Little Noises (1992)

80 or 110 mins | Comedy-drama | 24 April 1992

Full page view
HISTORY

On 24 May 1989, HR indicated that Little Noises would be one of Monument Films’ first pictures to go before cameras. Nearly a year later, a 14 Mar 1990 DV news brief indicated that principal photography would begin 7 May 1990. A 20 Mar 1990 HR article revealed that Monument had already sold domestic home video rights to Prism Entertainment. The deal would purportedly finance production. Although HR cited a budget of $3 million, an Apr 1992 review in the LA Weekly stated that the film was made for a mere $1.3 million. Principal photography began 21 Jun 1990 in Queens, NY, according to a 26 Jun 1990 HR production chart. A 19 Jun 1990 HR news brief anticipated a six-week shoot, and the 13 Aug 1990 HR confirmed that production had wrapped. Producers expected the picture to be acquired for distribution and in theaters within the first three months of 1991.
       The 110-minute picture received its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival on 19 Jan 1991. A 21 Jan 1991 DV review commended the score and the cinematography, but found fault with the ambling story, suggesting that a “more rigorous development process” might have strengthened writer-director Jane Spencer’s feature debut. Over the next year, filmmakers struggled to find a distributor, as recounted in a 13 Apr 1992 HR article. Producer Michael Spielberg admitted that his decision to pre-sell the home video rights became “a strike against … generating theatrical interest.” Eventually, he approached Prism Entertainment and convinced the home video distributor to support the film’s ... More Less

