Pet Sematary II (1992)

R | 102 mins | Horror | 28 August 1992

Director:

Mary Lambert

Writer:

Richard Outten

Producer:

Ralph S. Singleton

Cinematographer:

Russell Carpenter

Editor:

Tom Finan

Production Designer:

Michelle Minch

Production Company:

Columbus Circle Films
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HISTORY

The film is a sequel to 1989’s Pet Sematary (see entry), written by Stephen King, based on his novel of the same name. An item in the 28 Aug 1992 DV quoted producer Ralph S. Singleton’s assertion that Stephen King “was right to ask for his name to be omitted from this one,” and that Singleton did not have a problem with King’s request.
       A production brief in the 25 Feb 1992 HR noted principal photography began 13 Jan 1992 in Atlanta, GA, with production offices located in Senoia, GA.
       According to the 28 Aug 1992 DV item, Singleton stated that the ending of the sequel was changed because the first one was not “strong enough.” Singleton doubted there would be a third Pet Sematary film.
       End credits include the following statements: “The Producers wish to thank: The State of Georgia; The Town of Senoia, Georgia; Georgia Film Commission, Norm Bielowicz; Riverwood Studios, John Hartnett, Manager; Irell & Manella, Ed Zeldow & Kevin Kelly; Rolling Stone Magazine; Panasonic; Braun; Schoer Manufacturing Company; Lip Smackers Inc.” and “ Once Upon A Time In America, Courtesy of Embassy International Pictures ©1984. Embassy International Pictures ... More Less

The film is a sequel to 1989’s Pet Sematary (see entry), written by Stephen King, based on his novel of the same name. An item in the 28 Aug 1992 DV quoted producer Ralph S. Singleton’s assertion that Stephen King “was right to ask for his name to be omitted from this one,” and that Singleton did not have a problem with King’s request.
       A production brief in the 25 Feb 1992 HR noted principal photography began 13 Jan 1992 in Atlanta, GA, with production offices located in Senoia, GA.
       According to the 28 Aug 1992 DV item, Singleton stated that the ending of the sequel was changed because the first one was not “strong enough.” Singleton doubted there would be a third Pet Sematary film.
       End credits include the following statements: “The Producers wish to thank: The State of Georgia; The Town of Senoia, Georgia; Georgia Film Commission, Norm Bielowicz; Riverwood Studios, John Hartnett, Manager; Irell & Manella, Ed Zeldow & Kevin Kelly; Rolling Stone Magazine; Panasonic; Braun; Schoer Manufacturing Company; Lip Smackers Inc.” and “ Once Upon A Time In America, Courtesy of Embassy International Pictures ©1984. Embassy International Pictures N.V.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
28 Aug 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Feb 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
31 Aug 1992
p. 6.
New York Times
29 Aug 1992
p. 14.
Variety
7 Sep 1992
p. 49.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Mary Lambert Film
From Columbus Circle Films
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
2d asst photog
Video assist
Video playback
Steadicam op
Steadicam asst
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
1st company grip
2d company grip
Chief rigger
Set grip
Dolly grip
Dir of photog, 2d unit
1st asst photog, 2d unit
2d asst photog, 2d unit
Chief lighting tech, 2d unit
1st company grip, 2d unit
Lighting tech, 2d unit
Steadicam from
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
Graphic des
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Lead person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set des
Set des
Const coord
Const foreperson
Const foreperson
Scenic charge painter
Asst scenic charge painter
Greensperson
Greensperson
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Ward supv
Ward supv
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Ward buyer
MUSIC
Mus scoring mixer
Mus prod coord
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Dial ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
The loop group
The loop group
The loop group
The loop group
The loop group
The loop group
The loop group
The loop group
The loop group
The loop group
The loop group
The loop group
The loop group
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff mechanical
Spec eff des
Spec eff coord
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff fabrication
Spec eff fabrication
