Mississippi Masala (1992)

R | 118 mins | Romance, Comedy-drama | 5 February 1992

Director:

Mira Nair

Producers:

Michael Nozik, Mira Nair

Cinematographer:

Ed Lachman

Editor:

Roberto Silvi

Production Designer:

Mitch Epstein

Production Company:

Mirabai Films
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HISTORY

The 3 Oct 1989 HR stated that filmmaker Mira Nair was auditioning actors in Bombay, India, for the lead in her upcoming film, which was reportedly already in production in the southern part of the country.
       According to production notes by Mira Nair, in AMPAS library files, the filmmaker invited “independent financiers and Hollywood studio executives” to London, England, to discuss her next project, following the success of her previous film, Salaam Bombay (1988). Some rejected the proposed interracial love story, believing it lacked commercial potential. In the 15 May 1990 DV, Nair recounted an exchange with a studio executive, who requested she add a “white protagonist” to the story. She declined, but promised that all of the waiters in the film would be played by white actors. Cinecom International, which distributed her previous film, in association with Palace Pictures and Film Four, supplied financing.
       Nair first learned of the 1972 expulsion of Uganda’s Indian population from an article by Jane Kramer in the The New Yorker. She also discovered that many of the exiles relocated to the southern U.S., where they found success operating motels as family businesses, eventually creating Indian communities throughout the region. Nair began her research in Mar 1989, visiting Indian-owned motels in North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Mississippi. She recruited Sooni Traporevala, her collaborator on Salaam Bombay, to write the screenplay. During their stay in Mississippi, Nair and Traporevala met a number of Indians who were deeply nostalgic about their African homeland, which led them to Kampala, Uganda, where they discovered “an ... More Less