On 24 May 1989, HR indicated that Little Noises would be one of Monument Films’ first pictures to go before cameras. Nearly a year later, a 14 Mar 1990 DV news brief indicated that principal photography would begin 7 May 1990. A 20 Mar 1990 HR article revealed that Monument had already sold domestic home video rights to Prism Entertainment. The deal would purportedly finance production. Although HR cited a budget of $3 million, an Apr 1992 review in the LA Weekly stated that the film was made for a mere $1.3 million. Principal photography began 21 Jun 1990 in Queens, NY, according to a 26 Jun 1990 HR production chart. A 19 Jun 1990 HR news brief anticipated a six-week shoot, and the 13 Aug 1990 HR confirmed that production had wrapped. Producers expected the picture to be acquired for distribution and in theaters within the first three months of 1991.
       The 110-minute picture received its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival on 19 Jan 1991. A 21 Jan 1991 DV review commended the score and the cinematography, but found fault with the ambling story, suggesting that a “more rigorous development process” might have strengthened writer-director Jane Spencer’s feature debut. Over the next year, filmmakers struggled to find a distributor, as recounted in a 13 Apr 1992 HR article. Producer Michael Spielberg admitted that his decision to pre-sell the home video rights became “a strike against … generating theatrical interest.” Eventually, he approached Prism Entertainment and convinced the home video distributor to support the film’s theatrical release. Little Noises was released 24 Apr 1992. HR also noted that, in the year following the Sundance screening, revisions had been made to the movie. Reviews in the LAT and NYT indicated a total running time of eighty minutes, thirty minutes shorter than the version screened at Sundance.
       Various pieces of music by French composer Claude Debussy (1862 – 1918) can be heard throughout the movie. However, end credits do not list any licensed music compositions.
       End credits include the following acknowledgments: “Special thanks: Steve Ransohoff; Mickey Mayerson & Steve Saltzman; Art Stribley & Lew Horwitz; The Lewis Horwitz Organization; Elio Pesato—Technicolor, NY; Conrad Pollack—Pollack & Pollack; Barry Collier & Barbara Javitz; Merv Kolb—Horowitz, Kolb, & Zaron; Mary Lou Ventrelli—Chemical Bank; David Seinfeld & Rosalyne Smith; Richard Appelbaum; Ira Schreck; Irene Romero; Natalie Chandler; Caroline Botsford; Sandra Schulberg; The Set Dressing Shop; Innercity Fish Supply Company; Arenson Office Furnishings; Candle Business Systems; Macmillan Publishing Company; Variety/A Cahners Publication; Interview Magazine; Advertising in Movies; Unique Product Placement; The Coca-Cola Company; Brian Dube, Inc. NYC; Uplift Lighting; Eclectic Encore; PM Promotions; Travel Hut; Ristorante Barolo; Studio La Rue, NY; Craft Caravan, Inc.; Ron Gilbert; Morris Spielberg; Iris Lord; Shelly Hunter; Mrs. Mary Kligman; Mr. R.J. Balzano; City of Hoboken, New Jersey; Lt. Anthony Falco—Hoboken Police Department; New York Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre & Broadcasting, Jaynne C. Keyes, Director; New York City Police Department; New York State Governor’s Office for Motion Picture and Television Development; Gateway National Recreation Area, Staten Island Division; Jaguar XJ/S-C provided by Rallye Motors, Paramus, New Jersey; Backstage Magazine used with permission from BPI Communications, Inc.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Mar 1990
p. 3.
Daily Variety
21 Jan 1991
p. 13, 35.
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Mar 1990
p. 3, 78.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jun 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 1992.
---
LA Weekly
24 Apr - 1 May 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
24 Apr 1992
Calendar, p. 13.
New York Times
24 Apr 1992
Section C, p. 8.
Reader
1 May 1992.
---
Variety
4 Feb 1991
pp. 90-91.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Monument Pictures Presents
In Association with Prism Entertainment
Presented in Association with Henry Jaglom and The Women's Film Company
DISTRIBUTION COMPANIES
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Line prod
WRITERS
Scr/Story
Addl material
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Cam intern
Still photog
Prop still photog
Gaffer
Best boy
3rd elec
4th elec
Key grip
2d grip
3rd grip
4th grip
Cam rentals
Grip and elec rentals
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept asst
Art dept asst
Art dept intern
FILM EDITORS
Post prod supv/Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
Dailies adv
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
2d props
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Carpenter
Prop asst
COSTUMES
Cost des
Assoc cost des
Cost intern
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus comp
Mus ed
Addl mus composed by
Addl mus composed by
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
Musician
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed/Re-rec eng
Sd eff
ADR ed & Foley artist
Foley eng
Re-rec eng
Post audio ed
Post audio coord
Re-rec facility
Soundtrack rec/Mixer
Rec asst
Soundtrack prod coord
Soundtrack rec studio
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Hair and makeup des
Asst hair and makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Scr cont
Unit mgr
Loc mgr
Loc asst
Unit asst
Prod auditor
Asst auditor
Office prod asst
Unit pub
Transportation capt
Driver
Asst to the producers
Asst to the dir
Casting assoc
Extras casting dir
Craft services
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Payroll services provided by
Prod accounting software
Completion bond provided by
Legal services provided by
Insurance provided by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Hart Crane's poetry used by permission of Liveright Publishing Company: "The Complete Poems and Selected Letters and Prose of Hart Crane," copyright 1946, Liveright Publishing Compny.
AUTHOR
SONGS
Additional music performed by The Ordinaires
The Ordinaires appear courtesy of Bar None Records.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 April 1992
Premiere Information:
World premiere at Sundance Film Festival: 19 January 1991
Los Angeles and New York openings: 24 April 1992
Production Date:
21 June--early August 1990
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
80 or 110
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In a dingy apartment in one of the outer boroughs of New York City, aspiring writer Joey Kremple fends off interruptions from his friend, Timmy Smith, and neighbor, Delores. Timmy, an actor, declares that he must move in for a while. Joey protests, claiming he needs peace and quiet to work on his great American novel, but Delores points to the blank paper in the typewriter and laughs, mocking him. Later, Joey works a shift at a cosmetics boutique. However, the job is a ruse to get close to salesgirl, Stella Winslow, who is also a playwright. Joey asks about her recent recognition from a New York writer’s theater, but Stella dismisses his query. Frustrated, Joey quits. He goes to a nearby diner and finds Timmy in the midst of an impromptu musical theater audition for literary agent, Mathias Liechstenstein. Joey begins reciting some prose, prompting Mathias to ask if he is the author. Joey confesses he borrowed the lines from someone else, before asking Mathias for a loan. The agent storms out of the diner in disbelief. Joey and Timmy follow, attempting to convince him that someday, they will be famous, and he should invest in them while he can. They see Stella Winslow walking home from work, and Joey abandons Timmy and Mathias to join her. After making small talk, he asks her out on a date, and Stella agrees to meet him for lunch on Saturday. In the park a few days later, Joey’s deaf-mute friend, Marty Slovack, approaches and shyly offers Joey a book of original poetry. Joey is skeptical of Marty’s aptitude for writing, but Marty insists Joey incorporate the poems into his “great ... +


