Tucker: The Man and His Dream (1988)

PG | 111 mins | Biography, Comedy-drama | 1988

Producers:

Fred Roos, Fred Fuchs

Cinematographer:

Vittorio Storaro

Editor:

Priscilla Nedd

Production Designer:

Dean Tavoularis

Production Companies:

Lucasfilm Ltd., Zoetrope Studios
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HISTORY


       As announced in a 27 Aug 1979 DV article, director Francis Ford Coppola and Orion Pictures negotiated an “open-ended, nonexclusive pact” one week after the U.S. release of Coppola’s Apocalypse Now (1979, see entry), and Tucker: The Man and His Dream, a project Coppola had been formally developing since 1975, was expected to be distributed by Orion as part of the deal. DV noted that Coppola held meetings with actor Burt Reynolds in Jul 1979 to cast him in the role of “Preston Tucker.” Executives from United Artists who worked on Apocalypse Now left the studio to create Orion, and they contracted with Coppola to distribute “a program” of productions from Coppola’s independent studio, American Zoetrope. Orion stipulated that its financing of Coppola’s films would be shared with Zoetrope and the pictures would be released in the U.S. and Canada through a partnership with Warner Bros. Inc. Zoetrope and Orion retained rights to foreign distribution. According to an Orion representative, the studio had discussed a partnership with Coppola ever since the team of executives split from United Artists in Jan 1978, but the deal took over a year to materialize. Orion was given “first refusal” rights on all Zoetrope projects. However, after Zoetrope’s One from the Heart (1982, see entry) left Coppola bankrupt and Orion’s handling of Coppola’s The Cotton Club (1984, see entry) spurred conflict between the filmmakers, Tucker: The Man and His Dream did not become slated as an Orion release. A 27 Jan 1990 Sun Sentinel article noted that when ... More Less


