.
Daily Variety
29 Jul 1983
p. 14.
Daily Variety
19 Nov 1986
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Apr 1987
p. 1, 65.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Apr 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Sep 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Sep 1988
p. 4, 20.
LA Weekly
9-15 Sep 1988.
---
Los Angeles Times
14 Sep 1988
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
15 Sep 1988
Calendar, p. 1.
New York Times
9 Sep 1988
Section C, p. 10.
Variety
24 Aug 1983
p. 24.
Variety
14 Dec 1983
p. 34.
Variety
29 Jul 1987.
---
Variety
18 May 1988
pp. 126-127.
Variety
25 May 1988
p. 19, 23.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
HandMade Films presents
A Nicolas Roeg film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Focus puller
Clapper loader
Underwater cam
Underwater cam asst
Cam trainee
Hi-speed cam
Stills photog
Key grip
Best boy grip
Grip
Gaffer
Elec
Elec
Photog equip supplied by
Lighting equip by
Filmstock supplied by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept asst
Art dept trainee
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Dubbing ed
Asst dubbing ed
Dial ed
Footsteps ed
2d asst ed (USA)
Ed trainee (USA)
SET DECORATORS
Leadman
Prop master
Asst prop master
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Standby carpenter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Ward asst
MUSIC
Orchestrations
Mus fixer
Mus assoc
Mus rec at
Mus rec
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom swinger
Re-rec mxer
Asst re-rec mixer
Asst re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Chief model train coord
Model FX 2d unit dir
Model FX cam
Model FX cam op
Model FX focus puller
Model maker
Model maker
Model maker
Model maker
Model maker
Model maker
Model maker
Model maker
Model maker
Spec eff
Spec eff
Title des & opticals by
Title graphics by
MAKEUP
Chief makeup artist
Chief hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Prod coord
Prod's asst
Dir's asst
Prod office secy
Prod office asst
Loc mgr
Key prod asst
Prod accountant
Asst accounts
Asst accounts
Asst accounts
Scr supv
Casting dir - Los Angeles
Casting dir - Wilmington
Trainorama event coord
Transport coord
Driver
Driver
Driver
Craft service
Researcher
Immigration services
Truck supplied courtesy of
Trains supplied by
Prod budgeting by
STAND INS
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
SONGS
“M. O. T. H. E. R.,” by Theodore Morse and Fiske O’Hara, ©1915 Leo Feist Inc., used by permission of Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew, Ltd.
“Mother,” words and music by John Lennon, ©1971 Northern Songs
“When The Red Red Robin Comes Bob Bob Bobbin’ Along,” words and music by Harry Woods, ©1926 Bourne Company
+
SONGS
“M. O. T. H. E. R.,” by Theodore Morse and Fiske O’Hara, ©1915 Leo Feist Inc., used by permission of Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew, Ltd.
“Mother,” words and music by John Lennon, ©1971 Northern Songs
“When The Red Red Robin Comes Bob Bob Bobbin’ Along,” words and music by Harry Woods, ©1926 Bourne Company
“Chattanooga Choo Choo,” words by Mack Gordon, music by Harry Warren, ©1941 Twentieth Century Music Corporation assigned to SBK United Partnership
“Young At Heart,” by John Richards and Carolyn Leigh, ©1954 Times Square Music Publishing Co. and Cheerim Corp., original recording sung by Rosemary Clooney, provided courtesy of CBS Records International
“Instrumental Jamming Piece,” courtesy of Mark Johnson, Geoff Grimsman, Tony Mallard, Billy Hutchinson.