In a dingy apartment in one of the outer boroughs of New York City, aspiring writer Joey Kremple fends off interruptions from his friend, Timmy Smith, and neighbor, Delores. Timmy, an actor, declares that he must move in for a while. Joey protests, claiming he needs peace and quiet to work on his great American novel, but Delores points to the blank paper in the typewriter and laughs, mocking him. Later, Joey works a shift at a cosmetics boutique. However, the job is a ruse to get close to salesgirl, Stella Winslow, who is also a playwright. Joey asks about her recent recognition from a New York writer’s theater, but Stella dismisses his query. Frustrated, Joey quits. He goes to a nearby diner and finds Timmy in the midst of an impromptu musical theater audition for literary agent, Mathias Liechstenstein. Joey begins reciting some prose, prompting Mathias to ask if he is the author. Joey confesses he borrowed the lines from someone else, before asking Mathias for a loan. The agent storms out of the diner in disbelief. Joey and Timmy follow, attempting to convince him that someday, they will be famous, and he should invest in them while he can. They see Stella Winslow walking home from work, and Joey abandons Timmy and Mathias to join her. After making small talk, he asks her out on a date, and Stella agrees to meet him for lunch on Saturday. In the park a few days later, Joey’s deaf-mute friend, Marty Slovack, approaches and shyly offers Joey a book of original poetry. Joey is skeptical of Marty’s aptitude for writing, but Marty insists Joey incorporate the poems into his “great American novel.” The deaf-mute holds out an old photograph of a young woman, indicating that she is his inspiration. Joey returns to his apartment and daydreams about kissing Stella. His reverie is interrupted by a knock on the door from his landlord, Aunt Shirley. She demands payment for the rent, and is exasperated when all he can come up with is five dollars. The next day, Timmy and Joey follow Mathias Liechstenstein through the neighborhood to a nearby newsstand, where Mathias meets writer Elliot Ardsley. Joey and Timmy introduce themselves to the successful author, who is flattered by their interest. Mathias, however, scowls in annoyance. On Saturday, Stella and Joey walk along the docks in the rain. Stella shares the news that her play will be produced in England. Realizing she intends to move away, Joey grows despondent. When Stella asks if he is really writing a novel, Joey insists he is nearly finished with the book, and promises to show it to her the following week. That night, with Timmy loudly rehearsing lines for an upcoming audition, Joey struggles to begin writing. In the morning, Aunt Shirley declares he must pay the rent within twenty-four hours. Joey informs her that he is on his way to a meeting that will resolve his financial difficulties. He goes to an elegant restaurant and shows Elliot Ardsley the synopsis for his novel, which is about nomadic tribes in the Antarctic. Elliot points out that the premise is factually inaccurate. Afterwards, Joey goes to a park and reassures himself that his ideas are interesting. Marty shows up with a new sheaf of poetry, which he presents to Joey. The writer becomes engrossed in reading the poems, and Marty runs away. Joey returns home to find Timmy watching television. The two argue about their living arrangement, and their neighbor, Delores, barges in and attempts to break up the quarrel, to no avail. The commotion draws the attention of Aunt Shirley and Uncle Howard, who throw Timmy and Joey out onto the street. Walking through the neighborhood, they see Elliot Ardsley’s new novel prominently displayed in a bookshop window. Timmy finds a magazine article on the sidewalk, and reads about Elliot’s next project, a collection of stories based on real-life artists who are blind to their lack of talent. Joey storms off, furious. The next day, he takes Marty’s poems to Mathias Liechstenstein and passes them off as his own. The agent gives Joey an advance and arranges accommodations for him. Later, Joey attends a party at Stella’s apartment, surprised to see Timmy there in a wheelchair. The actor, whose feet were crushed in a taxi accident, accuses Joey of ignoring him. Joey offers Timmy some cash, before joining Mathias and Elliot for a glass of wine. When Elliot asks about the deeper meaning of Joey’s poems, Joey becomes tongue-tied and leaves. Stella follows, voicing her suspicion that he plagiarized the work. He silences her with a kiss, and she walks away in disgust. Sometime later, after achieving a measure of success, Joey walks down a street in Manhattan wearing a suit and tie. He notices a homeless person on the sidewalk and pauses, as if in recognition. When he arrives at his lunch meeting with Mathias and Elliot, Joey asks whatever happened to Marty Slovack? Mathias reports that Stu Slovak, Marty’s brother, was killed in a drug incident, and that Marty disappeared shortly thereafter. Joey abruptly excuses himself. After finding Marty curled up on a stoop in an alleyway, he offers him some cash. Joey remarks that Marty’s poetry is of exceptional merit and worthy of publication. However, he does not admit that he took credit for the poems. Racked with guilt, Joey turns and walks away, remembering the woman in the photograph who served as Marty’s muse. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.