Honey, I Blew Up the Kid (1992)

PG | 89 mins | Adventure, Comedy | 17 July 1992

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HISTORY

The 12 Nov 1990 Var announced that former Columbia Pictures president Dawn Steel would make her feature film producing debut on the untitled sequel to Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (1989, see entry).
       An article in the 9 Apr 1991 DV reported that the film experienced several delays, and director Jeremiah Chechik would be replaced by Randal Kleiser. Conflicting reports regarding Chechik’s departure from the film included “creative differences” over the script, which had undergone a number of rewrites and was a contributing factor to the production’s delay. Other sources claimed Walt Disney Pictures, Inc. was concerned with Chechik’s minimal experience with special effects. And “Disney insiders” noted that Chechik left the project to direct Blue Maaga, which was released as Cool Runnings (1993, see entry).
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, principal photography began 17 Jun 1991 in Simi Valley, CA. Other locations included downtown Las Vegas, NV, and the Walt Disney Pictures studio lot in Burbank, CA. The 12 Jul 1991 DV noted the film, now titled Honey, I Blew Up the Baby, was budgeted at $32 million.
       An article in the 12 Jul 1992 NYT reported that the filmmakers encountered some difficulty when first working with the toddler twins, Daniel and Joshua Shalikar. The two-year-old children were “undirectable” and unpredictable. Realizing that “kids will be kids,” Kleiser shot footage of the children, and worked with their actions, rather than forcing the boys to exactly follow the script. Rick Moranis was highly experienced with improvisational acting, which proved to be an ... More Less

The 12 Nov 1990 Var announced that former Columbia Pictures president Dawn Steel would make her feature film producing debut on the untitled sequel to Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (1989, see entry).
       An article in the 9 Apr 1991 DV reported that the film experienced several delays, and director Jeremiah Chechik would be replaced by Randal Kleiser. Conflicting reports regarding Chechik’s departure from the film included “creative differences” over the script, which had undergone a number of rewrites and was a contributing factor to the production’s delay. Other sources claimed Walt Disney Pictures, Inc. was concerned with Chechik’s minimal experience with special effects. And “Disney insiders” noted that Chechik left the project to direct Blue Maaga, which was released as Cool Runnings (1993, see entry).
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, principal photography began 17 Jun 1991 in Simi Valley, CA. Other locations included downtown Las Vegas, NV, and the Walt Disney Pictures studio lot in Burbank, CA. The 12 Jul 1991 DV noted the film, now titled Honey, I Blew Up the Baby, was budgeted at $32 million.
       An article in the 12 Jul 1992 NYT reported that the filmmakers encountered some difficulty when first working with the toddler twins, Daniel and Joshua Shalikar. The two-year-old children were “undirectable” and unpredictable. Realizing that “kids will be kids,” Kleiser shot footage of the children, and worked with their actions, rather than forcing the boys to exactly follow the script. Rick Moranis was highly experienced with improvisational acting, which proved to be an asset while working with the toddlers. The children’s entourage included their father and a psychologist who specialized in children’s onstage behavior. One trick suggested by the psychologist was to pretend it was someone’s birthday whenever the boys were present because they would be more willing to work if there was a party. The twins began to “mature” during the shoot, and by the last month of filming, were able to “take major scene direction.”
       Approximately $8 million of the budget was spent on special and visual effects. According to an article in the 9 Jun 1992 HR, there were two scenes in the film, now titled Honey, I Blew Up the Kid, that required the “dramatic effects” of computer graphics. A two-person graphic effects company comprised of Randal Kleiser’s brother, Jeff Kleiser, and his partner, Diana Walczak, was hired to do the work.
       Articles in the 21 Oct 1993 and 13 Nov 1993 LAT and 13 Jan 1994 HR reported that game-show producer Paul Alter filed a lawsuit against the Walt Disney Company. Alter alleged that he submitted a twelve-page film treatment titled Now, That’s A Baby to Disney in 1980, which Disney rejected but later used as the basis for Honey, I Blew Up the Kid. The jury ordered Disney to pay Alter $300,000. Alter’s attorney, Tom Girardi, speculated that the jurors may have been influenced by something that did not make it into the film. In Alter’s treatment, the baby grew to a giant size due to a genetic accident. In the film, the baby’s growth is accelerated by a machine. However, the jurors were presented with earlier drafts of the screenplay, which included a version that attributed the baby’s growth to a genetic accident. A Disney spokesperson noted the studio was “disappointed and troubled by the verdict.” Disney planned to file a motion for a new trial, but reached a confidential settlement with Alter in Jan 1994.