+
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Track 39
Release Date:
9 September 1988
Premiere Information:
Cannes Film Festival screening: 15 May 1988
New York opening: 9 September 1988
Los Angeles opening: 14 September 1988
Production Date:
began 7 May 1987
Copyright Claimant:
Paragon Entertainment Corporation
Copyright Date:
1 July 1996
Copyright Number:
PA0000831091
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
86 or 90
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28915
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Housewife Linda Henry lives in a small Southern town with her husband, Dr. Henry Henry, a gerontologist physician and model railroad train enthusiast. After Henry leaves for work at the clinic, Linda and her best friend, Arlanda, meet for lunch at a roadside diner. Outside of town, Martin, a hitchhiker from England, gets a ride from a passing trucker with an arm tattoo of the word “MOM.” Martin tells the trucker he never knew his mother, as he was given up for adoption when he was born. As Martin continues to tell his life story, the trucker gets annoyed and pulls over in a parking lot. Hot from the drive, the trucker takes off his shirt and reveals a chest tattoo of the word “MOTHER.” When Martin asks the meaning behind that tattoo, the trucker orders him out. Martin enters a diner and starts chatting with Linda and Arlanda. When Linda learns he is looking for his birth mother who lived in their town, she remembers the son she gave up for adoption when she was fifteen years old. Unnerved, Linda tells Arlanda they need to leave. That night, Linda sees Martin standing outside her house. She awakens Henry and tells him Martin is outside. However, Henry does not see anyone. In the morning, Linda tells Henry she wants to have a child, but Henry tells her that it would be impossible. Linda believes he is being selfish, loving his model trains more than her. Frustrated, Henry leaves for work, with Linda yelling that she will drown herself in their swimming pool. She ... +


Housewife Linda Henry lives in a small Southern town with her husband, Dr. Henry Henry, a gerontologist physician and model railroad train enthusiast. After Henry leaves for work at the clinic, Linda and her best friend, Arlanda, meet for lunch at a roadside diner. Outside of town, Martin, a hitchhiker from England, gets a ride from a passing trucker with an arm tattoo of the word “MOM.” Martin tells the trucker he never knew his mother, as he was given up for adoption when he was born. As Martin continues to tell his life story, the trucker gets annoyed and pulls over in a parking lot. Hot from the drive, the trucker takes off his shirt and reveals a chest tattoo of the word “MOTHER.” When Martin asks the meaning behind that tattoo, the trucker orders him out. Martin enters a diner and starts chatting with Linda and Arlanda. When Linda learns he is looking for his birth mother who lived in their town, she remembers the son she gave up for adoption when she was fifteen years old. Unnerved, Linda tells Arlanda they need to leave. That night, Linda sees Martin standing outside her house. She awakens Henry and tells him Martin is outside. However, Henry does not see anyone. In the morning, Linda tells Henry she wants to have a child, but Henry tells her that it would be impossible. Linda believes he is being selfish, loving his model trains more than her. Frustrated, Henry leaves for work, with Linda yelling that she will drown herself in their swimming pool. She dives into the water, but floats to the surface. Suddenly, Martin appears and asks if her maiden name was “Linda Alice Carter.” When Linda says it was, Martin announces that he is her son. To convince her, Martin tells her that he was born on the seventh of May, and adopted by a cleaning woman employed by Linda’s mother, who moved to England. Linda believes him and says she has always thought about what would have happened if she had raised Martin. Later, Linda gets into her car and Martin appears in the backseat. When she tells him they are going to the clinic to see Henry, Martin gets upset and begs her not to go. At a restaurant, Linda drinks and tells Martin she used to dream about telling him fairy tales. When the waiter asks if anything is the wrong, Linda responds she was not talking to him. After the waiter excuses himself, Linda tells Martin her story about going to the traveling carnival on her fifteenth birthday: after flirting with the man in charge of the bumper cars, who had “MOTHER” tattooed on his chest, she was taken into the woods and raped. As Linda cries over the memory, the waiter and bartender watch as she talks to herself. Elsewhere, Henry and his mistress, Nurse Stein, flirt with each other as they give an injection to Mr. Ennis, a patient. Afterward, alone in an examination room, Henry lies face down on a bed as Nurse Stein slaps his backside. Later, Henry meets with Dr. Bernard Fairmont, who informs Henry that he gave Mr. Ennis the wrong medication. Henry claims it was an accident, but Fairmont knows about Henry and Nurse Stein’s illicit affair, and fires them. Leaving the clinic, Henry and Nurse Stein arrive at the annual model train convention, Trainorama, where Henry is nervous about presenting the keynote address. However, Henry is revitalized when the speech is a success. After the convention, Henry tells Nurse Stein that he has been offered a new job and wants her leave town with him. Meanwhile, Linda and Martin return home. Martin begins to act childish, but when Linda yells at him, he kisses her. In her bedroom, Linda continues drinking while Martin writes “MOTHER” across his chest with a permanent marker and announces he plans to start reliving his childhood with his real mother. Finding Henry’s model train set in another room, Martin destroys it. Afterward, he kisses Linda, but when she opens her eyes, no one is there. Pouring herself another drink, Linda passes out and hears Martin saying goodbye. Later, Linda awakens in a panic and telephones Arlanda, asking her to come over. When Arlanda arrives, Linda tells her that she may be losing her mind and thinks Martin is still inside the house. As Arlanda checks for an intruder, Henry arrives. Seeing how Linda is acting, Henry tells Arlanda she is not mentally stable. Frustrated, Henry hits Linda across the face, but Arlanda stops him. Worried that Linda may have done something to his model trains, Henry goes upstairs, but finds the trains untouched. Linda walks Arlanda to the door and, though confused, Arlanda leaves. As Henry calls for Linda in his train room, she grabs a butcher knife. Inside the room, Martin jumps out of a closet and repeatedly stabs Henry with a butcher knife. Later in her bedroom, Linda tells herself she always knew her son would come back. In the morning, Linda drives away from the house with a suitcase, while a bloodstain spreads across the ceiling under the model train room. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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