The 3 Oct 1989 HR stated that filmmaker Mira Nair was auditioning actors in Bombay, India, for the lead in her upcoming film, which was reportedly already in production in the southern part of the country.
       According to production notes by Mira Nair, in AMPAS library files, the filmmaker invited “independent financiers and Hollywood studio executives” to London, England, to discuss her next project, following the success of her previous film, Salaam Bombay (1988). Some rejected the proposed interracial love story, believing it lacked commercial potential. In the 15 May 1990 DV, Nair recounted an exchange with a studio executive, who requested she add a “white protagonist” to the story. She declined, but promised that all of the waiters in the film would be played by white actors. Cinecom International, which distributed her previous film, in association with Palace Pictures and Film Four, supplied financing.
       Nair first learned of the 1972 expulsion of Uganda’s Indian population from an article by Jane Kramer in the The New Yorker. She also discovered that many of the exiles relocated to the southern U.S., where they found success operating motels as family businesses, eventually creating Indian communities throughout the region. Nair began her research in Mar 1989, visiting Indian-owned motels in North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Mississippi. She recruited Sooni Traporevala, her collaborator on Salaam Bombay, to write the screenplay. During their stay in Mississippi, Nair and Traporevala met a number of Indians who were deeply nostalgic about their African homeland, which led them to Kampala, Uganda, where they discovered “an Indian town in Africa.” Traporevala completed her first draft of the screenplay in Aug 1989, which Nair brought to actor Denzel Washington, her choice for the role of “Demetrius.” The women returned to Mississippi and chose the town of Greenwood as the primary location, in part because its white and black communities were separated by a river, emphasizing the contrast between the prosperity of the former and the poverty of the latter. Nair and Traporevala also focused their research on the black community, with some assistance from Denzel Washington.
       Nair returned to India, hoping to find a young Indian actress for the role a “Mina.” She contacted English casting director Suzy Figgis, who responded by sending photographs of approximately twenty-five candidates from different walks of life. From this group, Nair chose actress Sarita Choudhury.
       During the summer of 1990, the filmmaker spent several weeks in Uganda, scouting locations and auditioning actors. In early Aug 1990, Nair gathered much of the cast in Mississippi to rehearse for ten days. Principal photography began on 24 Aug 1990 and lasted through mid-October. Nair edited a “rough cut” of the footage in New York City before continuing production in Uganda. The crew arrived in Kampala in mid-November, and was augmented by technicians from both Uganda and neighboring Kenya. Nair arrived later in the month to confirm locations and cast background actors from Kampala’s revived Indian community, using the local Hindu temple as the “nucleus” of the operation. She dispatched costume and production designers to Indian homes, where they collected clothing and furniture from the early 1970s. Adding to the authenticity was the inclusion of several locations in which the incidents depicted actually occurred. One such location was the barroom in the Speke Hotel, in which Nair was able to recreate “events of hollow abandon” from the weeks preceding the Indian expulsion. Nair completed the effect by dressing Afrigo, a popular local band, in flamboyant 1970s attire and having them play an Indian song from the period. While the Ugandan government was generally cooperative, Nair encountered difficulties when a package labeled “Idi Amin” was shipped to her from England, containing the costume for actor Joseph Olita, who portrayed the brutal dictator. Although Amin had been living in exile for ten years, the costume was impounded at the airport and Nair required the intervention of an army commander to have it released.
