Love Potion No 9 (1992)

PG-13 | 96 mins | Romantic comedy | 13 November 1992

Director:

Dale Launer

Writer:

Dale Launer

Producer:

Dale Launer

Cinematographer:

William Wages

Editor:

Suzanne Pettit

Production Designer:

Linda Pearl

Production Company:

Twentieth Century Fox
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HISTORY

       According to a production brief in the 6 Nov 1990 HR, principal photography began 7 Oct 1990 in Atlanta, GA. Additional locations included Chattanooga, TN, and Los Angeles, CA.
       An item in the 13 Apr 1992 HR stated the film had been scheduled for a spring 1992 release, but was delayed until late summer after Dale Launer re-shot thirty-five pages of the script. An article in the 11 Aug 1992 DV reported that most of the teen movies released in the summer of 1992 were performing poorly, and Twentieth Century Fox decided to delay the planned 21 Aug 1992 release of Love Potion No. 9. Reportedly, Fox considered releasing the film in a “token two-market regional release” before releasing it on video. However, Fox executive vice president Tom Sherak stated that they were taking a “wait-and-see attitude” and had only decided to move the release from summer to a later date. The film was finally released domestically on 13 Nov 1992.
       An article in the 23 Oct 1990 HR announced that Filmstar Inc. signed a foreign distribution agreement with Fox to distribute five of their films, including Love Potion No. 9. On 12 Sep 1991, articles in the HR and DV reported that Fox filed a $9.4 million law suit against Filmstar Inc., alleging that Filmstar “reneged” on their production financing deal. The suit claimed Filmstar agreed to pay a minimum guarantee for each film, regardless of the film’s success. Fox alleged that Filmstar delayed payments on The Five Heartbeats (1991, ... More Less

