Passenger 57 (1992)

R | 84 mins | Adventure | 6 November 1992

Director:

Kevin Hooks

Cinematographer:

Mark Irwin

Editor:

Richard Nord

Production Designer:

Jaymes Hinkle

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures
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HISTORY

A production chart in the 21 Jan 1992 HR stated Passenger 57 began principal photography 13 Jan 1992 in Orlando, FL. Production notes in AMPAS library files note the filmmakers planned to use Orlando International Airport for the interior airport scenes. However, Orlando’s air traffic was too busy to handle the film shoot. The production chose to film at Sanford Airport, a smaller facility approximately an hour away. The shooting schedule was planned around the regularly scheduled flights, and Sanford Airport management gave the filmmakers the use of an 8,000 foot runway “to accommodate takeoffs and landings for a huge aircraft.” The 15 Apr 1992 DV reported the completion of principal photography.
       An item in the 9 Nov 1992 LAT reported Passenger 57 was the highest grossing film in its first weekend of release, with a box-office gross of $11 million.
       The 11 May 1995 HR reported that Jonathan Sheinberg filed a $1 million breach of contract lawsuit against producer Lee Rich. Sheinberg claimed that during his 1988-1991 tenure as president of feature pictures for Lee Rich Productions, he had a deal to receive $75,000 for films he “substantially developed,” and an additional fifteen percent of Rich’s “retention on produced films.” Passenger 57, which credits Sheinberg as executive producer, is one of the films cited in his lawsuit. The outcome of the lawsuit is ... More Less

A production chart in the 21 Jan 1992 HR stated Passenger 57 began principal photography 13 Jan 1992 in Orlando, FL. Production notes in AMPAS library files note the filmmakers planned to use Orlando International Airport for the interior airport scenes. However, Orlando’s air traffic was too busy to handle the film shoot. The production chose to film at Sanford Airport, a smaller facility approximately an hour away. The shooting schedule was planned around the regularly scheduled flights, and Sanford Airport management gave the filmmakers the use of an 8,000 foot runway “to accommodate takeoffs and landings for a huge aircraft.” The 15 Apr 1992 DV reported the completion of principal photography.
       An item in the 9 Nov 1992 LAT reported Passenger 57 was the highest grossing film in its first weekend of release, with a box-office gross of $11 million.
       The 11 May 1995 HR reported that Jonathan Sheinberg filed a $1 million breach of contract lawsuit against producer Lee Rich. Sheinberg claimed that during his 1988-1991 tenure as president of feature pictures for Lee Rich Productions, he had a deal to receive $75,000 for films he “substantially developed,” and an additional fifteen percent of Rich’s “retention on produced films.” Passenger 57, which credits Sheinberg as executive producer, is one of the films cited in his lawsuit. The outcome of the lawsuit is undetermined.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Apr 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jan 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Nov 1992
p. 6, 30.
Hollywood Reporter
11 May 1995.
---
Los Angeles Times
6 Nov 1992
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
9 Nov 1992.
---
New York Times
6 Nov 1992
p. 14.
Variety
9 Nov 1992
pp. 63-64.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. Presents
A Lee Rich Production
A Kevin Hooks Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam op
Chief lighting tech
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept asst
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Assoc ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutting by
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const foreman
Standby painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus ed
Orch
Mus score mixed by
Mus score rec by
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Asst ADR ed
Foley ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Boom op
Cable
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Main and end titles des and prod by
MAKEUP
Key makeup
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Key hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting asst
Casting asst
Scr supv
Prod secy
Asst prod secy
Staff asst
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst to Mr. Hooks
Asst to Mr. Hooks
Asst to Mr. Rich
Asst to Wesley Snipes
Loc asst
Animal wrangler
Animal wrangler
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Craft service
Craft service
Caterer
Tech adv
Tech adv
Unit pub
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Too High," written by Stevie Wonder, performed by Norman Brown, courtesy of Motown Records Company, L.P., single on Mojazz.
PERFORMER
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 November 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 6 November 1992
New York opening: week of 6 November 1992
Production Date:
13 January--mid April 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers a division of Time Warner Entertainment Company, L.P.
Copyright Date:
15 January 1993
Copyright Number:
PA598002
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
84
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32033
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Charles Rane, a notorious airplane hijacker, is about to undergo plastic surgery when FBI and police surround the building. Rane kills his doctor, jumps out the window, and a chase ensues before FBI agents capture the terrorist. Later, his attorney, Phillips, reveals Rane is being extradited to Los Angeles, California, to stand trial for two airline bombings, and agrees to notify Rane’s team of the travel plans. Meanwhile, John Cutter teaches an airline security class and berates flight attendant Marti Slayton when she takes an unnecessary risk during the hostage simulation. Airline executive “Sly” Delvecchio interrupts their argument and notes that his friend was too harsh with his critique of Marti. Sly offers Cutter a position as head of the airline’s new counterterrorism unit, but Cutter declines. Cutter was a security specialist with the airline until his wife’s death during a botched store robbery. Cutter and his wife, Lisa, were shopping when the robber ran inside, and when Cutter tried to intervene, the robber shot Lisa. Sly insists Cutter should stop blaming himself for Lisa’s death, and return to work. After consideration, Cutter accepts the position and is sent to Los Angeles to be introduced as the company’s new vice president at the annual stockholders meeting. Marti Slayton turns out to be the flight attendant on Cutter’s flight, and during her head count, she is unhappy to discover he is passenger number fifty-seven. Cutter is a nervous flyer and tries to get Marti’s attention, but she ignores him. Sabrina Ritchie, a new flight attendant, notes the situation and learns from Marti that Cutter is the airline security ... +