       The film marked the feature film debut of actress Keri Russell. End credits misspell the word “Marshal” for the characters named “Marshall Brooks” and “Federal Marshall.”
       End credits include the following acknowledgments: “Special recognition to Kit Reed for 'The Attack Of The Giant Baby' and “The filmmakers wish to thank: Nevada Motion Picture Division, Director Bob Hirsch; Las Vegas Downtown Progress Association, Executive Director Bill Briare; Hertz-Penske.” End credits also note that “portions of this film were photographed at Disney-MGM Studios, Orlando, Florida.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Apr 1991
p. 1, 19.
Daily Variety
12 Jul 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jun 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 1992
p. 10, 16.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jan 1994.
---
Los Angeles Times
17 Jul 1992
Calendar, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
21 Oct 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
13 Nov 1993.
---
New York Times
12 Jul 1992
p. 11, 16.
New York Times
17 Jul 1992
p. 6.
Variety
12 Nov 1990.
---
Variety
20 Jul 1992
p. 63.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Walt Disney Pictures presents
in association with Touchwood Pacific Partners I
an Edward S. Feldman production
a Randal Kleiser film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Co-exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Best boy elec
Best boy elec
Elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Video assist
Video assist
Dir of photog, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
Still photog
Moviecam® cam and lenses provided by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Visual eff illustrator
Storyboard illustrator
Storyboard illustrator
Storyboard illustrator
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Addl film ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Post prod supv
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Asst set dec
Leadperson
Swing gang
Miniatures set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Lead set des
Set des
Set des
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Standby painter
Greensman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's cost supv
Women's cost supv
Set costumer
Set costumer
MUSIC
Mus editing
Mus scoring mixer
Orchs
Mus contractor
Supv copyist
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Cableperson
Sd editing services
Sd des and supv sd ed
Sd des and supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Spec sd eff
Spec sd eff
Spec sd eff
Spec sd eff
Foley artist
Foley artist
ADR group coord
ADR mixer
ADR/Foley mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Dubbing rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff prod
Visual eff ed
Asst visual eff ed
Mechanical eff by
Des/Coord, Image Special Effects Co.
Spec eff supv
Spec eff supv
Spec eff supv
Spec eff supv
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Prod eff liaison
Visuel eff unit dir, Visual eff unit
Visual eff coord, Visual eff unit
Dir of photog, Visual eff unit
Prod supv, Visual eff unit
Post photog supv, Visual eff unit
1st asst dir, Visual eff unit
2d asst dir, Visual eff unit
Spec makeup/Eff coord, Visual eff unit
1st asst cam, Visual eff unit
2d asst cam, Visual eff unit
Scr supv, Visual eff unit
Addl visual eff editing, Visual eff unit
Gaffer, Visual eff unit
Best boy elec, Visual eff unit
Best boy elec, Visual eff unit
Key grip, Visual eff unit
Best boy grip, Visual eff unit
Prop master, Visual eff unit
Unit accountant, Visual eff unit
Sd mixer, Visual eff unit
Craft service, Visual eff unit
Video playback, Visual eff unit
Prod asst, Visual eff unit
Prod asst, Visual eff unit
Prod asst, Visual eff unit
Prod asst, Visual eff unit
Prod asst, Visual eff unit
Prod asst, Visual eff unit
Visual eff supv, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Visual eff prod, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Co-visual eff supv, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Co-visual eff supv, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Eff anim supv, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Eff cam supv, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Visual eff coord, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Opt cam, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Opt cam, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Opt cam, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Opt cam, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Opt line-up, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Opt line-up, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Opt line-up, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Opt line-up, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Stage and matte cam, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Stage and matte cam, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Eff anim, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Eff anim, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Eff anim, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Eff anim, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Eff anim, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Eff anim, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Eff anim, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Eff anim cam, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Laboratory tech, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Laboratory tech, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Laboratory tech, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Laboratory tech, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Laboratory tech, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Laboratory tech, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Eff graphics, Buena Vista Visual Effects
Visual eff supv, Available Light Ltd.