       According to a production brief in the 6 Nov 1990 HR, principal photography began 7 Oct 1990 in Atlanta, GA. Additional locations included Chattanooga, TN, and Los Angeles, CA.
       An item in the 13 Apr 1992 HR stated the film had been scheduled for a spring 1992 release, but was delayed until late summer after Dale Launer re-shot thirty-five pages of the script. An article in the 11 Aug 1992 DV reported that most of the teen movies released in the summer of 1992 were performing poorly, and Twentieth Century Fox decided to delay the planned 21 Aug 1992 release of Love Potion No. 9. Reportedly, Fox considered releasing the film in a “token two-market regional release” before releasing it on video. However, Fox executive vice president Tom Sherak stated that they were taking a “wait-and-see attitude” and had only decided to move the release from summer to a later date. The film was finally released domestically on 13 Nov 1992.
       An article in the 23 Oct 1990 HR announced that Filmstar Inc. signed a foreign distribution agreement with Fox to distribute five of their films, including Love Potion No. 9. On 12 Sep 1991, articles in the HR and DV reported that Fox filed a $9.4 million law suit against Filmstar Inc., alleging that Filmstar “reneged” on their production financing deal. The suit claimed Filmstar agreed to pay a minimum guarantee for each film, regardless of the film’s success. Fox alleged that Filmstar delayed payments on The Five Heartbeats (1991, see entry) in order to evaluate the film’s domestic box-office success, and when Fox requested payment, Filmstar allegedly declined to meet its contractual obligations. Fox terminated its licensing agreement with Filmstar and filed the lawsuit. HR noted that Filmstar was struggling financially and reportedly on the verge of closing. Filmstar filed an 8-K filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, noting that the company might be “rendered insolvent” and forced to “consider reorganization or possible liquidation.” The result of the lawsuit has not been determined.
       End credits include the following acknowledgments: “Film footage from ‘Love Is A Many Splendored Thing,’ ‘Journey To The Center Of The Earth,’ ‘Three Coins In The Fountain,” ‘Demetrius And The Gladiators’ courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation”; “Nausea used by permission of New Directions Publishing Corporation”; “The Major League Baseball trademarks depicted in this motion picture were licensed by Major League Baseball Properties, Inc.” and “Filmed in Atlanta, Georgia, Chattanooga, Tennessee, Los Angeles, California.”
       End credits also include “special thanks” to: “Club America Vacations, The Read House, Chattanooga, Tennessee, and to Marisa’s ‘Boyfriends’: Mike Matassa, Robert Hendrix, Roy Roaker, Herman Raloder, Anthony Stewart, Herman Mason, Bernard Smith, John Waters, James Jones, Ralph Worrell, Alfonzo Datson, Brian Wilson, Henry Johnson, Ray Sergeant, Waddell Stanley, Larry Waits, Robert Cotton, Al Jacobs, John Schaufelberger, Joseph Walsh, Brian Mikulin, John Saye, Mark Rossi, Farrell Wooley, Cleveland Jones, Lee Shepard, Tony Singleton, Jeremy White, William Jackson, Lee Staggs, Mike Treadway, John Whitley, Eric Hamilton, Keith Roper, Adam Smith, James Walton, Ricky Morrow, Summer Sillmon, Charles Harris, M. Watkins, Jerry Jones, Kenneth Lofton, Al Gardner, Gerry Green, Prince Lee, Virgil Stephens, Stephen Adam, Wilbert Rogers, Harris Buston, Leo Edwards, Robert Crawford, J. I Chambers, Jeremy Cheatwood, Richard Gates, Ronald Lee, Gene Voyles, Larry Singletary, Chris Flurer, Jeffery Wix, Edward Williallms, Melving Thomas, Charles Foster, Cameron Kriss, Michael Woody, Thomas Walker, H. S. Fears, Eugene Woods, Bill Sheehan, Freddie Holmes, Matthew Golgan, Cary Hall, Adam Trammell, James Ponder, Michael Harney, James