Charles Rane, a notorious airplane hijacker, is about to undergo plastic surgery when FBI and police surround the building. Rane kills his doctor, jumps out the window, and a chase ensues before FBI agents capture the terrorist. Later, his attorney, Phillips, reveals Rane is being extradited to Los Angeles, California, to stand trial for two airline bombings, and agrees to notify Rane’s team of the travel plans. Meanwhile, John Cutter teaches an airline security class and berates flight attendant Marti Slayton when she takes an unnecessary risk during the hostage simulation. Airline executive “Sly” Delvecchio interrupts their argument and notes that his friend was too harsh with his critique of Marti. Sly offers Cutter a position as head of the airline’s new counterterrorism unit, but Cutter declines. Cutter was a security specialist with the airline until his wife’s death during a botched store robbery. Cutter and his wife, Lisa, were shopping when the robber ran inside, and when Cutter tried to intervene, the robber shot Lisa. Sly insists Cutter should stop blaming himself for Lisa’s death, and return to work. After consideration, Cutter accepts the position and is sent to Los Angeles to be introduced as the company’s new vice president at the annual stockholders meeting. Marti Slayton turns out to be the flight attendant on Cutter’s flight, and during her head count, she is unhappy to discover he is passenger number fifty-seven. Cutter is a nervous flyer and tries to get Marti’s attention, but she ignores him. Sabrina Ritchie, a new flight attendant, notes the situation and learns from Marti that Cutter is the airline security specialist. Charles Rane, escorted by two FBI agents, also boards the plane. After take-off, Cutter asks Marti for an aspirin, admits his discomfort flying, and asks for her assistance. Moments later, Marti seats a talkative elderly lady next to Cutter to keep him company. Soon, he needs a break from the woman, and excuses himself to hide in the bathroom. Flight attendant Sabrina telephones her cohort, Vincent, in the galley below, asks for “special service,” and is sent a briefcase in the elevator. Sabrina wheels the dinner cart to Rane’s aisle, pulls out a gun, and shoots the FBI agents. As Rane is freed from handcuffs, his team of terrorists take over the plane. Cutter observes the situation, and sneaks out of the bathroom to grab the mobile airline phone. Back inside the bathroom, he telephones Sly Delvecchio. Sly answers and overhears as a hijacker opens the bathroom door, discovers Cutter and they fight. When Cutter gains the upper hand, and holds him hostage in the aisle, Rane grabs Marti and puts a gun to her head. Rane notes that airline personnel assume a risk with their jobs, but passengers do not. He pushes Marti toward Sabrina and grabs a passenger named Douglas. Rane threatens to kill Douglas unless Cutter drops his weapon. Cutter does, but Rane still shoots Douglas. He aims at Cutter, who pushes a hijacker into the path of the bullet. As Cutter dives for the elevator, Marti breaks free from Sabrina and joins him. Unconcerned, Rane contacts Vincent in the galley below to alert him. However, Cutter prevails in his fight with Vincent, and knocks the terrorist unconscious. Meanwhile, Sly alerts the airline and FBI about the hijacking. In the cargo