Optical supv, Available Light Ltd.
Available Light Ltd.
Available Light Ltd.
Available Light Ltd.
Available Light Ltd.
Available Light Ltd.
Available Light Ltd.
Visual eff supv, Perpetual Motion Pictures
Opt eff supv, Perpetual Motion Pictures
Prod mgr, Perpetual Motion Pictures
Perpetual Motion Pictures
Perpetual Motion Pictures
Perpetual Motion Pictures
Perpetual Motion Pictures
Perpetual Motion Pictures
Perpetual Motion Pictures
Perpetual Motion Pictures
Perpetual Motion Pictures
Perpetual Motion Pictures
Perpetual Motion Pictures
Visual eff
The Chandler Group
The Chandler Group
The Chandler Group
The Chandler Group
The Chandler Group
The Chandler Group
4-Ward Productions
4-Ward Productions
4-Ward Productions
Computer generated imagery by
Electronic compositing by
Addl composites by
Addl composites by
Process compositing by
Miniature supv, Stetson Visual Services, Inc.
Miniature supv, Stetson Visual Services, Inc.
Prod coord, Stetson Visual Services, Inc.
Modelmakers, Stetson Visual Services, Inc.
Modelmakers, Stetson Visual Services, Inc.
Modelmakers, Stetson Visual Services, Inc.
Modelmakers, Stetson Visual Services, Inc.
Addl miniature and scale perspective eff
Addl miniature and scale perspective eff
Addl miniature and scale perspective eff
Addl miniature and scale perspective eff
Puppet/Makeup eff by
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Puppet/Makeup eff by, Kevin Yagher Productions
Video originated imagery
Video originated imagery, Virtue Creative Services
Video originated imagery, Virtue Creative Services
Video originated imagery
Video originated imagery, Hill Production Services
Video originated imagery
Video originated imagery, Anti Gravity Workshop
Title des
Titles & opticals
MAKEUP
Baby Adam spec makeup eff by
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Prod secy
Loc mgr
Las Vegas loc mgr
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst to Mr. Feldman
Asst to Mr. Kleiser
Asst to Mr. Jones
Asst to Mr. Smith
Unit pub
Baby wrangler
Baby wrangler
Baby wrangler
Studio teacher
Studio teacher
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Animal trainer
Asst animal trainer
Craft service
Las Vegas extras
Los Angeles extras
ANIMATION
Anim opening conceived by
Anim opening conceived by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Prod and distributed on
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Stuart Gordon, Brian Yuzna, & Ed Naha.
SONGS
“Loco-Motion,” written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King
“Kids Wanna Rock,” written by Bryan Adams and Jim Vallance, performed by Bryan Adams, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
“Stayin’ Alive,” written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb, performed by The Bee Gees, courtesy of Polygram Special Products, a division of Polygram Group Distribution, Inc.
+
SONGS
“Loco-Motion,” written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King
“Kids Wanna Rock,” written by Bryan Adams and Jim Vallance, performed by Bryan Adams, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
“Stayin’ Alive,” written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb, performed by The Bee Gees, courtesy of Polygram Special Products, a division of Polygram Group Distribution, Inc.