Glenn, Lyle Shirey, Troy Roundtree, Jerome Fulford, Willie Griffin, John Tillman, Darrell Ware, Ronald Hood, James Johnson, Cunningham Gregory, Johnny Randolph, Tommy Gurley, Roy McComb, Antonio Foster, Chris Taylor, Keith Houch, David Rogers, Bill Stevens, Mark Stub, Shawn Fisher, Rudolph Freeman, Michael Winfrey, Dennis Price, Ross Florence, Brian Cook, Joe Brown, Leroy Irving, Ben Griffith, Aaron Staples, Chad Collyard, Mike Beykin, Ned Green, Ralph Trammell, Brian Abernathy, Seth Barlier, Richard Smith, Ronald Standard, Jerry Simmons, Daniel Autrey, Scott Hanson, Carl Tyson, James Scott, Stuart Cox, James Hutton, Julian Furey, Mark Hampton, William Hill, Steve Espinosa, Luellan Verdell, Ashley Jones, James Gillett, Richard Fitzgerald, Jerry Bell, John Spach, Emmett Mathis, Darren Hale, Harold Smith, Duane Green, Leroy Bright, Harold Robinson, Richard Shiffield, Wayne Thomas, C. I. Baker, Howard Robin, David Anthony, Roosevelt Lacy, Gene Mitchell, Randy Ragsdale, Charles Turner, Rob Walker, Lonnie Hunter, Travis Seymour, Joseph Falk, Charles Johnson, Eddie Childs, James Bailey, Mendlsen Leggett, Wallace Griffin, Nolan Leonard, Edward Brooks, Emanuel Jackson, Ernest Williams, Jackie Smith, Carl Gillard, Louis Lard, Melvin Traylor, Donny Rutledge, Lamont Gibbs, Willie Barnett, Melvin Watkins, Alfonso Bemley, James Willias, Joseph Collyard, Steve Gunn, Roger Osborn, Anthony Marshall, Lee Carlson, Stanley Brown, Nolan Harper, Darrell Carter, David Aiken, Alvin Curtis, Marvin Robinson, Frederick McCarthy, Thomas Cobb, Harvey Lindsey, Dudley Brumfield, Tony Jones, William Butler, Charles Darius, Art Carson, James Griffin, Duncan McKelvey, Lamont Sayles, Edward Dowler, Oscar Smith, Darrell Meek, Bernard White, William Anderson, Joseph Gains, Kenneth Morley, Johnny, Gregory Banks, Henry Thomas, Gary Powell, Stan Hartman, Andrew Byrd, Robert Cox, Todd Guren, Kasey Hodge, William Armstrong, Karl Bell, Jeff McClure, Jerry Harris, Arthur Clad, Mark Bell, Michael Mellard, Brett Hanez, Joseph Choppell, Richard Anderson, Timothy McKenny, Steven Grange, Alfonso Cobb, Dexter Cameron, T. J. Mannenga, Bruce Strickland, Charles Betts, Doug Belli, Doyle Pike, James Jens Jr., Thomas Smith, Keri Anderson, Allan Parker, Michael Alexander, John Murray, Sean Almark, Thomas Payton, Graeme Jones, David Daniel, Glen Cox, Andy Lynn, Miguel Granado, Willie Grable, Stephen Bowers, Robert Peoples, Sylvester Rowe, Parnell Jackson, Frank Curry, Michael Dobson, Richard Alemendor, Greg Ford, Gerald Brown, Randy Kent, Randolph Wooter, Albert Barnett, Mark Andersen, Donald Leicht, Don Welk, Wilson Holston, Leslie Breedlove, Kyle Johnson, D. T. Stephen, Kenneth Thompson, Mike Madlem, Gregory Cannon, Jack Russell, James Adams, Jim Bing, Dave Swartz, Scott Selsor, Lorenzo Haygood, Frank Davis, Johnathan Keissman, Michael Scheidigger, Gregory Williams, Mark Carmack, Marcell Holmes, John Sawyer, John Ponder, Max Coleman, Donnel Lewis, John Hendric, Gene Carter, Lisa Jenkins, Desmond Marsh, Larry Davis, Robert Lester, Greg West, Larry Rayford, Sammie Wellar, Charles Williams, Robert Bodger, Benjamin Pugi, Homer Williams, Raymond Jones, Darryl Brink, Ron Cornelius, Win Roland, James Bennet, Norman Childs, Carton Cruse, Calvin Wiggins, David Moss, Neil Legett, Milton Astin, Fisher Dobson, Darrell Welk, Wayne Stevenson, David McFair, Victgor Npober, Solly Sheppard, Raymond Lector, Wayne Miron, John Geln, Willard Wines, Ernest Gregory, David Rupnow, Bobby Shepard, Jeffrey Roger, Leny Storell, Donald Crider, Horace Dunn, C. Martin, Lenoris Avery, Michael Porter, Frederick Lamm, C. V. Walker, Jack Corwin, Eddie Battle, Raleight Lloyd, R. Rodriguez, Samuel Mask, George Holloman, Marian Park, Christopher Baer, Robert Cub, Jerry Beckham, Kyther Potts, Lee Moses, Ronnie Mark, Tom McGraw, Paul Kontoyats, Frank Gardner, Arlander Lavant, S. Khalid, Gars Johannes.”