       As announced in a 27 Aug 1979 DV article, director Francis Ford Coppola and Orion Pictures negotiated an “open-ended, nonexclusive pact” one week after the U.S. release of Coppola’s Apocalypse Now (1979, see entry), and Tucker: The Man and His Dream, a project Coppola had been formally developing since 1975, was expected to be distributed by Orion as part of the deal. DV noted that Coppola held meetings with actor Burt Reynolds in Jul 1979 to cast him in the role of “Preston Tucker.” Executives from United Artists who worked on Apocalypse Now left the studio to create Orion, and they contracted with Coppola to distribute “a program” of productions from Coppola’s independent studio, American Zoetrope. Orion stipulated that its financing of Coppola’s films would be shared with Zoetrope and the pictures would be released in the U.S. and Canada through a partnership with Warner Bros. Inc. Zoetrope and Orion retained rights to foreign distribution. According to an Orion representative, the studio had discussed a partnership with Coppola ever since the team of executives split from United Artists in Jan 1978, but the deal took over a year to materialize. Orion was given “first refusal” rights on all Zoetrope projects. However, after Zoetrope’s One from the Heart (1982, see entry) left Coppola bankrupt and Orion’s handling of Coppola’s The Cotton Club (1984, see entry) spurred conflict between the filmmakers, Tucker: The Man and His Dream did not become slated as an Orion release. A 27 Jan 1990 Sun Sentinel article noted that when Zoetrope filed for bankruptcy protection in 1990, Coppola owed Orion over $6 million.
       According to a Aug 1988 edition of Premiere, Coppola was first introduced to Preston Tucker’s “Tucker Torpedo” at a 1947 “The Car of Tomorrow” exhibition in New York City, NY, which he attended with his father, Carmine Coppola, as an eight year-old boy. Carmine was so impressed by Tucker’s promise to create an affordable car for all Americans that he invested $5,000 in the inventor’s new company and ordered the vehicle for his family. Young Francis was devastated to learn from his father that the automobile industry prevented the Tucker from being manufactured. Later, as an undergraduate at Hofstra University on Long Island, NY, Coppola started to research Tucker’s story at the New York Public Library with the intention of writing a tragic play that, according to the filmmaker, “started when Tucker announced his car and ended when he died, a broken man.”
       However, as Coppola began his film career in Los Angeles, CA, working on B-movie scripts for producer Roger Corman, he became distracted from the project. After moving to Northern California at the end of the 1960s and unexpectedly encountering a Tucker at a “museum of mechanical wonders,” Coppola re-envisioned the story as an homage to Frank Capra, evoking the American Dream. When Coppola met with Capra to discuss the project, the famed filmmaker reportedly told him that it was impossible to “make a Capra movie about a guy who fails” and questioned Coppola’s faith in the “American system.” Coppola then scripted the story as a musical and hired Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden and Adolph Green to write the score. This version was shelved while Coppola pursued other projects, including Apocalypse Now and One from the Heart, that precipitated both his success and his bankruptcy.
       As stated in Premiere, Coppola’s reproach of the “Hollywood establishment,” which he blamed for inhibiting his creativity and instigating the financial crisis at Zoetrope, reinforced the filmmaker’s identification with Preston Tucker. Still, Coppola nearly abandoned the project until his son, Gian-Carlo, dusted off Coppola’s vintage Torpedo and drove it in a 1985 Independence Day parade in the family’s hometown of Calistoga, CA. Coppola was reportedly so heartened by the crowd’s reception of the vehicle that he decided to renew contact with his former protégé and collaborator, George Lucas, to pitch the project. While Coppola was facing misfortune in his career, Lucas had been catapulted to the top of the “alternative moviemaking kingdom” with successes such as the Star Wars series (1977, 1980 and 1983, see entries) and was a viable financier, according to Premiere. The filmmakers had not worked together since American Graffiti (1973, see entry). Lucas told the magazine that he agreed to produce the picture not for profit, but rather because he was inspired by the premise, which he always considered an allegory for “the American Zoetrope story.” Lucas had co-founded the studio with Coppola in 1969. However, Premiere noted, Lucas was also facing new challenges at Lucasfilm after the failure of Howard the Duck (1986, see entry) and his recent divorce, and he was banking on Tucker: The Man and His Dream to revitalize Lucasfilm.
       According to Premiere, Lucas reworked the story to remove its musical facets and enhance its narrative. In response to Capra’s argument that Tucker’s life experience was not uplifting enough to carry an inspirational film and was antithetical to the American Dream, Lucas decided to emphasize Tucker’s charisma, noting that “Tucker may not have built the car, but he wasn’t defeated as a creative person.” Writer Arnold Schulman, who wrote Capra’s A Hole in the Head (1959, see entry), was hired to evoke the filmmaker’s ideology and “concoct a fanfare for the common man that also unbraided boardroom Brahmins.”
