Stephen King's Sleepwalkers (1992)

R | 91 mins | Horror | 10 April 1992

Director:

Mick Garris

Writer:

Stephen King

Cinematographer:

Rodney Charters

Production Designer:

John DeCuir, Jr.

Production Companies:

Columbia Pictures, Ion Pictures
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HISTORY

The 13 Apr 1992 HR review stated that the film was novelist Stephen King’s first piece written directly for the screen. The 13 Apr 1992 DV review noted that King appeared in a cameo role, as did horror genre directors Joe Dante, Tobe Hooper, Clive Barker and John Landis. Actor Mark Hamill was also featured in an uncredited cameo as a Bodega Bay, CA, sheriff.
       According to an article in the 3 Apr 1992 HR, producers Michael Grais, Mark Victor, and ION Pictures outbid two studios to obtain rights to King’s screenplay. Grais stated that there was a subsequent “bidding situation” between two studios to make the film, and the producers chose Sony/Columbia, because they “wanted to make it more than the others.” The production’s budget was under $15 million.
       A production chart in the 25 Jun 1991 HR announced that principal photography began 24 Jun 1991 in Los Angeles, CA. Production notes in AMPAS library files report that locations included two soundstages on the Sony Pictures Studio lot in Culver City, CA, and a Midwestern-looking street on the Warner Bros. back lot in Burbank, CA. The family home from the CBS television series The Waltons (1972-1981) was chosen as the residence of the film’s villainous “Sleepwalkers,” and the coast of Malibu, CA, represented Bodega Bay.
       A special “cat unit” was created to film several scenes, including one involving more than one hundred cats. The role of “Clovis” is credited to “Sparks.” However, production notes reveal that eight cats portrayed the heroic feline, each with its own special talent. Principal ... More Less