      The 2 Jan 1991 DV noted that screenwriter Dale Launer made his feature film directorial debut on Love Potion No. 9. End credits state that the animals are trained by Brian McMillan’s Animal Rentals Unlimited. However, the credit for head trainer is misspelled as “Brain McMillan.”
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
2 Jan 1991.
---
Daily Variety
12 Sep 1991
p. 4, 13.
Daily Variety
11 Aug 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Nov 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Sep 1991
p. 1, 8.
Los Angeles Times
13 Nov 1992
p. 8.
New York Times
13 Nov 1992
p. 12.
Variety
13 Apr 1992.
---
Variety
16 Nov 1992
p. 65.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Dale Launer Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Unit prod mgr, Los Angeles unit
1st asst dir, Los Angeles unit
2d asst dir, Los Angeles unit
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Dir of photog, Los Angeles unit
Cam op, Los Angeles unit
Lighting tech, Los Angeles unit
Key grip, Los Angeles unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dir, Los Angeles unit
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Post prod supv
1s asst ed
2d asst ed
Atlanta post prod services
Addl ed, Los Angeles unit
Apprentice ed, Los Angeles unit
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Lead person
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Asst const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Set dec, Los Angeles unit
Prop master, Los Angeles unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus ed
Scoring eng
Scoring eng
Scoring eng
Programming consultant
Programming consultant
Mus ed, Los Angeles unit
SOUND
Sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Co-supv sd ed
Supv ADR ed
Foley walker
Foley walker
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
ADR/Foley mixer
Spec vocal eff
Prod sd mixer, Los Angeles unit
Sd ed, Supv, Los Angeles unit
Sd ed, Los Angeles unit
Sd ed, Los Angeles unit
Sd ed, Los Angeles unit
VISUAL EFFECTS
Main title des
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup des
Key hairstylist
Asst hair & makeup
Eff makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Voice casting
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst to Mr. Launer
Asst to Mr. Launer
Asst to Mr. Launer
Asst to Mr. Launer
Asst loc mgr
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Unit pub
Casting asst
Atlanta casting
Extras casting
Post prod accountant
Prod asst
Prod asst
Head trainer
Trainer
Trainer
Atlanta trainer
Craft service
Scr supv, Los Angeles unit
Loc mgr, Los Angeles unit
Prod accountant, Los Angeles unit
Prod coord, Los Angeles unit
Transportation coord, Los Angeles unit
Transportation capt, Los Angeles unit
Extras casting, Los Angeles unit
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Inspired by the song Love Potion #9 by Mike Stoller and Jerry Lieber (publication date undetermined).
SONGS
“Love Potion #9,” written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, performed by The Clovers, courtesy of EMI Records Group/EMI Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
“Love Potion #9” (End Title Version), written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, performed by Carole Davis, arranged and produced by James Wilson and J. Rodgers
“Born To Lose,” written by Ted Daffan, performed by Ray Charles, courtesy of Ray Charles Enterprises
+
SONGS
“Love Potion #9,” written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, performed by The Clovers, courtesy of EMI Records Group/EMI Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
“Love Potion #9” (End Title Version), written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, performed by Carole Davis, arranged and produced by James Wilson and J. Rodgers
“Born To Lose,” written by Ted Daffan, performed by Ray Charles, courtesy of Ray Charles Enterprises
“I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You),” written by Ronnie Shannon, performed by Aretha Franklin, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“I Need A Man,” written by Annie Lennox and David A. Stewart, performed by Eurythmics, courtesy of BMG Records (U.K.), Ltd.
“Y.M.C.A.,” written by Victor Willis, Henri Belolo and Jacques Morali
performed by The Village People, courtesy of PolyGram Special Markets, a division of PolyGram Group Distribution and Scorpio Music, Paris, France
“Pain In My Heart,” written by Naomi Neville, performed by Otis Redding, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Big Trouble,” written by Fran Lucci and Danny Powers, performed by Fran Lucci
“The Good, The Bad And The Ugly,” written and performed by Ennio Morricone, courtesy of EMI Records Group/EMI Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
“The More I See You,” written by Harry Warren and Mack Gordon
“Mack The Knife,” written by Kurt Weill and Bert Brecht
“Serenade in Blue,” written by Harry Warren and Mack Gordon
“Low Rider,” written by Allen Sylvester, Harold Brown, Morris Dickerson, Gerald Goldstein, Leroy Jordan, Lee Oskar, Charles Miller and Howard Scott, performed by War, courtesy of Rhino Records
“Ruby Baby,” written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, performed by Donald Fagen, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Love Potion No. 9
Love Potion #9
Release Date:
13 November 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 13 November 1992
New York opening: week of 13 November 1992
Production Date:
began 7 October 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
22 October 1992
Copyright Number:
PA583853
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras & Lenses
Duration(in mins):
96
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31327
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Paul Matthews, a lovelorn biochemist, visits Madame Ruth, a gypsy who reads his palm and claims she sees no women in his life. She offers a sample of “Love potion number 8,” instructs him to dilute it by one thousand percent, and asserts that when he swallows it, women will find his voice irresistible. As a scientist, Paul is doubtful, but he pockets the sample. He goes to a bar with his friends, and they dare him to flirt with an attractive woman, who rudely turns him down. Meanwhile, Diane Farrow, a psycho-biologist who is Paul’s co-worker, drives home in her defective Alta Pazzoli car, which cannot stop without stalling, and a policeman tickets her for rolling through a stop sign. When she arrives home, her occasional boyfriend, Gary Logan, stops by to have sex, and quickly leaves. Meanwhile, when Paul arrives home, his friends send a hooker named Marisa to make him feel better about being rebuffed earlier at the bar. As he mixes her a drink, Marisa eyes his electronic equipment, and then searches his bathroom’s medicine cabinet, sampling various items. Later, she returns to her pimp’s car, and announces that Paul merely wanted to talk, and his apartment is full of expensive items. Inside, Paul tosses the love potion sample into the trash. Later, his cat routs through the garbage and licks the potion. She meows and the neighborhood male cats swarm into Paul’s house. The next day, Paul tells Diane about the potion’s effect on his cat. They try the potion on a female chimpanzee in the laboratory, and when she makes ... +