       Despite Lucas’s efforts to transform Coppola’s project into a more optimistic and commercial film, it was difficult for him to sell the $23 million picture to Hollywood studios because they were averse to investing in a project that was “unusual.” However, former Lucasfilm Ltd. vice-president Sidney Ganis, who was head of the worldwide marketing division of Paramount Pictures Corp., agreed to distribute the film. A 21 Jul 1987 DV news item announced that Paramount purchased domestic distribution rights to the production.
       Although Gian-Carlo Coppola inspired his father to rekindle the project, and was acknowledged as the guiding force behind the picture, according to Premiere, he was unable to see the film come to fruition. In May 1986, Gian-Carlo died in a boating accident in Chesapeake Bay at the age of twenty-two. The end credits contain the following dedication to Gian-Carlo: “For Gio, who loved cars.”
       Principal photography began 13 Apr 1987, according to a 17 Jul 1987 HR news item. As described in studio production notes from AMPAS library files, the cast previously spent nine days in rehearsals, which were videotaped for reference, and Coppola encouraged his actors to work as an ensemble. While production notes stated that shooting began in Sonoma, CA, Premiere reported that production started in a vacant Ford factory, built in the 1940s, in Richmond, CA. According to the two sources, the Victorian Tucker family home was shot both on location in Sonoma and on set in Richmond. The Ford factory provided the location for Tucker’s Chicago, IL, plant, as well as a sound stage for a hotel room and the Tucker home. As described in Premiere, the stages were constructed adjacent to each other so a camera could be dollied between them to “capture action that was occurring simultaneously in far-flung locales.” Production notes stated that the Tucker Corporation offices were also built inside the Ford factory in Richmond and were elevated to the second floor so that Coppola could include assembly line workers, cars and executives in the same shot. Cinematographer Vittorio Storaro used an innovative “dimmer board” to capture subtle changes in light as time progressed during various sequences in the film. Coppola also utilized a technique he initiated in the production of One from the Heart called Electronic Cinema which enabled him to edit the picture during principal photography by simultaneously shooting the picture on film and on video. The end credits of Tucker: The Man and His Dream refer to the process in the following written statement: “Electronic Cinema®, Zoetrope Studios in cooperation with Sony Corporation®.” For more information on Electronic Cinema, please see the AFI Catalog entry for One from the Heart.
       A 5 Aug 1988 HR article listed San Rafael, Oakland and the Civic Center in San Francisco as additional CA locations used to represent Chicago, Detroit and Ypsilanti, MI. On 17 Jul 1987, HR announced that principal photography concluded after a thirteen-week shoot. A post-production schedule, lasting up to nine months, was anticipated at Lucas’s Skywalker Ranch and Coppola’s Zoetrope offices in San Francisco.
       As described in Premiere, Coppola was praised by Tucker’s family members for his accuracy. Coppola acquired actual film stock from the unveiling of the Tucker Torpedo in Chicago and replicated it shot for shot. Coppola also used twenty-two of the forty-six remaining Tuckers after convincing members of the Tucker Automoblie Club of America to participate in the film. On 18 Jul 1990, Lucasfilm and Coppola were sued by the owner of a prototype Tucker engine who alleged that the filmmakers “sandblasted and polished” the motor, effectively destroying its value, according to a 23 Jul 1990 LAT news item.
       A 1 Jun 1987 People news item reported that actor Jeff Bridges broke his right hand during the scene in which his character, Preston Tucker, hits a wall. When Bridges returned to the set from the hospital the same day, he injured his left fist during retakes. Production notes stated that Tucker: The Man and His Dream was the first picture in which Bridges and his father, Lloyd Bridges, worked together. Neither Lloyd Bridges nor his character, “Senator Ferguson,” are credited in the film.
       The film initiated the use of an innovative audio technique for the visually impaired at a 4 Aug 1988 benefit screening in Northern California, according to a 3 Aug 1988 Var news item. Developed by blind educator Dr. Margaret Pfanstiehl, the system allowed audiences with visual impairments to “watch” the film through a “reader,” who conveyed the action on screen in real time during pauses in the dialog.
       Despite positive reviews, the film fared poorly at the box office. A 1 Sep 1988 LAT article attributed the low attendance to its shared release date with director Martin Scorsese’s The Last Temptation of Christ (1988, see entry), a film that lured audiences with its controversial subject matter and protests.
       Tucker: The Man and His Dream was nominated for three Academy Awards, including Actor in a Supporting Role for Martin Landau, Art Direction, and Costume Design.