The 13 Apr 1992 HR review stated that the film was novelist Stephen King’s first piece written directly for the screen. The 13 Apr 1992 DV review noted that King appeared in a cameo role, as did horror genre directors Joe Dante, Tobe Hooper, Clive Barker and John Landis. Actor Mark Hamill was also featured in an uncredited cameo as a Bodega Bay, CA, sheriff.
       According to an article in the 3 Apr 1992 HR, producers Michael Grais, Mark Victor, and ION Pictures outbid two studios to obtain rights to King’s screenplay. Grais stated that there was a subsequent “bidding situation” between two studios to make the film, and the producers chose Sony/Columbia, because they “wanted to make it more than the others.” The production’s budget was under $15 million.
       A production chart in the 25 Jun 1991 HR announced that principal photography began 24 Jun 1991 in Los Angeles, CA. Production notes in AMPAS library files report that locations included two soundstages on the Sony Pictures Studio lot in Culver City, CA, and a Midwestern-looking street on the Warner Bros. back lot in Burbank, CA. The family home from the CBS television series The Waltons (1972-1981) was chosen as the residence of the film’s villainous “Sleepwalkers,” and the coast of Malibu, CA, represented Bodega Bay.
       A special “cat unit” was created to film several scenes, including one involving more than one hundred cats. The role of “Clovis” is credited to “Sparks.” However, production notes reveal that eight cats portrayed the heroic feline, each with its own special talent. Principal photography was completed 4 Sep 1991.
       The 31 Mar 1992 DV announced the film’s release date as 10 Apr 1992. The producers took advantage of April Fool’s day by releasing a television advertisement, for broadcast on 1 Apr 1992. The thirty-second commercial proclaimed the film as “the first Stephen King movie full of nice kids, cute pets and no nastiness whatsoever… April Fool’s.” What followed was a montage of “biting, slashing and blood” before concluding with, “The terror begins April 10, and that’s no joke.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
31 Mar 1992.
---
Daily Variety
13 Apr 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Apr 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 1992
p. 9, 12.
Los Angeles Times
13 Apr 1992
p. 9.
New York Times
11 Apr 1992
p. 18.
Variety
20 Apr 1992
p. 48.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures Presents
An ION Pictures
Victor & Grais Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d unit dir
2d unit 1st asst dir
2d unit 1st asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Best boy elec
Key grip
2d grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Addl photog, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
Chief lighting tech, 2d unit
Chief lighting tech, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const supv
Const supv
Set des
Prop master, 2d unit
Prop master, 2d unit
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Key costumer
Key costumer
MUSIC
Supv mus ed
Mus ed
Scoring mixer
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Asst sd ed
Prod sd mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
ADR ed
Foley by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff asst
Spec visual eff by
Visual eff supv, Apogee Productions, Inc.
Exec prod, Apogee Productions, Inc.
Viusal eff prod, Apogee Productions, Inc.
Cam op, Apogee Productions, Inc.
Cam op, Apogee Productions, Inc.
Lead anim, Apogee Productions, Inc.
PDI art dir, Apogee Productions, Inc.
PDI anim, Apogee Productions, Inc.
Titles & opticals by
MAKEUP
Key makeup
Key makeup
Key hairstylist
Transportation co-capt
Spec makeup eff by
Project supv, Alterian Studios, Inc.
Mechanical des/Projet foreman, Alterian Studios, I
Prosthetic des and sculpture, Alterian Studios, In
Prosthetic des and sculpture, Alterian Studios, In
Creature suit des and sculpture, Alterian Studios,
Paint des/Sculpting, Alterian Studios, Inc.
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod supv
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod accountant
Loc mgr
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Animals supplied by
Head animal trainer
Head animal trainer
Addl animal trainer
Craft service
Unit pub
Asst to Mr. Garris
Asst to prods
Asst to prods
Asst to prods
Asst to prods
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
2d unit scr supv
2d unit scr supv
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Sleepwalk,” written by Johnny Farina, Santo Farina & Ann Farina, performed by Santo & Johnny, courtesy of Dischi Ricordi SPA, by arrangement with Celebrity Licensing Inc.
“Boadicea,” written by Enya & Nicky Ryan, performed by Enya, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp. and BBC Enterprises Limited, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Do You Love Me,” written by Berry Gordy, performed by The Contours, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P.
+
SONGS
“Sleepwalk,” written by Johnny Farina, Santo Farina & Ann Farina, performed by Santo & Johnny, courtesy of Dischi Ricordi SPA, by arrangement with Celebrity Licensing Inc.
“Boadicea,” written by Enya & Nicky Ryan, performed by Enya, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp. and BBC Enterprises Limited, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Do You Love Me,” written by Berry Gordy, performed by The Contours, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P.
“It (‘S A Monster),” written by Nuno Bettencourt & Gary Cherone, performed by Extreme, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
“The Rodeo Song,” written by Gaye Delorme.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Sleepwalkers
Release Date:
10 April 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 10 April 1992
New York opening: 11 April 1992
Production Date:
24 June--4 September 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
24 April 1992
Copyright Number:
PA565588
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
91
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31420
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Bodega Bay, California, neighbors contact police following the disappearance of a mother and her teen-aged son, who left behind a yard full of dead cats strung from trees. Sheriff Jenkins investigates, and discovers the desiccated corpse of a young girl. “Sleepwalkers” Mary Brady and her son, Charles, move to Travis, Indiana. Certain that his fellow high school student, Tanya Robertson, is a virgin, Charles tells Mary about his plan to approach Tanya at the movie theater where she works. Mary notices a cat outside their home and is angry that it avoids their animal traps. Charles promises the traps will work, and asks his mother to dance. Realizing she is jealous of Tanya, Charles kisses his mother and carries her upstairs to make love. At the theater, Tanya is excited by Charles’s attention. During English class the next day, Tanya is impressed when Charles reads his “fictional” story of mother and son sleepwalkers, who are driven from towns because they are outsiders. However, their teacher, Mr. Fallows, is not as receptive and becomes suspicious when Charles claims he is from Paradise Falls, Ohio. After school, Charles gives Tanya a ride home and she shows him photographs she has taken. Tanya plans to take pictures at Homeland Cemetery the following day, and invites Charles to join her for a picnic date. As Charles drives home in his blue Trans Am, Mr. Fallows speeds behind him and signals for the teenager to pull over. Mr. Fallows states there is no Paradise Falls, Ohio, and Charles’s transcripts are fake. When Charles insists that he has no money ... +