Spec eff fabrication
Spec eff fabrication
Spec eff fabrication
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Puppeteer
Main titles des and created by
Main titles des and created by
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup artist
Addl makeup artist
Makeup eff created by
Makeup eff supv
Makeup eff supv
Makeup eff prod coord
Local makeup eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Casting
Prod supv
Prod coord
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst locs
Prod accountant
Asst prod coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Casting asst, Los Angeles
Loc casting
Extras casting
Extras casting
Transportation coord
Transportation co-capt
Transportation co-capt
Scr supv, 2d unit
Prod asst, 2d unit
Prod asst, 2d unit
Animals supplied by
Addl animals supplied by
Dial coach
Unit pub
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“I’ve Got Spies,” by John Easdale, performed by Dramarama, courtesy of Elektra Entertainment/Chameleon Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Revolt,” by Inger Lorre and jet freedom, performed by The Nymphs, courtesy of DGC Records
“The Slasher,” by Robert J. Walsh, courtesy of The Hollywood Film Music Library
+
SONGS
“I’ve Got Spies,” by John Easdale, performed by Dramarama, courtesy of Elektra Entertainment/Chameleon Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Revolt,” by Inger Lorre and jet freedom, performed by The Nymphs, courtesy of DGC Records
“The Slasher,” by Robert J. Walsh, courtesy of The Hollywood Film Music Library
“Shitlist,” by Donita Sparks, performed by L7, courtesy of Slash Records
“Fading Away,” by Mark Governor, performed by Jan King
“Love Never Dies,” by Mark Governor, performed by Traci Lords, courtesy of Radioactive Records
“Reverence,” by James Reid and William Reid, performed by Jesus & Mary Chain, courtesy of DEF American/Warner Music U.K. Ltd., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Gush Forth My Tears,” by William Holborne, arranged and performed by Miranda Sex Garden, courtesy of Mute Records Limited, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Poison Heart,” by Dee Dee Ramone and Daniel Rey, performed by The Ramones, courtesy of Radioactive Records
“Ride On,” by Mary Cassidy, Steve Cozzi and Steve Ferrera, performed by Lulabox, courtesy of Radioactive Records.
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 August 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 28 August 1992
New York opening: week of 29 August 1992
Production Date:
began 13 January 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
20 October 1992
Copyright Number:
PA589528
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras & Lenses
Lenses
Lenses and Cameras from P.C. & E.
Prints
Prints by Deluxe®
Duration(in mins):
102
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31903
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Jeff Matthews visits his mother, Renee Hallow Matthews, on a horror movie set. The teenager is hopeful that his estranged parents will reconcile, but Renee is accidentally electrocuted during filming. Chase Matthews, a veterinarian and Jeff’s father, decides to return to their hometown of Ludlow, Maine. At Renee’s funeral, Sheriff Gus Gilbert keeps reporters from disturbing the grieving family. As they move into their new home, movers put Renee’s belongings in the attic. Marjorie Hargrove, their new housekeeper, arrives as a mover drops one of Renee’s boxes. Marjorie is thrilled to see a gown Renee wore to an awards ceremony and starts to pick it up, but Jeff stops her from touching his mother’s dress. Later, Chase and Jeff inspect the veterinary office Chase is taking over. The previous doctor retired several years ago and the place is rather decrepit. In the back, Jeff discovers a box of kittens and asks if he can adopt one, and his father agrees. Gus enters with his stepson, Drew, and Drew’s injured dog, "Zowie." Gus claims the dog got too close to Gus’s rabbit pens and was bitten. As Chase tends to Zowie’s wounds, Gus informs Jeff that he dated Renee during high school. On his first day of school, Jeff hides his kitten, "Tiger," in his jacket. After school, Clyde Parker grabs the kitten, and bicycles away with Drew Gilbert and other friends. Jeff chases them through town, past the deserted Creed home, to the edge of the woods. Clyde claims his kitten is dead and Jeff will find it in the “Pet Sematary.” ... +