       Photography was completed within two weeks in locations in and around Kampala, at Entebbe Airport, and at Lake Victoria, the source of the Nile River. The scene in which a group of Indians are bussed to the airport was shot over a three-day period, and included several Indian background actors who had lived through similar events, one of whom complained that her 1972 exile was much less tedious than its recreation for the film. Nair noted that Mississipi Masala was the first picture made in Uganda since The African Queen (1952, see entry).
       Although post-production was completed by summer 1991, release was delayed due to Cinecom being forced out of business by bankruptcy. However, the picture acquired distribution through The Samuel Goldwyn Company after winning the Golden Osella for best screenplay at the 48th Venice Film Festival in Venice, Italy, as reported in the 16 Sep 1991 Var. A Feb 1992 release was planned for the $5 million production. Mississippi Masala premiered 17 Jan 1992 at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, UT. Less than a month later, it debuted in Los Angeles, CA, at a benefit for the Salaam Baalak Trust, a charitable organization founded by Nair. She attended the event, along with actors Denzel Washington, Sarita Choudhury, Charles Dutton, Debbie Allen, Sandra Bernhard, and Amy Irving. The picture opened in Los Angeles on 14 Feb 1992 to mostly positive reviews.
       On 20 Mar 1992, LA Weekly reported gross receipts of $5.3 million from 335 screens across the U.S. Goldwyn executive Steve Rothenberg cited the film’s appeal to an underserved market, noting that audiences were comprised of equal parts black, white, and Indian patrons. While the picture was especially popular in New York City, San Francisco, CA, and Chicago, IL, its audience was somewhat limited to major cities and “the art-house circuit.” However, Bingham Ray of October Films saw his company’s refusal of the picture as a missed opportunity, and expressed regret for underestimating the popularity of Mira Nair and Denzel Washington.
       The 20 Mar 1992 Screen International reported that an unnamed faction planned to bomb openings on the island of Trinidad to protest the film’s portrayal of Indian women. Targets included the Monarch Theater in Tuna Puna, and Lakshmi Hindu College in St. Augustine. The group threatened further bombings if the government censor allowed its release. Although Hindu leader Sat Maharaj took the threats seriously, no such letters were delivered to United Cinemas, which owned the Monarch, or to ATM, the picture’s regional distributor.
       End credits include the following statements: "For Mjaan"; "In memory of Mohamed Oreste Wafula"; "Grateful thanks: Eric Albertson; Kulsum & Yusuf Alibhai; Gabriel Auer; Dr. Kevin Cahill; Maudie and Langdon Schuyler Clay; Dastakar, Farrukh Dhondy; Demetrius Fields; Film Finances; Inc.; Amitav Ghosh; The Greenwood Commonwealth; John Horhn, Mississippi Division of Tourism; The Indian Association of Mississippi; The Indian Motel Association; Mahmood Mamdani; The Mississippi Film Office; Praveen & Shefali Nair; Sultan & Zarina Nanji; Lopa Patel; Virendra Ponda; Ranna Shah; Shelby Stone; Stephen C. Swid; Percy Tarapore; Anil Tejani; Varsha & Jaimini Thaker; Uganda Ministry of Information and Broadcasting; Commander, Entebbe Airport; Office of the Army Commander, National Resistance Army of Uganda; Office of the Inspector General of Police, Uganda Police Force; Bhikhu Vanmali; Bart Walker; White-Pullman/Holt; The People of Kampala, Uganda, and Greenwood, Mississippi”; “Hakuna Matata* (‘no problem’ in Kiswahili).” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Oct 1992.
---
Daily Variety
15 May 1990
p. 1, 19.
Daily Variety
23 Aug 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Oct 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Aug 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Nov 1991
p. 8, 18.
LA Weekly
7 Feb 1992
p. 65.
LA Weekly
20 Mar 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
13 Feb 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
14 Feb 1992
p. 8.
New York Times
5 Feb 1992
p. 15.
Screen International
20 Mar 1992.
---
Variety