“The Hokey Pokey,” written by Larry La Price, Charles Macak and Tafft Baker, performed by Peter Renaday
“Ours If We Want It,” written by Tom Snow and Mark Mueller, courtesy of Snow Music
“You’re Growing,” written and performed by Fred M. Rogers, courtesy of Family Communications, Inc.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Honey, I Blew Up the Baby
Release Date:
17 July 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 17 July 1992
Production Date:
began 17 June 1991
Copyright Claimant:
The Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
21 July 1992
Copyright Number:
PA575002
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral recording Dolby Stereo SR™ in selected theatres
Color
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
89
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31854
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Inventor Wayne Szalinski developed a machine that could shrink matter, and accidentally shrunk his older children, Amy and Nick. Fortunately, he was able to reverse the problem. A few years later, Clifford Sterling, owner of Sterling Laboratories, hired Wayne to develop a machine to enlarge matter. Wayne and his wife, Diane, moved their family, which now includes two-year-old-toddler, Adam, to Vista Del Mar, Nevada, where Wayne works under the supervision of Dr. Hendrickson, who has little use for the inventor. Amy leaves for college and Diane goes to help her move into the dorm. Diane is anxious about leaving Wayne alone with Nick and Adam, but he is certain he can handle it. Wayne arrives late at work and discovers that Hendrickson ran an experiment without him. The laser blew up, and Hendrickson is furious at their consistent failure to reverse Wayne’s original experiment. Wayne has been working on the problem, but Hendrickson rebuffs him, insisting that true scientists are working on it. Nick Szalinski has a crush on a classmate named Mandy and wants to ask her out, but is nervous. He works after school at a local water park, where he sees Mandy and her friends. When Nick finishes work, he approaches Mandy, but Wayne arrives to pick his son up, and Mandy’s friends laugh at his van, which is loaded with inventions. At home, Wayne puts Adam down for a nap, singing to him until he falls asleep. As Wayne stares at a balloon in the room, he comes up with a potential solution for the experiment. He telephones Hendrickson, who refuses ... +


Inventor Wayne Szalinski developed a machine that could shrink matter, and accidentally shrunk his older children, Amy and Nick. Fortunately, he was able to reverse the problem. A few years later, Clifford Sterling, owner of Sterling Laboratories, hired Wayne to develop a machine to enlarge matter. Wayne and his wife, Diane, moved their family, which now includes two-year-old-toddler, Adam, to Vista Del Mar, Nevada, where Wayne works under the supervision of Dr. Hendrickson, who has little use for the inventor. Amy leaves for college and Diane goes to help her move into the dorm. Diane is anxious about leaving Wayne alone with Nick and Adam, but he is certain he can handle it. Wayne arrives late at work and discovers that Hendrickson ran an experiment without him. The laser blew up, and Hendrickson is furious at their consistent failure to reverse Wayne’s original experiment. Wayne has been working on the problem, but Hendrickson rebuffs him, insisting that true scientists are working on it. Nick Szalinski has a crush on a classmate named Mandy and wants to ask her out, but is nervous. He works after school at a local water park, where he sees Mandy and her friends. When Nick finishes work, he approaches Mandy, but Wayne arrives to pick his son up, and Mandy’s friends laugh at his van, which is loaded with inventions. At home, Wayne puts Adam down for a nap, singing to him until he falls asleep. As Wayne stares at a balloon in the room, he comes up with a potential solution for the experiment. He telephones Hendrickson, who refuses to listen and tells Wayne to have a good weekend. Hendrickson hangs up, and turns back to meet with a company board member, Terence Wheeler, as they scheme to wrest control from Clifford Sterling. Wayne is too excited about his idea to wait all weekend, and takes Nick and Adam to the laboratory. The security guard is surprised to see Wayne on the weekend, and alerts Hendrickson. Wayne leaves Adam and his stuffed bunny in the stroller while he and Nick work. Wayne insists they must lower the intensity on the laser, so he smashes a soda bottle and uses the glass bottom to adjust the lens. He borrows Adam’s bunny to use as a target, then he and Nick turn to the computer. They do not notice as Adam runs to his bunny and gets hit by the laser before returning to the stroller. Wayne examines the bunny, which seems unaffected. Disappointed that his idea did not work, Wayne and the children leave the building. When they return home, Wayne suggests that