       The film begins with a mock newsreel about “Preston Tucker’s” life and inventions. At the end of the film, the following written statement appears onscreen: “Although only fifty Tuckers were ever produced, forty six of them are still road worthy and in use today. Tucker’s innovations of aerodynamic styling, padded dash, pop out windows, seat belts, fuel injections and disc brakes were slowly adopted by Detroit and are found in the cars you are driving now. Preston Tucker died of an illness six years after the trial, but his ideas will live forever.” The end credits also feature documentary photographs of Tucker, including images from the opening ceremony of his Chicago, IL, plant, his car, and his family. The following acknowledgements appear in the credits: “Our appreciation to the Tucker family for their encouragement; Special thanks to the Tucker Automobile Club of America.”


The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by a student at Oregon State University, with Jon Lewis as academic advisor.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
27 Aug 1979
p. 1, 3.
Daily Variety
21 Jul 1987.
---
Daily Variety
1 Aug 1988
p. 3, 17.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 1987
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Aug 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 1989
p. 3, 7, 15.
Los Angeles Times
12 Aug 1988
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
1 Sep 1988.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Jul 1990.
---
New York Times
12 Aug 1988
p. 8.
People
1 Jun 1987.
---
Premiere
Aug 1988.
---
San Francisco Chronicle
27 Jan 1990.
---
Variety
3 Aug 1988.
---
Variety
3 Aug 1988
p. 10.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Consultant
1st cam asst
1st cam asst
2d cam asst
2d cam asst
Still photog
2d grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Crane grip
Best boy
Consultant
Console op
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst film ed
2d asst film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Set des
Leadman
Paint foreman
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Key cost
Key cost
Asst to cost des
MUSIC
Mus comp & arr
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Addl mus
SOUND
Sd des
Asst sd des
Boom op
Cableperson
Supv re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Dial ed
A.D.R. ed
A.D.R. ed
FX ed
FX ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Eff man
Title des prod
Opticals by
and Company
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Asst makeup artist
Hairstylist
Asst hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Loc casting
Loc casting asst
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Prod coord
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to the prods
Asst to Mr. Coppola
Defensive coord
Unit pub
Electronic cinema staff
Electronic cinema staff
Transportation coord
Tech adv
Picture car coord
Catering services by
Dalmations provided by
Post prod services provided by
A division of Lucasfilm Ltd.
Loc equip provided by
Addl equip by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Rhythm Delivery," written and performed by Joe Jackson, courtesy of Tusken Music
"When Johnny Comes Marching Home," written by Patrick Gilmore, band arrangement by Mark Adler, courtesy of Tusken Music
"Song of India," written by Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov, arrangement by Bob Wilber, courtesy of Tusken Music.
SONGS
"Tucker Jingle," music by Carmine Coppola, lyrics by Arnold Schulman, courtesy of Tusken Music
"The Music Goes 'Round and 'Round," music by Edward Farley and Michael Riley, lyrics by "Red" Hodgson, courtesy of Chappell & Co., Inc.
"Tiger Rag," by Harry DeCosta, Edwin B. Edwards, D. James LaRocca, Anthony Sbarbaro and Larry Shields, performed by Joe Jackson, courtesy of SBK Feist Catalogue Inc.
+
SONGS
"Tucker Jingle," music by Carmine Coppola, lyrics by Arnold Schulman, courtesy of Tusken Music
"The Music Goes 'Round and 'Round," music by Edward Farley and Michael Riley, lyrics by "Red" Hodgson, courtesy of Chappell & Co., Inc.
"Tiger Rag," by Harry DeCosta, Edwin B. Edwards, D. James LaRocca, Anthony Sbarbaro and Larry Shields, performed by Joe Jackson, courtesy of SBK Feist Catalogue Inc.
"Tiger Rag," recorded by the Mills Brothers, courtesy of The Welk Record Group
"Let the Rest of the World Go By," written by Ernest R. Ball and J.K. Brennan, courtesy of Warner Brothers Music, a division of Warner Brothers, Inc.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
1988
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York opening: 12 August 1988
Production Date:
13 April--mid July 1987 in Northern CA
Copyright Claimant:
Lucasfilm, Ltd.
Copyright Date:
9 September 1988
Copyright Number:
PA382510
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Color by Technicolor®
Lenses/Prints
Filmed in Technovision; Produced and distributed on Eastman Film
Duration(in mins):
111
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29156
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1945 Ypsilanti, Michigan, inventor Preston Tucker returns to his home-based business, the Ypsilanti Machine and Tool Factory, in a car filled with one dozen Dalmatians. As his wife, Vera, his children, and his workers gather around, Tucker reveals a drawing of his latest invention, the “car of tomorrow, today.” He announces that in five years, his futuristic, rear-engine Tucker Torpedo will put the “Big Three” car companies in Detroit, Michigan, out of commission. After his family and staff dine together, Tucker discusses the vehicle’s designs with his workers Eddie and Jimmy as his investor, Abe Karatz, arrives from New York City. Despite Tucker’s enthusiasm, the businessman refuses to support the venture and leaves. Later, as his children order floats at an ice cream parlor, Tucker notices a magazine advertisement for prefabricated homes and decides to launch a publicity campaign. Within a week, Tucker is bombarded with orders for the Torpedo. Meanwhile, Abe meets investment banker Floyd Cerf. Although Abe reports that Tucker has built a working prototype of the Torpedo, Floyd warns that consumers must be convinced of the vehicle’s reliability and suggests that Tucker team with an established automotive executive from Detroit, Robert Bennington. Abe agrees to set up a factory while Floyd recruits Bennington. Back in Ypsilanti, Air Force pilot and automotive engineer Alex Tremulis solicits Tucker for work, explaining that the vehicle needs several alterations to make it aerodynamic, and Tucker hires the young man as the company’s sole designer. When Abe arrives to present three potential factory sites, Tucker selects a former Dodge plant in Chicago, Illinois, that features the world’s largest building ... +