16 May 1990.
---
Variety
16 Sep 1991.
---
Variety
16 Sep 1993.
---
Variety
23 Sep 1991
p. 75.
Village Voice
18 Feb 1992
p. 64.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Co-starring
as
Introducing
as
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
SCS Films Inc. presents
In association with Odyssey/Cinecom International
and Film Four International
A Mirabai Films production
In association with MovieWorks
and Black River Productions
A film by Mira Nair
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d asst dir, Uganda unit
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Key grip
Best boy elec
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
3d elec
4th elec
Steadicam
Cam loader
Picture car coord
24 frame video eng
Gaffer, Uganda unit
Best boy elec, Uganda unit
Generator op, Uganda unit
Elec, Uganda unit
Elec, Uganda unit
Elec, Uganda unit
Elec, Uganda unit
Dolly grip, Uganda unit
Grip, Uganda unit
Grip, Uganda unit
Mississippi still photog
Uganda still photog
Cam
Lighting equip by
California
Lighting equip by
Nairobi
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
Art dir, Uganda unit
FILM EDITORS
Post prod supv
Assoc film ed
1st asst film ed
2d asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative matcher
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Charge scenic
Leadman
Const coord
Asst set dec
Prop asst
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Const asst
2d scenic artist
Painter
Painter
Prop master, Uganda unit
Prop asst, Uganda unit
Lead dresser, Uganda unit
Const coord, Uganda unit
Scenic, Uganda unit
Set dresser, Uganda unit
Set dresser, Uganda unit
Set dresser, Uganda unit
COSTUMES
Cost des, Mississippi
Cost des, Uganda
Cost des, Indian
Ward supv
Costumer
Ward shopper
Ward supv, Uganda unit
Ward asst, Uganda unit
MUSIC
Mus comp
Asst mus ed
Mississippi mus consultant
Musicians:
Violin, violin synthesizers & percussion
Percussion
Acoustic & elec guitar
Piano & synthesizers
Harmonica
West African percussion
West African percussion
Ugandan percussion
Tabla
[and]
Mridangam & ghatam
Special musical guests:
Electric guitar
[and]
Vocal & tambura
Mus eng
Mus eng
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Boom op, Uganda unit
Re-rec mixer
ADR mixer
Foley walker
VISUAL EFFECTS
Map illustration
Title illustrations
Main and end titles des and prod
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Addl hair
PRODUCTION MISC
Invaluable support
Casting, Mississippi
Casting, New York
Casting, Uganda
Casting, London
Unit mgr
Scr supv
Prod auditor
Asst auditor
Prod coord
Transportation coord
Post-prod supv
Asst prod coord
Asst loc mgr
Loc asst
Casting asst
Addl Indian casting
Mirabai Films coord
Asst to Mira Nair
Asst to Michael Nozik
Asst to Michael Nozik
Picture car coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prop PA
Craft service
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Uganda prod exec, Uganda unit
Unit mgr, Uganda unit
Loc mgr, Uganda unit
Prod consultant, Uganda unit
Asst prod coord, Uganda unit
Asst auditor, Uganda unit
New York City coord, Uganda unit
Prod secy, Uganda unit
Prod secy, Uganda unit
Transportation coord, Uganda unit
Transportation capt, Uganda unit
Picture car coord, Uganda unit
Casting asst, Uganda unit
Casting asst, Uganda unit
Casting asst, Uganda unit
Prod asst, Uganda unit
Prod asst, Uganda unit
Prod asst, Uganda unit
Prod asst, Uganda unit
Prod asst, Uganda unit
Nurse, Uganda unit
Uganda research, Uganda unit
Driver, Uganda unit
Driver, Uganda unit
Driver, Uganda unit
Driver, Uganda unit
Driver, Uganda unit
Driver, Uganda unit
Post prod facility
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt co-coord
Stunts
Stunt double
Stunt double
COLOR PERSONNEL
Dailies timer
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
“Mera Joota Hai Japani,” performed by Mukesh and chorus, music by Shankar Jaikishan, lyrics by Shailendra, courtesy of HMV (The Gramophone Co. of India, Ltd)
“Caledonia’s Party,” performed by Smiley Lewis, written by Dave Bartholomew, courtesy of EMI UNART Catalogue Inc.
“Sawan Ka Mahina,” performed by Viji Subramaniam, Sattar Tari, & Gopal Marathe, courtesy of HMV (The Gramophone Co. of India, Ltd)
+
SONGS