Jeff Matthews visits his mother, Renee Hallow Matthews, on a horror movie set. The teenager is hopeful that his estranged parents will reconcile, but Renee is accidentally electrocuted during filming. Chase Matthews, a veterinarian and Jeff’s father, decides to return to their hometown of Ludlow, Maine. At Renee’s funeral, Sheriff Gus Gilbert keeps reporters from disturbing the grieving family. As they move into their new home, movers put Renee’s belongings in the attic. Marjorie Hargrove, their new housekeeper, arrives as a mover drops one of Renee’s boxes. Marjorie is thrilled to see a gown Renee wore to an awards ceremony and starts to pick it up, but Jeff stops her from touching his mother’s dress. Later, Chase and Jeff inspect the veterinary office Chase is taking over. The previous doctor retired several years ago and the place is rather decrepit. In the back, Jeff discovers a box of kittens and asks if he can adopt one, and his father agrees. Gus enters with his stepson, Drew, and Drew’s injured dog, "Zowie." Gus claims the dog got too close to Gus’s rabbit pens and was bitten. As Chase tends to Zowie’s wounds, Gus informs Jeff that he dated Renee during high school. On his first day of school, Jeff hides his kitten, "Tiger," in his jacket. After school, Clyde Parker grabs the kitten, and bicycles away with Drew Gilbert and other friends. Jeff chases them through town, past the deserted Creed home, to the edge of the woods. Clyde claims his kitten is dead and Jeff will find it in the “Pet Sematary.” He regales Jeff with the story of Louis Creed, who buried his son beyond the Pet Sematary to bring the boy back to life, and Clyde suggests Jeff should bury his mother there. Jeff punches Clyde, and the boys fight until Jeff is knocked down. Jeff trudges to the Pet Sematary and finds Tiger locked in a bird cage, still alive. As he retrieves his cat, Drew Gilbert joins him. Drew is impressed because no one ever punched Clyde before. Jeff asks about Clyde’s story of people coming back to life, but Drew insists it is merely a story. Later at Drew’s home, Gus refuses to let Zowie recuperate inside the house. When the dog barks at his rabbits again, Gus is furious and gets his rifle. Despite Drew’s pleas, Gus shoots Zowie and Drew chases the fatally wounded dog into the woods. In the morning, Drew asks Jeff to accompany him to bury Zowie. However, Drew passes the Pet Sematary, and wants to bury Zowie in the Indian burial grounds. Jeff is reluctant but Drew thinks there might be a chance the animal could come back to life. Jeff offers to help, but Drew insists the legend dictates you must bury your own. When Zowie returns during the night, Gus is furious that Drew “lied” about his dog’s death, and grounds his stepson. Zowie’s eyes glow red as he growls at them, and he still has a bullet wound. Drew’s mother, Amanda, calls Chase and they take the dog to the clinic. Days later, Chase is surprised that Zowie’s wound is not healing, and he cannot hear a heartbeat. He takes a blood sample to send for analysis, then Jeff and Drew lock Zowie in a cage near the kittens. On Halloween night, Gus works late, so Amanda allows Drew to go to the Pet Sematary with his friends. As Jeff and Drew arrive at the seemingly deserted Pet Sematary, a ghostly mannequin, dressed to look like Jeff’s mother, flies toward them and Jeff screams as Clyde leads the other teenagers out of hiding. Meanwhile, Gus stops at home and becomes furious when he learns that Drew went out. When Gus arrives at the Pet Sematary, the teens scatter. Clyde knocks Drew down, and Jeff stays behind with his friend. Gus hits Drew, then picks up the cross from a grave to strike his stepson, but Zowie attacks Gus, ripping out part of his throat. Jeff suggests burying Gus in the Indian burial ground might bring him back. The next morning, Drew awakens to find Gus has returned, alive but strange. Gus bandages his neck wound, then gets into bed with his wife, who notices he is icy cold and smells bad, and is surprised when he violently forces himself on her. Chase receives a telephone call that the blood he sent for analysis was from a dead animal. Chase insists Zowie is alive and the technician says the last person who sent him blood from a dead animal was Chase’s predecessor, Quentin Yolander. As Chase hangs up the phone, he discovers Zowie has escaped from his cage and killed the kittens. Chase visits Quentin Yolander, who reveals he had a similar situation with the Creed family cat, "Church." Yolander claims Church came back from the dead, as did Creed’s wife and son. He warns Chase to leave Ludlow, but Chase is inclined to believe that Yolander is crazy. Later, Jeff and Drew watch Gus kill and skin his rabbits, and eat them for dinner. That night, Chase dreams of making love to Renee and her head transforms into Zowie. Chase wakes up as Zowie jumps on his bed and bites him. Chase shoots at the dog as it jumps out the window. The next day, as Jeff and Drew ride their bicycles, they wonder if everyone who comes back would be strange like Gus, and decide it depends on what a person was like before death. Drew heads home, but turns around when he sees Clyde speed past him on a motorbike toward Jeff. Clyde forces Jeff’s bike off the road and Jeff tumbles down a steep incline. Clyde rides down the slope and threatens Jeff, but Gus arrives and orders Jeff to leave. Gus murders Clyde, then looks up at the road and realizes that Drew witnessed the killing. Drew heads home, with Gus in pursuit. He gets a rifle, but it has no bullets. Gus attacks with a hammer, and Drew runs upstairs. His mother drives up as Drew climbs out the window to escape. They speed away, but Gus pursues them. He forces their car into the path of an oncoming truck, killing Drew and his mother. Gus leaves the scene of the accident, retrieves Clyde’s body and buries it in the Indian burial ground. After Drew’s funeral, Chase finds Jeff in their attic, unpacking Renee’s clothes. Jeff insists he can bring Renee back, like he and Drew brought Zowie and Gus back to life. Chase does not believe him, but is interrupted by a call from the cemetery caretaker. He leaves Marjorie to watch over Jeff, and rushes to his wife’s gravesite, where he learns that Gus took Renee’s body. Meanwhile, Jeff sneaks past the sleeping housekeeper and goes to the Indian burial ground. Gus hands Jeff a shovel, tells him he must bury his own, and gives him Renee’s body. Smiling, Jeff starts digging her new grave. When Marjorie Hargrove awakens and looks for Jeff in the attic, she finds Renee’s gown and tries it on. Armed with a gun, Chase goes to Gus’s house. Zowie attacks him, but Chase shoots the dog, and it dies. He finds Gus in the kitchen and the two men fight. It is a brutal battle until Chase shoots Gus in the head, killing him. As Marjorie admires herself in Renee’s gown, Renee returns and kills her. Jeff joins his mother in the attic and Chase returns home to find Renee hugging Jeff. She promises to make their marriage work, but Chase insists she is not really Renee, who is dead. Renee tells Jeff that she loves him and asks him to go downstairs while she talks with Chase. However, when Jeff opens the door, Clyde stands there with an axe. Renee laughs as Clyde knocks out Chase and attacks Jeff. While the boys battle, she locks the door and sets the attic on fire. Clyde slices the line to the power box and raises the axe to kill Jeff, who grabs the surging power line and sticks it in Clyde’s mouth, electrocuting him. As Jeff rushes to help his father, Renee laughs that she is melting and asks Jeff to stay with her, insisting dead is better. Jeff grabs the axe, breaks open the door and drags his father to safety. Chase, Jeff and his cat, Tiger, leave Ludlow. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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