Paul Matthews, a lovelorn biochemist, visits Madame Ruth, a gypsy who reads his palm and claims she sees no women in his life. She offers a sample of “Love potion number 8,” instructs him to dilute it by one thousand percent, and asserts that when he swallows it, women will find his voice irresistible. As a scientist, Paul is doubtful, but he pockets the sample. He goes to a bar with his friends, and they dare him to flirt with an attractive woman, who rudely turns him down. Meanwhile, Diane Farrow, a psycho-biologist who is Paul’s co-worker, drives home in her defective Alta Pazzoli car, which cannot stop without stalling, and a policeman tickets her for rolling through a stop sign. When she arrives home, her occasional boyfriend, Gary Logan, stops by to have sex, and quickly leaves. Meanwhile, when Paul arrives home, his friends send a hooker named Marisa to make him feel better about being rebuffed earlier at the bar. As he mixes her a drink, Marisa eyes his electronic equipment, and then searches his bathroom’s medicine cabinet, sampling various items. Later, she returns to her pimp’s car, and announces that Paul merely wanted to talk, and his apartment is full of expensive items. Inside, Paul tosses the love potion sample into the trash. Later, his cat routs through the garbage and licks the potion. She meows and the neighborhood male cats swarm into Paul’s house. The next day, Paul tells Diane about the potion’s effect on his cat. They try the potion on a female chimpanzee in the laboratory, and when she makes a sound, a male chimpanzee breaks through a wall to reach her. Paul and Diane test the potion and discover that when someone swallows it, any sound from their vocal chords will make the opposite sex fall in love with them while angering members of the same sex. The potion must be diluted and the effects last only four hours. Deciding human testing is necessary, Paul and Diane divide the remaining potion and agree not to speak to each other for three weeks. On her way home, the same police officer stops Diane. However, she uses the potion and he asks for a date instead of ticketing her. She receives a notice that her automobile insurance is cancelled because of her previous tickets. At the insurance company, she sprays the potion and a male agent immediately reinstates her policy. Outside, Diane bumps into Enrico Pazzoli, captivating him as she apologizes and walks away, pausing to look at a diamond necklace in a store window. Moments later, he catches up with Diane at her car. Insisting she is the most beautiful woman in the world, he hands her the diamond necklace. She refuses to accept it, but changes her mind when he introduces himself and acknowledges his family’s company made her car. He invites her to a black tie gala, and purchases a gown for her to wear with the necklace. The ball is in honor of Prince Geoffrey, the playboy Prince of England, and he is among the men caught in the spell cast by Diane’s potion-enhanced voice. Later, Gary Logan visits Diane’s home and is refused entrance by Prince Geoffrey’s security officers. Meanwhile, Paul’s “research” proves the potion is one hundred percent effective on the opposite sex. He merely has to speak to attract women, and caps his experiment with an evening making love to the members of the Sigma Delta Pi sorority. Although he is arrested for being in a sorority house after hours, he laughs through his mug shot. Diane’s potion-enhanced voice gets Paul released. As they leave the police station and get into Prince Geoffrey’s limousine, she does not want her voice to affect Paul, so she remains silent while indicating Prince Geoffrey should invite Paul to join them at an event that evening. When they arrive at the party, Diane uses the spray and offers a squirt to Paul. She watches as he moves across the room, effortlessly attracting women. He notices her leave with Prince Geoffrey, and rushes outside as they drive away. The next day, Diane reveals that Prince Geoffrey proposed, but she needs to think about it. She states that she always felt ugly and had not had a date in four years, and now the world’s most