In 1945 Ypsilanti, Michigan, inventor Preston Tucker returns to his home-based business, the Ypsilanti Machine and Tool Factory, in a car filled with one dozen Dalmatians. As his wife, Vera, his children, and his workers gather around, Tucker reveals a drawing of his latest invention, the “car of tomorrow, today.” He announces that in five years, his futuristic, rear-engine Tucker Torpedo will put the “Big Three” car companies in Detroit, Michigan, out of commission. After his family and staff dine together, Tucker discusses the vehicle’s designs with his workers Eddie and Jimmy as his investor, Abe Karatz, arrives from New York City. Despite Tucker’s enthusiasm, the businessman refuses to support the venture and leaves. Later, as his children order floats at an ice cream parlor, Tucker notices a magazine advertisement for prefabricated homes and decides to launch a publicity campaign. Within a week, Tucker is bombarded with orders for the Torpedo. Meanwhile, Abe meets investment banker Floyd Cerf. Although Abe reports that Tucker has built a working prototype of the Torpedo, Floyd warns that consumers must be convinced of the vehicle’s reliability and suggests that Tucker team with an established automotive executive from Detroit, Robert Bennington. Abe agrees to set up a factory while Floyd recruits Bennington. Back in Ypsilanti, Air Force pilot and automotive engineer Alex Tremulis solicits Tucker for work, explaining that the vehicle needs several alterations to make it aerodynamic, and Tucker hires the young man as the company’s sole designer. When Abe arrives to present three potential factory sites, Tucker selects a former Dodge plant in Chicago, Illinois, that features the world’s largest building under one roof. However, Abe warns they must get permission from the United States War Assets Administration to acquire the plant because the government uses it to build B-29 airplanes. At a luncheon in Washington, D.C., Tucker intentionally serves raw steaks to administration officials while exhibiting a slide show of bloodied car crash victims. As the men grow queasy and excuse themselves from the table, Tucker explains that the Torpedo is much safer than the vehicles produced by the Big Three and accuses the automobile industry of criminal negligence. Although Abe is convinced they will not get the factory, committee member Oscar Beasley informs the men that the plant is theirs under the condition that they have assets of $15 million and manufacture at least fifty cars in one year. When Abe arranges with a press agent for the Torpedo prototype to be exhibited in New York City with great fanfare, he is horrified to discover that Tucker does not have the car or the money to build it. Back at the Tucker home, Abe is further discouraged by Tucker’s estimate that the prototype will cost $50,000. Writing a personal check for $6,000, Abe insists that Tucker’s team fabricate a Torpedo in the sixty days before they take possession of the Chicago plant. Undaunted by the challenge, Tucker starts construction the next day at a junkyard, pulling an old Packard from the pile to use as a frame. Meanwhile, Abe raises money by obtaining advances from potential dealers. With less than a week to meet his deadline, Tucker convenes with Bennington and his board of directors to complain about the shortage of clay and steel in Detroit, then takes the problem to Michigan Senator Ferguson. However, Ferguson is unwilling to help and warns Tucker to stay out of the car business. Returning home, Tucker grows discouraged and Alex is nearly killed while working on the car, but the team perseveres. At the opening day celebration of the Chicago plant, Tucker