“Mera Joota Hai Japani,” performed by Mukesh and chorus, music by Shankar Jaikishan, lyrics by Shailendra, courtesy of HMV (The Gramophone Co. of India, Ltd)
“Caledonia’s Party,” performed by Smiley Lewis, written by Dave Bartholomew, courtesy of EMI UNART Catalogue Inc.
“Sawan Ka Mahina,” performed by Viji Subramaniam, Sattar Tari, & Gopal Marathe, courtesy of HMV (The Gramophone Co. of India, Ltd)
“Congratulations,” performed by Sidney Youngblood, written by Sidney Youngblood, Ralph Hamm, Marcus Staab, & Claus Zundel, courtesy of Arista Records
“Just One Of Them Thangs,” performed by Keith Sweat & Gerald Levert, courtesy of Electra Entertainment
“Ton Of Joy,” performed by Otis Redding, courtesy of Atco Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“New China Awakening,” written by James Williamson, courtesy of Capitol Production Music/Ole Georg
“Angel From Heaven,” written & performed by Willie Cobbs
“Up Above My Head,” performed by Marion Williams, courtesy of Spirit Feel Records, Inc.
“Ahista Ahista,” performed by Jagjit Singh and Chitra Singh, music by Jagjit Singh, lyrics by Sudarshan Faakir, courtesy of HMV (The Gramophone Co. of India, Ltd)
“Autumn Girl,” performed by Cool Moon, written by Stephen Weiss, Michael Weiss, and Lieven Van Marcke
“Yancey Special,” performed by Pinetop Perkin, written by Meade Lux Lewis & Randy Razaf, courtesy of Blind Pig Records
“Kanda Ya Nini,” performed by Papy Matolodode Tex Group, Grand Pepe Kalle Ya M’Panya Et L’Empire Bakura
“Happy Birthday To You,” written by Mildred J. Hill & Patty S. Hill, courtesy of Summy Birchard, Inc. of Birch Tree Group, Ltd.
“Crosscut Saw,” written and performed by Sam Chapman, courtesy of Blue Goose Publishing Co.
“Zindagi Ek Safar Hai Suhana,” performed by The Afrigo Band, courtesy of HMV (The Gramophone Co. of India, Ltd)
“Jail Song,” written and performed by Habbey Sewarikyanga
“Mujse Pehli Si Muhabbat Mere Mehboob Na Maang,” performed by Noor Jehan, music by Rashid Atre, courtesy of EMI Pakistan, Ltd.
“Sad Feelin,” written & performed by Willie Cobbs
“Mundeke,” written & performed by The Afrigo Band.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 February 1992
Premiere Information:
Sundance Film Festival premiere: 17 January 1992
New York opening: 5 February 1992
Los Angeles opening: 14 February 1992
Production Date:
24 August--December 1990
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
118
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31159
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1972 Kampala, Uganda, Okelo admonishes his Indian friend, Jay, for publicly criticizing President Idi Amin in response to the dictator’s expulsion of Asians. In addition to placing himself at risk, Jay’s statement also endangers his wife, Kinnu, and daughter, Mina. The next day, Okelo accompanies the family as they begin their exile, and Jay ignores his friend’s tearful goodbye. Eighteen years later, the family has relocated to Greenwood, Mississippi, and lives in the Monte Carlo Motel, owned by members of their extended family. Kinnu operates a liquor store in a poor section of town, Mina works as a motel maid, and Jay is preoccupied with suing the Ugandan government for restitution. While driving her cousin Anil’s car, Mina has a rear-end collision with a utility van driven by Demetrius Williams, co-owner of a carpet-cleaning company. After they exchange personal information, a tow truck delivers Mina and the car to the motel. Anil’s anger turns to anxiety as his friends, Pontiac and Kante Napkin, warn that Demetrius may feign an injury and file a lawsuit. However, Napkin is one of Demetrius’s customers and believes he can discourage any legal action. While preparing for Anil’s wedding that evening, Kinnu worries that Mina is unappealing to Indian men because of her assertive personality and dark complexion. However, she is relieved when Mina leaves the ceremony with an affluent young man named Harry Patel. They attend a discotheque, where Mina encounters Demetrius on the dance floor. Although he is distracted by the presence of his former girl friend, Alicia LeShay, and her new lover, record producer Sylvester Artiste III, Demetrius ... +