hold, Cutter tells Marti he will force the plane to land by dumping the fuel. As the plane descends, Rane orders the co-pilot to land at a small nearby airport. The airport is too small and refuses their request to land, but Rane insists, and the manager calls police. In the cargo hold, Cutter and Marti ready to jump out upon landing. However, Rane’s man, Mr. Forget, sneaks behind them, grabs Marti, and forces Cutter out of the plane as it lands. On the tarmac, two officers arrest Cutter, and refuse to believe he is a security officer. In the airport tower, Sheriff Biggs arrives and negotiates with Rane, who threatens to murder passengers until a refueling truck arrives. Rane promises to release half of the passengers when the plane is refueled, and Biggs agrees. The officers bring Cutter into the tower, and he insists that Rane has a history of creating distractions to hide his escapes and is fooling the sheriff. However, Biggs does not believe Cutter. Rane contacts the tower and claims that Cutter is a terrorist who escaped from the plane. Biggs believes Rane and orders his officers to take Cutter to jail. On the plane, Rane orders Sabrina to carry on with their plan, and she allows half the passengers to leave, while Rane and two of his accomplices sneak out through the cargo hold. As the officers lead Cutter outside, he sees the fleeing passengers and notices Rane sneaking away. Cutter breaks free from the officers, steals a motorcycle, and follows Rane and his men to a nearby fair. Sly Delvecchio and FBI agents arrive at the airport and inform Biggs that Cutter is not a terrorist. Meanwhile, Cutter chases the terrorists through the fairground, killing one on the ferris wheel. Rane stalks Cutter on the merry-go-round, but when he stops to reload his weapon, Cutter attacks him. Officers arrive to arrest Rane, and Cutter looks for his accomplice, Vincent, but cannot find him. Vincent changes into a paramedic’s uniform and escapes, as Cutter and Rane return to the airport with FBI agents. Rane insists that his team will murder the passengers unless he is returned to the plane. The FBI agrees, but has sharpshooters ready and Cutter, who knows the terrorists, will alert them to their targets. However, as two FBI agents lead Rane back to the plane, Vincent sneaks behind the sharpshooters, kills them, and shoots the two FBI agents. Vincent opens fire on officers surrounding the plane, and Rane gets back onboard and orders the pilot to take-off. Cutter shoots Vincent, and asks Biggs to drive him to the departing plane. Cutter jumps from the car onto the plane’s landing gear as it becomes airborne. He sneaks inside the cockpit and tells the pilot to return to the airport. As the plane turns around, Rane sends Sabrina to the cockpit to investigate. Cutter knocks her unconscious, arms the pilot with a weapon, and enters the main cabin to confront Rane. As the two men battle, Rane shoots out a window. Cabin pressure drops and a flight door opens. It is a brutal battle, but Cutter prevails and pushes Rane out the door. Marti and the passengers cheer as the terrorist plummets to his death. Reporters swarm as the plane lands safely, and Sly handles the press while Cutter and Marti leave together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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