stalls the impatient crowd while his crew works out the final kinks in the prototype backstage. Meanwhile, an automobile industry insider notes the car’s shortcomings, bribes a security guard to be an informant, and calls Senator Ferguson with his report. When the Torpedo appears onstage, the crowd cheers and Tucker acknowledges his family and crew. As Tucker takes the car on a publicity tour, Bennington infiltrates the plant with personnel who redesign the car, taking away its safety features and moving its engine to the front. When Vera reports the news to Tucker, he returns to Chicago to protest, but Abe implores him to go along with Bennington’s demands. Later, Tucker is summoned to a meeting with tycoon Howard Hughes, who tips him off to a helicopter engine company which is overstocked with steel and looking for a bail out from their financial woes. Back in Ypsilanti, Tucker instructs his team to secretly convert an air-cooled helicopter engine from the failing company into a water-cooled automobile engine and soon they have a viable rear engine for the Torpedo. As the car successfully completes a twenty-four hour road test, Senator Ferguson’s informant reports that Tucker is a threat. Sometime later, Abe warns Tucker that the plant is wired with surveillance devices and the Big Three are set on destroying his business. Resigning from his post, Abe confesses that he spent three years in prison for bank fraud and wants to avoid exposure. As he walks away, Abe instructs Tucker to listen to a radio show the following evening. With his family and crew gathered around the tuner, Tucker hears an announcement that the Securities and Exchange Commission (S.E.C.) has deemed his enterprise a fraud and Senator Ferguson is spearheading a probe into his finances. Back at the plant, Eddie reminds Tucker that they are only three cars short of meeting the fifty-car quota stipulated in the War Assets Administration contract. The crew agrees to work for free to build the remaining cars so they can keep the factory. Tucker then receives a call from Abe, who warns that the police are waiting to arrest him and reporters are swarming the police station for his arrival. Using the opportunity for publicity, Tucker guides the officers on a high-speed car chase in his Torpedo to the police station. There, he announces to the press that the chase proves the Torpedo’s road-worthiness. Later, Tucker goes to trial facing 155 years in prison for fraud and S.E.C. violations. The government argues that Tucker built his car from junkyard refuse and deceived Americans for financial gain. Meanwhile, Tucker’s crew labors to complete the three remaining Torpedoes. When the last car is finished, Tucker instructs his crew to park the fleet in front of the courthouse. The next day, as Tucker waits for the vehicles to arrive, Vera reads a newspaper headline: Senator Ferguson ordered the War Assets Commission to evict Tucker from the factory. Inside the courthouse, Tucker delivers his own final statement. Although he implores the jury to look outside at the fifty cars he manufactured, his request is thwarted by the prosecution. When Tucker argues that the American Dream has been squandered by big business, the jury finds him not guilty and the courtroom erupts in applause. Outside, Abe observes how well people respond to the Torpedoes and laments that only fifty were made. However, Tucker insists that his dream survives despite the death of his company and drives away with his family in the fleet of Torpedoes. +

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Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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