In 1972 Kampala, Uganda, Okelo admonishes his Indian friend, Jay, for publicly criticizing President Idi Amin in response to the dictator’s expulsion of Asians. In addition to placing himself at risk, Jay’s statement also endangers his wife, Kinnu, and daughter, Mina. The next day, Okelo accompanies the family as they begin their exile, and Jay ignores his friend’s tearful goodbye. Eighteen years later, the family has relocated to Greenwood, Mississippi, and lives in the Monte Carlo Motel, owned by members of their extended family. Kinnu operates a liquor store in a poor section of town, Mina works as a motel maid, and Jay is preoccupied with suing the Ugandan government for restitution. While driving her cousin Anil’s car, Mina has a rear-end collision with a utility van driven by Demetrius Williams, co-owner of a carpet-cleaning company. After they exchange personal information, a tow truck delivers Mina and the car to the motel. Anil’s anger turns to anxiety as his friends, Pontiac and Kante Napkin, warn that Demetrius may feign an injury and file a lawsuit. However, Napkin is one of Demetrius’s customers and believes he can discourage any legal action. While preparing for Anil’s wedding that evening, Kinnu worries that Mina is unappealing to Indian men because of her assertive personality and dark complexion. However, she is relieved when Mina leaves the ceremony with an affluent young man named Harry Patel. They attend a discotheque, where Mina encounters Demetrius on the dance floor. Although he is distracted by the presence of his former girl friend, Alicia LeShay, and her new lover, record producer Sylvester Artiste III, Demetrius asks Mina to dance. Harry Patel resents being ignored and wants to leave, but Mina chooses to stay, saying she will find a way home. Demetrius introduces Mina to his brother and business partner, Tyrone, an aspiring actor and womanizer. Mina is amused by Tyrone’s attempts at flirtation, but she accepts a ride from Demetrius. Later, Kinnu finds Mina sitting by the swimming pool, and anxiously inquires about her daughter’s date. Mina shows little interest in Harry, but wants to know why her father has not maintained contact with Okelo. Kinnu ignores the question and concludes that Mina will never marry. In the morning, Demetrius and Tyrone arrive at Kante Napkin’s motel to begin work. The owner offers them tea and tells them of the solidarity he feels toward African Americans, hinting that it would be a conflict of interest to sue Anil. Demetrius laughs, assuring Napkin that he has no such intention. Mina telephones Demetrius to thank him for the ride, and he invites her to his father’s birthday party. On their way to the party, Mina recounts her family’s travels from Uganda to England before coming to Mississippi three years earlier, adding that she has never been to India. She describes herself as a “masala,” a mix of hot spices. At the party, Mina learns from Demetrius’s Aunt Rose that he ended his college education when his mother died so he could care for his aging father. As the party draws to a close, Alicia LeShay appears and Demetrius snubs her. He takes Mina for a walk along the bayou and they kiss. The next day, Demetrius invites Mina to spend a weekend with him in the seaside town of Biloxi, Mississippi. She gets her father’s permission, but misleads him by saying she is spending the night with a female friend. Jay receives a letter from the Ugandan government, offering him a court date to make his case for restitution, and he toasts the event with Kinnu. In Biloxi, Mina and Demetrius spend the evening in an amusement park, unaware that Anil, Pontiac, and Kante Napkin are close by. Afterward, Mina and Demetrius make love, but before they go to sleep, Mina asks him to wish her a happy birthday. In her dreams, she recalls the events surrounding her last birthday in Uganda, including the broadcast in which Idi Amin ordered the Asian expulsion, the ensuing argument between Jay and Okelo, and the discovery of a corpse in her backyard. In the morning, Anil notices Demetrius’s van outside the motel room and demands entry. Upon seeing Mina, Anil attacks Demetrius, but is quickly overwhelmed. Pontiac contacts police, and the two lovers are arrested. That afternoon, Tyrone arranges his brother’s release, and warns him that Indians can be just as prejudiced as white people. Kinnu and Jay berate Mina for the shame she has brought on her family, ignoring her declaration of love for Demetrius. Gossip about the incident spreads among Indian motel owners, all of whom cancel their contracts with Demetrius and Tyrone. The brothers’ struggling enterprise is further challenged when the bank threatens to repossess their van unless they repay their loan by the end of the month. Unwilling to remain with a failing business, Tyrone abandons his brother for a film career in Hollywood, California. Demetrius enters the Monte Carlo Motel hoping to speak to Mina, but Jay prohibits it. When he accuses Demetrius of being insensitive to the problems of Indian immigrants, the young man tells Jay of the oppression African Americans face in Mississippi, and reminds him that they are both people of color in the eyes of the white majority. Afterward, Jay tells Mina about his disillusionment with Okelo, who encouraged him to leave Uganda, saying Africa is for black Africans. He predicts the same racial prejudice from Demetrius and wants to save Mina the disappointment. Mina cites an incident in which Okelo risked his life for Jay, proving his love, but Jay does not respond. Desperate for money, Demetrius hires flamboyant attorney Phineas T. Turnbull to file a $50,000 lawsuit against Anil, claiming a back injury from the Biloxi incident. Anil accuses Jay’s family of ruining his life, and orders them out of his motel. Jay decides to move the family back to Uganda, but while he and Kinnu pack their belongings, Mina takes Anil’s car and asks Williben for help locating Demetrius. Williben directs her to the nearby town of Indianola, where Demetrius is trying to build a new clientele. Upon reaching Indianola, Mina follows Demetrius until he agrees to speak with her. He accuses her family of ruining his business, and she accuses him of using her to make Alicia jealous. Demetrius admits that this was his original intention, until he fell in love. Although Mina only intended to say goodbye, she now offers to join Demetrius in his search for a new town where he can start over. He accepts, and both notify their families of their plans. At Kinnu’s urging, Jay travels to Kampala, Uganda alone, where he learns that Okelo was killed by the secret police in 1972. Jay now understands why Okelo never responded to his letters, and he regrets slighting his friend on their final day together. Realizing there is no longer a place for him in Uganda, Jay tells Kinnu his home is with her in Mississippi. Before his return, he wanders the streets of Kampala, and joins a crowd gathered around a group of street performers. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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