he and Nick go to a movie together. Wayne calls Mandy, who agrees to babysit that afternoon. Wayne puts food in the microwave for Adam, and the electromagnetic flux of the microwave causes Adam and his bunny to glow and then grow. As Adam becomes seven feet tall, Wayne realizes he was struck by the laser, and they must return to the laboratory to reverse the process. They purchase clothes and a hat to disguise Adam as a man, and rush past the guard. Wayne sees Hendrickson inside the lab and tells Nick to hide Adam in the hallway. Hendrickson declares that the power surge caused by Wayne’s unauthorized experiment destroyed the database. He fires Wayne and orders him to leave. As they drive home, Nick wonders why his father did not tell Hendrickson that the experiment worked. Wayne does not want Adam to undergo tests and experimentation, which was the reason he kept quiet when he shrunk Nick and Amy years before. Wayne wants to fix Adam before Diane returns home, but she is waiting when they arrive, and faints upon seeing the towering toddler. Inside, as Adam plays, he wrecks the house, and neighbors are disturbed by the sounds of destruction. Wayne states that his original invention, which shrunk the kids, is in the Sterling warehouse. He wants to sneak into the warehouse with Diane, retrieve the machine, and use it to shrink Adam. Wayne sings Adam to sleep, and they leave Nick to watch him while they rush to the warehouse. Meanwhile, lab technicians resurrect computer images from Wayne’s experiment. Hendrickson recognizes Adam, and heads for Wayne’s house. As Diane and Wayne search the warehouse for Wayne’s machine, he remembers that he hired Mandy to babysit. Nick is surprised when Mandy arrives, and tells her they do not need a babysitter. However, she forces her way inside, sees Adam, and faints. When she regains consciousness, Nick explains the situation. As Adam dances to a television show, electricity from the television instigates another growth spurt. Nick and Mandy chase Adam as he wreaks havoc, destroying cars, street lights, and hydrants. Hendrickson arrives, sees the chaos and calls for Federal marshals. As Diane and Wayne race back home with the machine, they are pursued by two motorcycle officers. Wayne fires the machine and the officers shrink. Wayne fires again, returning the confused officers to normal size, and they decide not to pursue the speeding van. Diane and Wayne return home to find Hendrickson and Federal marshals. Marshal Brooks promises their children are being transported to safety. Meanwhile, Nick, Mandy, and Adam are traveling in a semi-truck, and as they drive by power lines, the electromagnetic flux causes Adam to grow to fifty feet tall. He believes Nick and Mandy are little toys, tucks them in his overall bib pocket, and escapes. Back at the house, Hendrickson declares Adam will require immediate testing, and also demands that Wayne and Diane be arrested. However, Clifford Sterling arrives, and fires Hendrickson. When they learn that Adam is walking toward Las Vegas, they grab Wayne’s machine and rush to stop him. Adam must stand in front of the laser for 12.2 seconds, but corralling him for that long proves difficult. They send a helicopter to pick up the bunny, which has also grown to huge proportions. Sterling mans the laser while Wayne climbs on the bunny and flies toward Adam. Wayne sings his son to sleep, and as Adam closes his eyes, Wayne mentions the word “nap.” Adam, who hates naps, gets up and pushes the bunny away. Wayne falls into Adam’s overalls, slides to the ground, and dives out of the way as Adam walks toward the neon lights of Vegas. Meanwhile, Hendrickson conspires with Terence Wheeler, gets a huge tranquilizer gun, and forces local militia to fly him to Adam. Adam walks through downtown Las Vegas, growing to more than one hundred feet in height as the city lights accelerate his growth. Nick and Mandy pull a thread from the bottom of Adam’s pocket, using it as a rope to climb down to the street. They get into a convertible, which Adam picks up and pockets. Knowing that Adam likes ice cream trucks, Marshal Brooks drives one rigged with a loudspeaker to lure Adam out of downtown. Diane declares that Adam will not sit still unless she holds him. She tells Wayne to use his machine to make her grow so she can hold Adam, then Wayne can shrink them both. Wayne is hesitant, but sees Hendrickson flying toward Adam. He breaks a soda bottle, uses it to adjust his machine, and lasers Diane. A gigantic Diane stops Hendrickson, and then gets her son. Wayne fires his machine, and successfully shrinks Diane and Adam. As they celebrate, Wayne realizes they also shrunk Nick and Mandy. When Wayne discovers the miniature teens, they are kissing. Nick waves his father off, and Wayne lets them have a few moments before returning them to normal. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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