In Bodega Bay, California, neighbors contact police following the disappearance of a mother and her teen-aged son, who left behind a yard full of dead cats strung from trees. Sheriff Jenkins investigates, and discovers the desiccated corpse of a young girl. “Sleepwalkers” Mary Brady and her son, Charles, move to Travis, Indiana. Certain that his fellow high school student, Tanya Robertson, is a virgin, Charles tells Mary about his plan to approach Tanya at the movie theater where she works. Mary notices a cat outside their home and is angry that it avoids their animal traps. Charles promises the traps will work, and asks his mother to dance. Realizing she is jealous of Tanya, Charles kisses his mother and carries her upstairs to make love. At the theater, Tanya is excited by Charles’s attention. During English class the next day, Tanya is impressed when Charles reads his “fictional” story of mother and son sleepwalkers, who are driven from towns because they are outsiders. However, their teacher, Mr. Fallows, is not as receptive and becomes suspicious when Charles claims he is from Paradise Falls, Ohio. After school, Charles gives Tanya a ride home and she shows him photographs she has taken. Tanya plans to take pictures at Homeland Cemetery the following day, and invites Charles to join her for a picnic date. As Charles drives home in his blue Trans Am, Mr. Fallows speeds behind him and signals for the teenager to pull over. Mr. Fallows states there is no Paradise Falls, Ohio, and Charles’s transcripts are fake. When Charles insists that he has no money to pay blackmail, the teacher attempts to fondle him. Charles tears off the teacher’s hand, and as Mr. Fallows runs away, the boy transforms into a feline-like creature. He chases Mr. Fallows into the woods and kills him. Police officer Andy Simpson is parked at the roadside talking to his cat, Clovis, when Charles speeds past in his car. Andy follows and a chase ensues. The two cars approach a school bus, and Charles accelerates toward the children as they disembark. The driver pulls a little girl from the car’s path as Charles races past. When Andy catches up to Charles, the boy taunts him until Clovis looks out the window. Frightened by the cat, Charles’s face assumes monstrous shapes. Andy is stunned, but continues the pursuit. Charles outruns him, pulls to the side of the road, and uses his powers to make himself and the car disappear. Andy stops next to him, but is unable see the car or Charles. Clovis, however, is not deceived by the invisibility spell and stares at the boy. After Andy drives away, Charles reappears and uses his powers to transform the car into a red convertible. At the police station, Andy attempts to explain the strange situation, but no one believes him. When Charles returns home, his starving mother kisses him, but is infuriated upon realizing that he failed to suck the life force from Tanya. She slaps him repeatedly until she notices a deep cut on his hand, and he explains that the officer had a cat. Charles worries that something will happen to him before he can feed Mary, but she consoles her son, saying they can leave town after they feed on Tanya. As mother and son make love, their reflections in the mirror reveal their true sleepwalker forms. The next day, as Tanya and Charles drive to Homeland Cemetery in his red convertible, she asks about his blue Trans Am and he claims it is in the mechanic’s shop. Charles parks on the roadside, and when they stroll into the remote wooded graveyard, the red convertible transforms back into the blue car. After Tanya takes several pictures of Charles, she trips and drops the camera as they tumble to the ground. She kisses Charles and he starts to suck energy from her. Unable to breathe, Tanya breaks away, but Charles maintains his grip while his face assumes its true form. As he sucks more energy from Tanya, she reaches for the camera and smashes it into his head. She scrambles away, but stops when his face returns to normal, with a bloody gash on his forehead. Worried, Tanya offers to help, and Charles attacks again. Tanya grabs a corkscrew from the picnic basket and stabs his eye, but he is unfazed by the bloody wound. She slashes him with the corkscrew and runs toward the road. Andy and Clovis stop outside the cemetery when the officer recognizes Charles’s blue car. Tanya runs through the gates and the hysterical teen takes refuge in the police vehicle. Charles sneaks behind Andy, jabs a pencil into his head and Andy shoots him. However, the bullet has no effect and Charles kills Andy. As Charles turns his attention to Tanya, Clovis attacks, leaving Charles with burns where he was scratched. He throws Clovis aside and speeds home, where Mary is shocked to see her wounded son. Realizing police will soon arrive, she suggests Charles make himself invisible, but he does not have the strength. At the cemetery, Andy’s body is taken away as Tanya explains to Sheriff Ira that Charles is not human. If they develop the film from her camera, they will see he is a monster. Ira sends her home with an officer named Horace, while he joins state police captain Soames and his men at the Brady home. Hearing police sirens approach, Mary concentrates her energy and causes the blue car to vanish outside as she makes herself and Charles invisible in the living room. The officers find the yard is full of cats and animal traps, but do not find anyone home. At the Robertson house, Tanya rests upstairs while Horace has dinner with her parents. Still invisible, Mary sneaks behind the officers outside and kills them. She knocks Mr. Robertson unconscious, pushes Horace aside, and throws Mrs. Robertson through a window. Tanya rushes downstairs to help her parents, but Mary grabs her. Horace runs to the kitchen and telephones the police station, where officers are studying Tanya’s strange photos of Charles. As Horace tells them of Mary’s attack, she stabs him to death with a corncob. Captain Soames and his men arrive as Mary drags Tanya across the yard. When Soames attempts to stop her, Mary bites off several of his fingers and breaks his arm. She shoots at two police vehicles, blowing them up and killing the officers inside. Mary leaves in another police car with Tanya. Meanwhile, Clovis leads the town’s cats to the Brady’s home. Mary discovers the cats on her lawn and drives through the front of the house. As Ira arrives, Clovis climbs a tree and enters through a second-story window. Inside, Charles is near death, but Mary uses her energy to help him dance with Tanya. Charles transforms into a sleepwalker and sucks energy from Tanya until she digs her fingers into his eye. Mary attempts to intervene, but Clovis jumps on her and she starts to burn. Ira runs inside as Mary pulls Clovis from her back. The policeman fires his gun, but she is unaffected by the bullets and reverts to her sleepwalker form. Tanya and Ira run to his car, but an invisible Mary sneaks behind them and throws Ira into the yard, where his hand is caught in an animal trap. As Mary breaks the car window to reach Tanya, Ira throws an animal trap onto her head. Mary pulls it off and impales Ira on the fence. The cats attack Mary, who ignites into flames and burns to death, screaming that Tanya killed her son. Clovis joins Tanya in the car and she hugs the cat. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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