desirable man finds her attractive. Paul is upset that she forgot they went out to lunch once, which he considered a date. She apologizes for not realizing it was a date. He admits he did not ask for a second date because she mentioned Gary was “kind of” her boyfriend. Diane insists Gary is not her boyfriend, and agrees to date Paul. They go on several dates and fall in love. Paul purchases an engagement ring and plans a weekend getaway. However, when he knocks on her door, there is no answer. When she finally telephones him, she reveals that she is in love with Gary. Upset, Paul decides to pretend to be her friend and make her realize Gary’s faults. She meets him, and although she claims Gary is perfect, she admits she does not like everything about him. At that moment, Gary telephones and she agrees to his request to stop seeing Paul. As Paul returns home, Marisa, the hooker, is breaking into his apartment, but pretends she was waiting for him. When he invites her inside, she riffles through his medicine cabinet and samples the potion. It has an immediate effect on Paul, who gives her the remaining potion, as well as his electronic equipment. Four hours later, the effects fade and Paul realizes the potion’s strength. Suspecting Gary is using it to control Diane, he contacts Madame Ruth and learns Gary obtained the rest of love potion number 8. He asks for something more powerful and she pulls out Love potion number 9, but warns Paul to be certain Diane truly loved him. If they both once loved each other, they will love each other again forever. However, if she did not love him, he will love her for the rest of his life and she will hate him. Madame Ruth instructs they must both drink from the same cup and kiss. Five minutes later, he will hear a song in the breeze if it works. If it does not work, he will taste mule sweat. Paul asks his friends for assistance, but they do not believe him about the potion. However, Marisa arrives and announces she is running low on potion. Her voice enthralls Paul and his friends, who hand over their wallets and reveal Gary has the remaining potion. Four hours later, his friends recover from the spell and agree to help Paul. They go to Diane’s home, where her friend, Sally, is picking up items for Diane’s wedding taking place in one hour. Sally is to be matron of honor, but is unhappy at Diane’s sudden decision to marry Gary. She agrees to help Paul, and they race to the church where Sally will get Diane to drink the potion, and then bring the glass to Paul. Diane drinks from the champagne glass, and Sally reaches for it, but Gary arrives, drinks from the glass and kisses Diane. Paul telephones Madame Ruth for advice, and she tells him to drink from the glass, too, and kiss Diane, who will choose the man she truly loves. Paul sees Marisa arrive to find Gary. He covers his ears as he runs past her, bursts into Diane’s room, and drinks the champagne. He tries to kiss Diane, but Gary stops him. As Gary and police officers lead him outside, Paul sees Marisa and covers his ears. However, Gary is enchanted by her voice. He takes Marisa to his car and gives her the remaining potion, warning it should be diluted. Gary kisses Marisa and is confused to taste mule sweat. As he returns to the chapel, Marisa swallows a drop of the undiluted potion. The wedding has begun when she steps inside, but her potion-enhanced cough stops everything. Women become enraged, and the men rush toward her. As Marisa runs away, every man follows her. At the police station, officers see the crowd following her, and Paul covers his ears as she runs by. Moments later, Paul is the lone man in the station. Hundreds of men chase Marisa into an alley, where she orders them to stop and learns she can make them do whatever she wants. Meanwhile, Paul rushes to the chapel and kisses Diane. However, Gary returns and she runs into his arm. Paul punches him and walks outside. He waits five minutes for Diane, but it takes six minutes for her to realize that Paul is the love of her life. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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